Bowdoin College Catalogue and Academic Handbook

Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 1016  (b, FYS)   Imagining Futures  

Willi Lempert.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

How, why, and for whom do we imagine the future? Focuses on the future through the lens of indigenous science fiction and off-Earth exploration and settlement. Students engage with indigenous films and science fiction, popular and scholarly literature about space exploration, and the writing of cultural anthropologists to develop skills in analyzing visual and written texts and to reflect on “the future” as created by our individual and collective hopes, fears, and expectations.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

ANTH 1029  (b, FYS)   People Like Us: Class, Identity, and Inequality  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Our socioeconomic class shapes who we are. At the same time, class is a powerful form of inequality. We use three ethnographic case studies of class (in China, India, and in the U.S.), along with fiction, poetry, and film, to explore the following questions: How is class "performed" and interpreted in different cultures? How do class identities feed back into systems of inequality? How does class intersect with other forms of identity and inequality, such as gender, race, and caste? Key theorists are also brought into play.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

ANTH 1030  (b, FYS)   Anthropology of Art  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Considers art from a comparative, cross-cultural perspective and examines the relationship between Western aesthetics and art produced in non-Western cultures (e.g., Native Americans, Pacific Islanders, and others). Through assigned readings and class discussion, explores topics such as the role of aesthetics in production of art, the significance of how these works are produced and circulated, and the ways art objects acquire meaning.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

ANTH 1101  (b)   Introduction to Cultural Anthropology  

Willi Lempert.
Every Semester. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 50.
  

Cultural anthropology explores the diversities and commonalities of cultures and societies in an increasingly interconnected world. Introduces students to the significant issues, concepts, theories, and methods in cultural anthropology. Topics may include cultural relativism and ethnocentrism, fieldwork and ethics, symbolism, language, religion and ritual, political and economic systems, family and kinship, gender, class, ethnicity and race, nationalism and transnationalism, and ethnographic representation and validity.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015.

ANTH 1103  (b)   Introduction to World Prehistory  

Lauren Kohut.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 50.
  

An introduction to the discipline of archaeology and the studies of human biological and cultural evolution. Among the subjects covered are conflicting theories of human biological evolution, debates over the genetic and cultural bases of human behavior, the expansion of human populations into various ecosystems throughout the world, the domestication of plants and animals, the shift from nomadic to settled village life, and the rise of complex societies and the state.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2018.

ANTH 1125  (b, IP)   Audiovisual Cultures: The Anthropology of Sight and Sound  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Explores sight and sound as reflections of historical, cultural, political, and social forces, challenging the assumption that seeing and hearing are solely biological processes. Draws on case studies from diverse cultures, places, and historical moments to ask how people see and hear differently and how they interpret the relationship between what their eyes and ears tell them. Introduces students to the interdisciplinary fields of visual studies and sound studies in order to reflect on a wide array of topics which may include aesthetics, the body, performance, power, technology, and media, among others. Asks in particular how anthropologists’ attention to the audiovisual might enrich our understanding of the diverse ways that human beings live in and understand the world and how everyday processes, including our own experiences of seeing and hearing, produce culture. Attends to power hierarchies and social inequalities in diverse cultural contexts. Students engage in hands-on activities to produce audiovisual material as well as developing the skills to collect and analyze various types of audio and visual data.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

ANTH 1138  (b, ESD, IP)   Everyday Life in India and Pakistan  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 50.  

Focuses on contemporary life in India and Pakistan by looking at everyday experiences and objects. Explores topics such as teen cyberculture, painted truck designs, romance fiction, AIDS activism, and memories of violence. These seemingly mundane topics offer a window onto larger cultural processes and enable us to examine identities and inequalities of gender, religion, caste, class, ethnicity, and nationality. Sources include ethnographic texts, essays, fiction, government documents, newspapers, popular and documentary films, and YouTube videos

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

ANTH 2010  (b)   Ethnographic Research  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Anthropological research methods and perspectives are examined through classic and recent ethnography, statistics and computer literacy, and the student’s own fieldwork experience. Topics include ethics, analytical and methodological techniques, the interpretation of data, and the use and misuse of anthropology.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

ANTH 2020  (b)   Archaeological Research  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Introduces students to the methods and concepts that archaeologists use to explore the human past. Shows how concepts from natural science, history, and anthropology help archaeologists investigate past societies, reveal the form and function of ancient cultural remains, and draw inferences about the nature and causes of change in human societies over time. Includes a significant fieldwork component, including excavations on campus.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1102 or ANTH 1150 or ARCH 1101 (same as ARTH 2090) or ARCH 1102 (same as ARTH 2100) or ARTH 2100.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

ANTH 2030  (b)   History of Anthropological Theory  

Krista Van Vleet.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

An examination of the development of various theoretical approaches to the study of culture and society. Anthropology in the United States, Britain, and France is covered from the nineteenth century to the present. Among those considered are Morgan, Tylor, Durkheim, Boas, Malinowski, Mead, Geertz, and Lévi-Strauss.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

ANTH 2105  (c, IP)   Who Owns the Past? The Roles of Museums in Preserving and Presenting Culture  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the storied place of museums in the acquisition, preservation, and display of cultural heritage. The past practices of museums are studied with an eye to how they inform present policies. Aims to examine museums’ responses when confronting national and ethnic claims to items in museums’ permanent collections; the ethical choices involved in deciding what should be exhibited; the impact of politics, conflicts, and war on museum practices; and the alliances between museums, archaeologists, art historians, and anthropologists. Students benefit from conversations with a number of Bowdoin faculty and staff, as well as a series of guest speakers from other organizations. Selected readings and class discussion are augmented by visits to the College’s two museums and other local museums.

Prerequisites: ANTH 2000 - 2969 or ARCH 2000 - 2969 or ARTH 2000 - 2969 or SOC 2000 - 2969.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

ANTH 2215  (b, MCSR)   Mapping the Social World: Geographic Information Systems in Social Science Research  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 20.  

Examines the use of geographical information systems (GIS) to organize, analyze, and visualize spatial data within social science and humanities research. Introduces foundational concepts of cartography, database design, spatial data representation, and data visualization. Provides hands-on experience in spatial data collection, three-dimensional modeling, spatial analysis, spatial network analysis, and spatial statistics. The application of GIS to areas of social scientific and humanistic inquiry are explored through examination of case studies, weekly laboratory exercises, and an individual semester project that culminates in a conference-style research poster. Case studies and data sets are drawn from anthropology, archaeology, and related fields, such as sociology, history, and cultural geography.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101 - 1103 or SOC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

ANTH 2220  (b, ESD, IP)   Medical Anthropology  

Damien Droney.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Medical anthropology explores health, medicine, and the body as embedded in cultural contexts and shaped by social inequalities. Introduces foundational concepts and approaches that emphasize the meanings and experiences of health and illness. Develops tools for understanding health, illness, and well-being within broader systems of power, including inequalities of gender, ethnicity, race, class, and sexuality. Examines case studies in a variety of contexts to trace the implications of these approaches. Topics may include the production of authoritative knowledge, symbolic and ritual healing, mental illness, pharmaceuticals, organ donation and the commodification of body parts, disability, and/or well-being. Reflects on the unique methods and perspectives that anthropologists bring to the field of medicine, along with the role of anthropologists in public debates about health.

ANTH 2227  (c, ESD, VPA)   Protest Music  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Focuses on the ways black people have experienced twentieth-century events. Examines social, economic, and political catalysts for processes of protest music production across genres including gospel, blues, folk, soul, funk, rock, reggae, and rap. Analysis of musical and extra- musical elements includes style, form, production, lyrics, intent, reception, commodification, mass-media, and the Internet. Explores ways in which people experience, identify, and propose solutions to poverty, segregation, oppressive working conditions, incarceration, sexual exploitation, violence, and war. (Same as: AFRS 2228, MUS 2292)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2016.

ANTH 2230  (b, ESD)   Language, Identity, and Power  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

What place does language have in everyday life? How are identities produced and perceived in personal and social interactions? How is language used to reinforce, challenge, or reconfigure relationships of power? Approaches the study of language as a social and historical reality that emerges in the interactions of individuals. Using examples from a variety of social and cultural contexts, discusses the relationship between language, culture, and thought; structure and agency; language and social inequality; language acquisition and socialization; multilingualism and multiculturalism; verbal art and performance. Considers how aspects of an individual’s identity, such as gender, race, ethnicity, class, age, and sexual orientation, articulate in social and linguistic interactions.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101 or SOC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

ANTH 2246  (b, IP)   Hierarchies of Care: From Kinship to Global Citizenship  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Care shapes the relationships of children, adults, and elders within families, but care also extends far beyond the boundaries of households, incorporating domestic workers, volunteers, medical professionals, missionaries, humanitarian organizations, and governments. This course explores recent scholarship on care as a form of intimate labor and an array of social practices that are embedded in local cultural contexts and shaped by global political economic relationships. Gender, race and ethnicity, class, nationality, and age shape the configurations of caring by and caring for others. Incorporates attention to feminist, decolonial, and poststructuralist theories of power as operating on bodies and intimate relationships. Course texts include ethnographies, scholarly articles, and other materials. Draws on a wide array of contemporary contexts around the world for ethnographic case studies.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1000 - 2969 or ANTH 3000 or higher or SOC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

ANTH 2250  (b, ESD)   The Anthropology of Media  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the social and political life of media and how it makes a difference in the daily lives of people as a practice--in production, reception, and/or circulation. Introduces some key concepts in social theory which have been critical to the study of the media across disciplines, ranging historically, geographically, and methodologically; investigates the role of media in constituting and contesting national identities, forging alternative political visions, transforming religious practice, and in creating subcultures; examines diverse source materials such as early experiments in documentary film to the Internet, from news reporting to advertising.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101 or SOC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2016.

ANTH 2340  (b, IP)   Ethnographic Film  

April Strickland.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Considers the development of ethnographic film from an anthropological lens and international perspectives. Starting with the advent of the documentary and concluding with ethnographic new media, investigates how, why, and to what end film has been used as a tool by anthropologists and the communities that they work with to expand discussions about the modern world. Topics include filmmaking as a methodology for social scientists, the connections between ethnographic film and self-determination efforts in minority communities, critical examinations of media-making practices--onscreen and off--and the global impact these factors have had. (Same as: CINE 2831)

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101 or SOC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

ANTH 2345  (b, IP)   Carnival and Control: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Brazil  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Every year, Brazilians pour onto the street to celebrate carnival, with its festive traditions of gender ambiguity, sexual libertinism, and inversion of social hierarchies. Questions how this image of diversity and freedom is squared with Brazil's practices of social control: high rates of economic inequality and police violence, as well as limited reproductive rights. Using carnival and control as frameworks, examines how contemporary Brazilian society articulates gender roles and sexual identities, as well as racial and class hierarchies. While course content focuses on Brazil, topics addressed are relevant to students seeking to understand how institutions of intimacy, propriety, and power are worked out through interpersonal relations. (Same as: GSWS 2345, LAS 2345)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

ANTH 2350  (b, IP)   Global Indigenous Cinema  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Surveys indigenous-produced film from around the globe, with an emphasis on contemporary Native North American and Aboriginal Australia cinema. Engages recent technological innovations in filmmaking. Analyzes film through discussion and writing, pairing screenings with readings of anthropological and Indigenous scholarship. Considers film in relation to the social, historical, and cultural contexts and broader global processes of indigenous media production and circulation.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1000 - 2969 or ANTH 3000 or higher or CINE 1000 - 2969 or CINE 3000 or higher or SOC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

ANTH 2390  (b)   Science, Technology, and Culture  

Damien Droney.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Explores science and technology as institutions and cultural forces that are culturally and historically situated. Introduces key theoretical approaches and concepts, focusing on anthropological research. Considers how scientific knowledge is produced in places such as laboratories, hospitals, clinical research sites, conservation areas, the military, and/or computing projects in diverse societies. Asks how power is ascribed to this way of knowing in everyday life. Compares western science with indigenous and traditional knowledge systems. Examines the role of science and technology in the social construction of race in colonial and postcolonial political projects. Takes a global perspective, juxtaposing cases from Asia, Latin America, Africa, and/or Oceania. Addresses differing definitions of science and technology, standards of objectivity, and the politics of technoscience.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101 or SOC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

ANTH 2420  (b, ESD)   The Anthropology of Sport  

April Strickland.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Examines, from an anthropological perspective, the practice and conceptualization of sport. Using a variety of methodologies, investigates the meaning invested in various sporting endeavors, as well as how these vary across time and cultural context. Topics include soccer fandom in the UK, Title IX legislation in the US, Maori masculinity and rugby in New Zealand, the impact of instant replay, and the challenges of performance-enhancing drugs. Also considers the relationship between sports and nationalism, sports and gender, and the global political economy of multibillion-dollar athletic industries.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101 or SOC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2016.

ANTH 2440  (b, IP)   Health and Healing in South Asia  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Explores the universe of sickness and healing from the perspectives of people living in South Asia—India and surrounding countries—and addresses several related topics: how people in South Asia have conceived of the body, health, and illness; how local and global cultural, political, and economic factors influence health, illness, and healing; and how people in South Asia understand and experience illness and seek healing through biomedicine, indigenous medical systems, ritual, and religious healing. Readings include ethnographic, historical, and theoretical texts from cultural and medical anthropology.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101 or SOC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

ANTH 2450  (b)   Evolution as Science and Story: Monkey Trials, Selfish Genes, and Why Origins Matter  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Darwin was not the first to propose that humans originated through a process of evolution, but his book On the Origin of Species sparked a conflict that continues today. Surveys suggest that the American public is roughly split on the question of whether humans evolved or were created. This course draws on anthropological studies of science and of religion to situate the “culture wars” over evolution and creation in cultural and historical perspective. Introduces the science of evolution and multiple views on human origins from the nineteenth to twenty-first centuries. Considers origin stories from around the world to develop a framework for understanding how such stories provide powerful explanations of “where we come from” and “who we are.” Considers contentious debates over teaching evolution, and why it matters. Incorporates primary texts from a variety of perspectives with scholarship in anthropology.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1000 - 2969 or ANTH 3000 or higher or SOC 1000 - 2969 or SOC 3000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

ANTH 2470  (b, IP)   Religions of the African Atlantic  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Introduces the religious beliefs and practices of African peoples and their descendants in the Americas. Topics will include historical spiritual links between Africa and the African diaspora, spirits and divinities from an Afro-Atlantic perspective, and religious contact and mixture in Africa and the Americas. The contributions of Afro-Atlantic peoples to global Christianity, Islam, and other world religions will be explored. After a brief historical and cultural grounding, the course pursues these issues thematically, considering various Afro-Atlantic religious technologies in turn, from divination and spirit possession to computers and mass media.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101 or SOC 1101 or AFRS 1101 or REL 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

ANTH 2480  (b, IP)   War and Peace: Perspectives on Conflict in Humanity's Past and Present  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Explores perspectives on the origins and causes of war, the consequences of war on human society, the role of conflict in state formation and imperial expansion, and the relationship between war and the potential for peace. Mobilizes theories and analytical perspectives employed in archaeology and cultural anthropology to examine the material evidence for conflict, including traumatic injuries on human remains, fortifications, settlement patterns, weapons, and iconography. Investigates a range of case studies about prehistoric cultures in the New World (North and South America) as well as Africa, Asia, and the Pacific and considers implications for the contemporary world.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101 or ANTH 1103.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

ANTH 2533  (b, ESD, IP)   Peoples and Cultures of Africa  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Introduction to the traditional patterns of livelihood and social institutions of African peoples. Following a brief overview of African geography, habitat, and cultural history, lectures and readings cover a representative range of types of economy, polity, and social organization, from the smallest hunting and gathering societies to the most complex states and empires. Emphasis upon understanding the nature of traditional social forms. Changes in African societies in the colonial and post-colonial periods examined, but are not the principal focus.

Prerequisites: AFRS 1101 or ANTH 1000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2017.

ANTH 2552  (b)   Find a Way or Make One: Arctic Exploration in Cultural, Historical, and Environmental Context  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Bowdoin faculty and students have been traveling to the Arctic since 1860 studying northern environments and cultures and exploring unmapped regions. Their work is part of a longer history involving Westerners who have been exploring the Arctic for centuries, drawn by a desire to map the geography of the earth, claim lands and their resources, find new shipping routes, understand Arctic environments, and develop insights into the lifeways of northern indigenous peoples. Examines some of the social, economic, political, and scientific factors shaping Arctic exploration. The ways in which expeditions and specific explorers affected and continue to affect northern peoples, the general public, and the contemporary geopolitical landscape are examined. Students read published accounts and unpublished journals and papers, and study archival photographs and motion picture films.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101 or ANTH 1150.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

ANTH 2572  (b, ESD, IP)   Contemporary Arctic Environmental and Cultural Issues  

Susan Kaplan.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Throughout the Arctic, northern peoples face major environmental changes and cultural and economic challenges. Landscapes, icescapes, and seascapes on which communities rely are being transformed, and arctic plants and animals are being affected. Many indigenous groups see these dramatic changes as endangering their health and cultural way of life. Others see a warming Arctic as an opportunity for industrial development. Addressing contemporary issues that concern northern peoples in general and Inuit in particular involves understanding connections between leadership, global environmental change, human rights, indigenous cultures, and foreign policies, and being able to work on both a global and local level. (Same as: ENVS 2312)

Prerequisites: Two of: either ANTH 1150 or ANTH 1101 or ANTH 1102 and ENVS 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

ANTH 2610  (b)   Sex and State Power  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Examines sexual politics of the law, policing, public health, and state surveillance and explores feminist and queer responses to the relationship between sex and power from a variety of disciplines and traditions. Focuses on two major trends in the regulation of sex in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries: (1) how policy making has shifted from defining sexual morality to managing populations, and (2) the reinvigorated politics of the family as governments scale back their social welfare programs. Additional topics may include reproductive rights, sex work, marriage, hate crimes, surveillance, militarism, and prisons. Students learn main trends in the politics of sexuality and conduct a research project on the topic of their choice. (Same as: GSWS 2610)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2016.

ANTH 2737  (b, ESD, IP)   Family, Gender,and Sexuality in Latin America  

Krista Van Vleet.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Focuses on family, gender, and sexuality as windows onto political, economic, social, and cultural issues in Latin America. Topics include indigenous and natural gender ideologies, marriage, race, and class; machismo and masculinity; state and domestic violence; religion and reproductive control; compulsory heterosexuality; AIDS; and cross-cultural conceptions of homosexuality. Takes a comparative perspective and draws on a wide array of sources including ethnography, film, fiction, and historical narrative. (Same as: GSWS 2237, LAS 2737)

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101 or SOC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

ANTH 2830  (b, IP)    Descendants of the Sun: The Inca and their Ancestors  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Considers the Inca figure in contemporary imaginations, from mummies to archaeological sites like Machu Picchu. This course examines 12,000 years of cultural change in the Andean region of South America. Situates the Inca, perhaps the most well-known of the early civilizations that predated the European invasion, in relation to other cultures, including the Chavin, Paracas, Moche, Nasca, Wari, Tiwanaku, and Chimu. Topics include the peopling of South America; early religious traditions; cultural adaptations to mountainous and desert environments; origins and development of agriculture; domestication of llamas and alpacas; rise and fall of states; imperial expansion; artistic expression; architectural traditions; treatment of the dead and ancestor veneration; and Spanish colonization. Considers both archaeological and ethnohistorical research from the region that includes Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Chile, and Argentina. Includes opportunities to work with artifacts from the region.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1000 - 2969 or ANTH 3000 or higher or LAS 1000 - 2969 or LAS 3000 or higher or ARCH 1000 - 2969 or ARCH 3000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

ANTH 2840  (b, ESD)   Contemporary Issues of Native North America  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Explores contemporary Native American issues within and beyond tribal nations. Topics may include sovereignty and decolonization, federal policy, cultural appropriation, gaming and casinos, blood quantum, the repatriation of human remains and objects, language revitalization, comedy, and the little-known history of Native Americans' influence on rock and roll. Throughout, we emphasize Indigenous-produced scholarship and media. Brings attention to tribal nations in Maine as well as the significance of recent political mobilizations in relation to the long history of Native activism.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101 or ANTH 1102 or ANTH 1103.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

ANTH 2850  (b, ESD)   Indigenous Societies of Australia and New Zealand  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Surveys the contemporary social, economic, and political issues facing native peoples of Australia and New Zealand. Explores a range of indigenous Australian and Maori forms of social being historically, geographically, and methodologically. Through an examination of diverse source materials--such as ethnographic texts, art, novels, autobiographies, films, television, new media, and museum exhibitions--considers the ways that native identity has been constructed and challenged since the eighteenth century. Investigates the relationships between indigenous sovereignty, the nation state, and cultural production.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101 or SOC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

ANTH 2860  (b, IP)   Pacific Resistance: Indigenous Responses to Capitalism and Colonialism in Oceania  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

The islands of the Pacific were settled by indigenous peoples long before Europeans first arrived in the region. Explores how Pacific Islanders experienced their encounters with European imperial powers. From historical accounts of Hawaiian chiefs and Fijian warriors to ethnographic accounts of Trobriand Island cricket players and Chamorro activists on Guam, traces the strategies of resistance to colonialism and capitalism that have come to define indigenous ways of life in the Pacific. Through attention to the cultural particularities of the region, uses accounts of indigenous resistance to explore new approaches to issues of social justice and self-determination.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101 or SOC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

ANTH 3010  (b)   Contemporary Issues in Anthropology  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Close readings of recent ethnographies and other materials are used to examine current theoretical and methodological developments and concerns in anthropology.

Prerequisites: Four of: either ANTH 1150 or ANTH 1102 and either ANTH 2010 or ANTH 2020 and ANTH 1101 and ANTH 2030.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

ANTH 3100  (b, ESD, IP)   Global Sexualities/Local Desires  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Explores the variety of practices, performances, and ideologies of sexuality through a cross-cultural perspective. Focusing on contemporary anthropological scholarship on sexuality and gender, asks how Western conceptions of sexuality, sex, and gender help (or hinder) understanding of the lives and desires of people in other social and cultural contexts. Topics may include third gendered individuals; intersexuality and the naturalization of sex; language and the performance of sexuality; drag; global media and the construction of identity; lesbian and gay families; sex work; AIDS and HIV and health policy; migration, asylum, and human rights issues; ethical issues and activism. Ethnographic examples are drawn from United States, Latin America (Brazil, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Argentina, Cuba); Asia (India, Japan, Indonesia) and Oceania (Papua New Guinea); and Africa (Nigeria, South Africa). Presents issues of contemporary significance along with key theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches used by anthropologists. Integrates perspectives on globalization and the intersection of multiple social differences (including class, race, and ethnicity) with discussion of sexuality and gender. Not open to students with credit in Anthropology 210.

Prerequisites: Two of: ANTH 1101 or SOC 1101 and ANTH 2000 - 2969.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

ANTH 3210  (b)   Animal Planet: Humans and Other Animals  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Cultures around the world maintain different stances about non-human animals. People eat meat or avoid doing so. Religions advocate veneration, fear, or loathing of certain animals. Domesticated animals provide us company, labor, and food. Wild animals are protected, studied, photographed, captured, and hunted. Animals inhabit novels, are featured in art, and adorn merchandise. Students read ethnographies, articles, animal rights literature, and children’s books; study museum collections; and examine animal themes in films and on the Web. Employing anthropological perspectives, students consider what distinguishes humans from other animals, how cultures are defined by people’s attitudes about animals, and what might be our moral and ethical responsibilities to other creatures.

Prerequisites: Two of: either ANTH 1101 or ANTH 1150 and ANTH 2000 - 2969.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

ANTH 3215  (b, ESD)   The Anthropology of Art  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

The aim of this course is two-fold: one, to introduce the student to the “classic” literature within the anthropology of art and to chart the development and interests of this sub-discipline of anthropology; and two, to use this material to develop an “anthropological” perspective on art that can be used as a key form of critical inquiry into diverse art forms. Topics to be discussed include the idea of aesthetics in cross-cultural context; the entanglement of primitivism and modernity; the role of class and taste in appreciating art; art and value in the marketplace; art and museum practice; tourist art and the value of authenticity; and colonial and postcolonial art.

Prerequisites: Two of: ANTH 1101 and ANTH 2000 - 2969.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2017.

ANTH 3222  (b)   Cultural Performances  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

"Cultural performances" include many media not normally thought of as performative in the West. The term covers not only drama, dance and music, but also such cultural media as ritual, literature, sport and celebration. Approaches performances in three ways: examines what they reveal about a culture, to both natives and outsiders; considers what social, psychological and political effects they can have on participants and their societies; and investigates what methods have been used to study performance. Special attention will be paid to audiences, and to their reception and uses of symbolic material.

Prerequisites: Two of: either ANTH 2000 - 2969 or either SOC 2000 - 2969 or ANTH 3000 or higher or SOC 3000 or higher and ANTH 1101 or SOC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

ANTH 3250  (b, ESD, IP)   Landscapes of Power: Culture, Place, and the Built Environment  

Lauren Kohut.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Explores spaces, landscapes, and the built environment as arenas for producing, reproducing, and contesting relationships of power and authority. Human beings transform and are transformed by their physical surroundings, and relationships between people and places are shaped by culture, history, identity, and politics. Drawing on critical theories from anthropology, cultural geography, and related fields, students examine the intersections of space, place, and power using case studies from a variety of cultural and historical contexts. Considers how relationships of inequality become embedded in the landscape and the built environment. Topics include state violence, gated communities, colonialism, borders and borderlands, racial segregation, and gendered spaces.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101 or SOC 1101 or ANTH 2000 - 2999.

ANTH 3320  (b)   Youth in Global Perspective  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Explores research on children as a window into issues of individual agency and social, political, and economic inequality in the contemporary world. Children move between families, communities, and nations; claim belonging to divergent communities; create distinct identities; and navigate hierarchies. Highlights the circulation of children as structured by broad relationships of power. Forefronts youth as social actors. Considers culturally specific notions of childhood and methodological and ethical implications of research with children. Topics include adoption, migration, human trafficking, child labor, tourism, and social movements in the Americas, Asia, Oceania, and/or Africa. (Same as: LAS 3720)

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101 or SOC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.