Bowdoin College Catalogue and Academic Handbook

Asian Studies (ASNS)

ASNS 1007  (c, FYS)   Food and Foodways in China: A Cultural History  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

A cultural history of what, when, why, and how people eat in China. Explores a history of Chinese food, and more importantly, a history of China through its food. Structured around four historical periods (antiquity, middle period, late imperial, and modern), studies the connections between food and agriculture, politics, religion, health, technology, and literature. From one perspective, examines foodways in China as cultural constructs and introduces topics such as the human adaptation, experimentation, knowledge formation, technological development, cultural appropriation, and value judgment of food. From another, discusses the material aspects of a culinary history, e.g., the biological facts, ecological sensitivities, environmental adaptation, and historical evolution of foodstuffs. In correspondence with the four historical periods, provides opportunities to prepare and eat four meals, each of them designed to convey a broader sense of historical context. The meals include: Han aristocrat’s feast (ancient), Song literati party (middle period), Hubei peasant meal (late imperial), and American Chinese takeout (modern). Meals are scheduled on Friday afternoons throughout the semester (not on regular class-meeting days). Attendance at these meals is not mandatory, but provide additional context and experience. Taken together, students are encouraged to reflect both on what food tells us about Chinese history, and how it causes us to reflect on our own everyday lives. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors.. (Same as: HIST 1037)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

ASNS 1020  (c, FYS)   Japanese Animation: History, Culture, Society  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Animation is a dominant cultural force in Japan and perhaps its most important cultural export. Examines the ways Japanese animation represents Japan's history and society and the diverse ways in which it is consumed abroad. How does animation showcase Japanese views of childhood, sexuality, national identity, and gender roles? How does its mode of story-telling build upon traditional pictorial forms in Japan? Focuses on the aesthetic, thematic, social, and historical characteristics of Japanese animation films; provides a broad survey of the place of animation in twentieth-century Japan. Films include “Grave of Fireflies,” “Spirited Away,” “Ghost in the Shell,” “Akira,” and “Princess Kaguya.”

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2015.

ASNS 1026  (c, FYS)   Religion and Identity in Modern India  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines dynamic interrelationships between religious beliefs, practices, codes of behavior, organizations, and places and identity in India. Surveys religious texts, such as the Bhagavad Gita and the Qur’an, which have shaped India’s competing political identities, and studies nationalist and revivalist movements leading up to India’s independence. Culminates in a role-playing game set in 1945 India, which uses innovative methodology called Reacting to the Past. Students argue in character adhering to religious and political views of historical figures to improve their skills in speaking, writing, critical thinking, problem solving, leadership, and teamwork. (Same as: REL 1010)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

ASNS 1036  (c, FYS)   Commodity Life: Objects and Histories of India  

Every Fall. Enrollment limit: 16.  

What kinds of meanings and histories are held within objects? Uses the lens of four objects in the Indian subcontinent—rice, textiles, yoga, and photography—to trace histories of knowledge and skill, of commodification and global circulation, of power relations, and of personal attachments that these objects have generated. Central is thinking through the creative but also power-laden processes of making, using, and interpreting. This approach to the creative potential of analysis infuses class writing, revision, and discussion. Note:This course is part of the following field(s) of study: South Asia. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 1039)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

ASNS 1041  (c, FYS)   Asian Dystopias  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Focuses on contemporary dystopian novels by Asian and Asian diaspora writers. Explores the idea that dystopic fiction works not simply by reimagining time and forecasting bleak futures but also by remapping political spaces and redrawing social boundaries. Anarchists and vigilantes, aliens and clones, murderous children and mythic animal deities populate these worlds as writers examine totalitarianism and dissidence, globalization and labor slavery, pandemics and biotechnology, race riots and environmental devastation. (Same as: ENGL 1013)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

ASNS 1042  (c, FYS)   Dystopian Americas  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Explores recent dystopian fiction by multicultural writers in English who imagine America’s near futures. While the dystopian genre has long been used to challenge prevailing power structures, we focus on works that further feature minority protagonists, combining examinations of race and ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class in relation to contemporary themes of climate change, immigration, terrorism, globalization, and biotechnology. Authors include Margaret Atwood, Octavia Butler, Omar El Akkad, Chang-rae Lee, and Sabrina Vourvoulias. Also introduces the fundamentals of college-level writing, from a review of grammar and mechanics to discussions of textual analysis, thesis development, organizational structure, evidence use, synthesis of critics, and research methods. (Same as: ENGL 1015)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

ASNS 1043  (c, FYS)   East Asian Genre Cinema: The Martial Arts  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Explores East Asian cinema from a genre perspective with a focus on transnational martial arts films. The course calls on social-cultural history and genre theory in examining the form and content of such films. The role of local/global and national/transnational relations in cinema is considered. And genre-specific issues, such as spectators’ perception or industry practices, are studied to discern the role of gender, nation, power, and historiography. After taking the course, students will be able to explain the theoretical concepts of genre cinema, analyze the genre’s visual formation, and comprehend the social-cultural implications of the genre. (Same as: CINE 1043)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

ASNS 1046  (b, FYS)   Global Media and Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines the impact of media including the Internet, newspapers, and television, on politics and society in cross-national perspective. Asks how differences in the ownership and regulation of media affect how news is selected and presented, and looks at various forms of government censorship and commercial self-censorship. Also considers the role of the media and “pop culture” in creating national identities, perpetuating ethnic stereotypes, and providing regime legitimation; and explores the impact of satellite television and the Internet on rural societies and authoritarian governments. (Same as: GOV 1026)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

ASNS 1560  (c, IP)   Merchants, Mughals, Mendicants: India and the Early Modern World  

Rachel Sturman.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 50.
  

Introductory exploration of the history of the Indian subcontinent and its connections to the broader world in an era shaped by the vibrant movement of people, goods, and ideas across the Indian Ocean, Europe, and Central Asia. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: South Asia. It also fulfills the non Euro/US and pre-modern requirements for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 1440)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

ASNS 1770  (c, IP)   Epics Across Oceans  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 50.  

Introduces students to the classic Indian epics that form a core literary and cultural tradition within South and Southeast Asia: the Ramayana and the Mahabharata. Examines how the epics were adapted across different kingships and polities in South and Southeast Asia, becoming part of the traditional culture of almost every part of this vast region. Since the royal patrons and the heroes of these epics were often linked, the manner in which the epics were told reveals the priorities of the different regions. Drawing on film, graphic novels, and multiple performance genres, explores the continuous reworking of these epics for both conservative and radical ends, from ancient India to the present day. (Same as: REL 1188)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

ASNS 2002  (c, ESD, IP)   The Foundations of Chinese Thought  

Ya Zuo.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Seminar. Addresses Chinese thought from the time of Confucius, ca. sixth century B.C.E., up to the beginning of the Common Era. The first half of the time period nurtured many renowned thinkers who devoted themselves to the task of defining and disseminating ideas. The latter half witnessed the canonization of a number of significant traditions, including Confucianism. Major problems that preoccupied the thinkers include order and chaos, human nature, the relationship between man and nature, among others. Students instructed to treat philosophical ideas as historically conditioned constructs and to interrogate them in contexts. Note: This course is part of the following filed(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the pre-modern and non Euro/US requirements for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 2780)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2017.

ASNS 2005  (c, IP)   Science, Technology, and Society in China  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Examines Chinese science, technology, and medicine in the cultural, intellectual, and social circumstances. The first part surveys a selection of main fields of study in traditional Chinese science and technology, nodal points of invention and discovery, and important conceptual themes. The second part tackles the clash between traditional Chinese natural studies and modern science from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries. Prominent themes include astronomy and court politics, printing technology and books, and the dissemination of Western natural science, among others. Reading materials reflect an interdisciplinary approach and include secondary literature on cultural, intellectual history, ethnography, and the sociology of scientific knowledge. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 2781)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

ASNS 2010  (c, IP)   The Emergence of Chinese Civilization  

Ya Zuo.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Introduction to ancient Chinese history (2000 B.C.E. to 800 C.E.). Explores the origins and foundations of Chinese civilization. Prominent themes include the inception of the imperial system, the intellectual fluorescence in classical China, the introduction and assimilation of Buddhism, the development of Chinese cosmology, and the interactions between early China and neighboring regions. Class discussion of historical writings complemented with literary works and selected pieces of the visual arts. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors. (Same as: HIST 2320)

ASNS 2011  (c, ESD, IP)   Late Imperial China  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Introduction to late imperial China (800 to 1800) as the historical background to the modern age. Begins with the conditions shortly before the Golden Age (Tang Dynasty) collapses, and ends with the heyday of the last imperial dynasty (Qing Dynasty). Major topics include the burgeoning of modernity in economic and political patterns, the relation between state and society, the voice and presence of new social elites, ethnic identities, and the cultural, economic, and political encounters between China and the West. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the pre-modern and non Euro/US requirements for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 2321)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017.

ASNS 2012  (c, IP)   China’s Path to Modernity: 1800 to Present  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Introduction to modern and contemporary Chinese history. Covers the period from the nineteenth century, when imperial China encountered the greatest national crisis in its contact with the industrial West, to the present People's Republic of China. Provides historical depth to an understanding of the multiple meanings of Chinese modernity. Major topics include: democratic and socialist revolutions; assimilation of Western knowledge and thought; war; imperialism; the origin, development, and unraveling of the Communist rule. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 2322)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018.

ASNS 2020  (c, IP, VPA)   Power and Politics in Pre-modern Chinese Art  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Introduces students to Chinese art from the First Emperors terracotta warriors in the third century BCE to the waning of the country’s dynastic history in the nineteenth century CE. Following a chronological sequence, explores key mortuary spaces, religious objects, court art, and landscape painting with focus on themes of power and politics. Emphasis is placed on understanding changing art formats and functions in relation to socio-cultural contexts, such as shifts in belief systems, foreign imperial patronage, and the rise of literati expression. Readings include primary sources such as ancestral rites, Buddhist doctrines, imperial proclamations, and Chinese painting treatises. (Same as: ARTH 2710)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2016.

ASNS 2050  (c, ESD, IP)   Writing China from Afar  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 35.  

The telling of a nation’s history is often the concern not only of historical writings but also literary ones. Examines contemporary diaspora literature on three shaping moments of twentieth-century China: the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945), the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976), and the 1989 Tiananmen democracy movement and massacre. Focuses on authors born and raised in China but since dispersed into various Western locales, particularly the United States, England, and France. Critical issues include the role of the Chinese diaspora in the historiography of World War II, particularly the Nanjing Massacre; the functions and hazards of Chinese exilic literature, such as the genre of Cultural Revolution memoirs, in Western markets today; and more generally, the relationship between history, literature, and the cultural politics of diasporic representations of origin. Authors may include Shan Sa, Dai Sijie, Hong Ying, Yan Geling, Zheng Yi, Yiyun Li, Gao Xingjian, Ha Jin, Annie Wang, and Ma Jian. (Same as: ENGL 2752)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2015.

ASNS 2060  (b, IP)   Contemporary Chinese Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the history and politics of China in the context of a prolonged revolution. Begins by examining the end of imperial rule, the development of Modern China, socialist transformations and the establishment of the PRC. After a survey of the political system as established in the 1950s and patterns of politics emerging from it, the analytic focus turns to political change in the reform era (since 1979) and the forces driving it. The adaptation by the Communist Party to these changes and the prospects of democratization are also examined. Topics include political participation and civil society, urban and rural China, gender in China, and the effects of post-Mao economic reform. (Same as: GOV 2440)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2016.

ASNS 2061  (b, IP)   U.S. - China Relations  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the development of United States relations with China. Begins with a brief historical examination of the Opium War, then examines United States policy towards the Nationalists and the Communists during the Chinese Civil War. In the aftermath of the civil war and subsequent revolution, the role of China in the Cold War will be discussed. Then focuses on more contemporary issues in United States-China relations, drawing links between the domestic politics of both countries and how they influence the formulation of foreign policy. Contemporary issues addressed include human rights, trade, the Taiwanese independence movement, nationalism, and China’s growing economic influence in the world. (Same as: GOV 2540)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

ASNS 2071  (c, IP)   China's Urbanization: Art and Architecture  

Shu-chin Tsui.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Explores visual cultural trends in modern China with socialist and post-socialist conditions as the contextual setting and visual cultural studies the theoretical framework. Discussion topics include but not limited to the following: architecture, from the Imperial Palace to the Bird’s Nest stadium; art, from socialist realism to post-socialist experiment; advertising, from Shanghai modern to global consumerism; and digital media, from the Internet to bloggers. Questions central to the course ask how visual cultural trends reflect and react to China’s social-economic transitions, and how the state apparatus and the people participate in cultural production and consumption. This is a research-oriented course. Students gain knowledge about contemporary Chinese culture as well as skills in the critical analysis of cultural artifacts and trends.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

ASNS 2072  (c, IP, VPA)   History and Memory: China's Cultural Revolution through Film  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines China’s Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) through the lens of cinema. Viewed as one of the most destructive mass movements in China’s modern history, the CR dramatically shaped national politics and deeply affected the life of ordinary people. With film productions made during and after the CR as primary materials, the course seeks to explain the nature of the Cultural Revolution as well as how motion pictures (re)construct CR rhetoric and why the CR remains a source of trauma that haunts the memories of those who experienced it. Popular film titles such as "The White Haired Girl", "To Live", "Farewell My Concubine", and others will lead students on a journey through history via the cinemas of socialist model operas, post-socialist retrospections, and alternative re-constructions. The course aims to be intellectually thought-provoking and cinematically engaging. It fulfills the minor in Cinema Studies and Chinese as well as the major in Asian Studies. Neither a prerequisite nor knowledge of the Chinese language is required. Note: Fulfills the non-US cinema requirement for cinema studies minors. (Same as: CINE 2254)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

ASNS 2074  (c, IP)   Gendered Bodies: Toward a Women's Art in Contemporary China  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Introduces students to an emerging subject that has yet to receive much attention from art critics or from scholars. Taking the body, especially the female body, as a discursive subject and visual medium, examines how women artists, through their artistic innovations and visual representations, search for forms of self-expression characterized by female aesthetics and perspectives. Included among topics covered are personal experience and history, sexuality and the gaze, pain and memory, and landscape aesthetics and the body. Examines how different visual media—such as painting, photography, installation, performance art, and video work—play a role in the development of women’s art in contemporary China. (Same as: GSWS 2605)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

ASNS 2075  (c, IP, VPA)   Ecocinema: China's Ecological and Environmental Crisis  

Shu-chin Tsui.
Every Other Spring. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Examines how China’s economic development has caused massive destruction to the natural world and how environmental degradation affects the lives of ordinary people. An ecological and environmental catastrophe unfolds through the camera lens in feature films and documentaries. Central topics include the interactions between urbanization and migration, humans and animals, eco-aesthetics and manufactured landscapes, local communities and globalization. Considers how cinema, as mass media and visual medium, provides ecocritical perspectives that influence ways of seeing the built environment. The connections between cinema and environmental studies enable students to explore across disciplinary as well as national boundaries. Note: Fulfills the non-US cinema requirement and the film theory requirement for cinema studies minors. (Same as: CINE 2075, ENVS 2475)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

ASNS 2076  (c, IP)   Fashion and Gender in China  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines how the dress women wear and the fashion consumers pursuit reflect social-cultural identities and generate gender politics. Readings and discussions span historical periods, geographical locations, social-cultural groups, and identity categories. From bound feet to the Mao suit, and from qipao to wedding gowns, fashion styles and consumer trends inform a critical understanding of the nation, gender, body, class, and transnational flows. Topics include the intersections between foot-binding and femininity, qipao and the modern woman, the Mao suit and the invisible body, beauty and sexuality, oriental chic and re-oriental spectacle. With visual materials as primary source, and fashion theory the secondary, offers an opportunity to gain knowledge of visual literacy and to enhance analytical skills. (Same as: GSWS 2076)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2016.

ASNS 2200  (c, IP, VPA)   Art and Revolution in Modern China  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the multitude of visual expressions adopted, re-fashioned, and rejected from China's last dynasty (1644-1911) through the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976). Major themes include the tension between identity and modernity, Westernization, the establishment of new institutions for art, and the relationship between cultural production and politics. Formats under study include ink painting, oil painting, woodcuts, advertisements, and propaganda. Comparisons with other cultures conducted to interrogate questions such as how art mobilizes revolution. (Same as: ARTH 2200)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

ASNS 2201  (c, IP, VPA)   From Mao to Now: Contemporary Chinese Art  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the history of contemporary Chinese art and cultural production from Mao’s Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) until today. Traces experiments in oil, ink, performance, installation, video, and photography and considers these media and formats as artistic responses to globalization, capitalist reform, urbanization, and commercialization. Tracks themes such as art and consumerism, national identity, global hierarchies, and political critique. Readings include primary sources such as artists’ statements, manifestoes, art criticism, and curatorial essays. (Same as: ARTH 2210)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

ASNS 2252  (c, ESD, IP)   Culture and Conquest in Japan: An Introductory History to 1800  

Every Year. Enrollment limit: 35.  

How did Japan become Japan? This course introduces the origins of Japan from the archeological record until industrial modernity. Lectures survey the unification of Japan under a court-centered state, the rise and demise of the samurai as its ruling order, and the archipelago's shifting relationship to the larger world. We will not only focus on the culture of conquest by the warrior class, but also conquest via culture as inhabitants of the archipelago transferred and transformed material commodities, knowledge systems, and sacred beliefs from beyond its horizons. Readings emphasize voices that comment on gender, status, religion, science, and nature. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It also meets the pre-modern and non euro/us requirements for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 2420)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Fall 2015.

ASNS 2270  (c, IP)   The Fantastic and Demonic in Japanese Literature  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

From possessing spirits and serpentine creatures to hungry ghosts and spectral visions, Japanese literary history is alive with supernatural beings. The focus of study ranges from the earliest times to modernity, examining these motifs in both historical and theoretical contexts. Readings pose the following broad questions: How do representations of the supernatural function in both creation myths of the ancient past and the rational narratives of the modern nation? What is the relationship between liminal beings and a society’s notion of purity? How might the uncanny return of dead spirits in medieval Japanese drama be understood? How does the construction of demonic female sexuality vary between medieval and modern Japan? Draws on various genres of representation, from legends and novels to drama, paintings, and cinema. Students develop an appreciation of the hold that creatures from the other side maintain over cultural and social imagination. (Same as: GSWS 2236)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2016.

ASNS 2271  (c, IP, VPA)   Samurai in History, Literature, and Film  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

An examination of representations of samurai in historical, literary, and filmic texts from the twelfth to the twentieth century. Topics include the changing understanding of the way of the warrior, the influence of warrior culture on the arts in medieval Japan, and the modern appropriation of the martial arts. Analyzes the romanticizing of samurai ethos in wartime writings and the nostalgic longing for a heroic past in contemporary films. Focus on the reimagining of the samurai as a cultural icon throughout Japanese history and the relationship of these discourses to gender, class, and nationalism. Readings include the “Tale of the Heike,” “Legends of the Samurai,” “Hagakure and Bushido: The Soul of Japan.” Films may include “Genroku Chushingura,” Akira Kurosawa’s “Seven Samurai,” and the animation series “Samurai 7.”

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2016.

ASNS 2291  (c, IP, VPA)   Gender in Japanese Art  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Uses gender as a point of departure for examining works of art in the Japanese tradition. Addresses a variety of theoretical approaches and considers the varying interpretations of gender through time and across cultures, as well as issues associated with applying contemporary gender theory to pre-modern works. Chronological topics from the thirteenth through twentieth centuries CE include Buddhist ideas of the feminine, voyeurism in early modern woodblock prints, modern girls of the early twentieth century, and contemporary art. (Same as: ARTH 2180, GSWS 2180)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

ASNS 2292  (c, IP, VPA)   Sacred Arts of Japan  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Introduces religious artworks of Japan from the sixth century to the present day. Following a chronological sequence, examines artwork from Buddhist, Shinto, and Christian belief systems. Investigates two-dimensional works, sculpture, and architecture. Explores topics such as the relationship between ritual practice and the visual arts, images of heaven and hell, hidden icons, relics, and sacred and secular interactions in the visual realm. Readings taken from primary sources and scholarly articles in the field. (Same as: ARTH 2110)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

ASNS 2300  (c, ESD, IP)   Literature of World War II and the Atomic Bomb in Japan: History, Memory, and Empire  

Vyjayanthi Selinger.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

A study of Japan’s coming to terms with its imperialist past. Literary representations of Japan’s war in East Asia are particularly interesting because of the curious mixture of remembering and forgetting that mark its pages. Postwar fiction delves deep into what it meant for the Japanese people to fight a losing war, to be bombed by a nuclear weapon, to face surrender, and to experience Occupation. Sheds light on the pacifist discourse that emerges in atomic bomb literature and the simultaneous critique directed toward the emperor system and wartime military leadership. Also examines what is missing in these narratives -- Japan’s history of colonialism and sexual slavery -- by analyzing writings from the colonies (China, Korea, and Taiwan). Tackles the highly political nature of remembering in Japan. Writers include the Nobel prize-winning author Ôe Kenzaburô, Ôoka Shôhei, Kojima Nobuo, Shimao Toshio, Hayashi Kyoko, and East Asian literati like Yu Dafu, Lu Heruo, Ding Ling, and Wu Zhou Liu.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

ASNS 2310  (c, ESD, IP)   The Japanese Empire and World War II  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Charts the sudden rise and demise of the Japanese empire in the making of modern East Asia. Once stretching from the Mongolian steppe to the South Seas mandate, the Japanese empire continues to evoke controversy to this day. Discussions call attention to competing imperial visions, which challenged the coherence of the project as a whole. Primary sources introduce the lived experience of various individuals—emperors and coolies alike—who both conquered and capitulated to the imperial regime. Topics covered include settler colonialism, independence movements, transnational labor, fascist ideology, environmental warfare, the conundrum of collaboration, and war trials. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the non euro/us requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 2890)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

ASNS 2311  (c, ESD, IP)   Modernity and Identity in Japan  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

In 1853, Commodore Matthew Perry sailed to Japan with four naval warships and issued an ultimatum: open up to trade or face foreign invasion. Charts Japan’s swift emergence from its feudal origins to become the world’s first non-Western, modern imperial power out of its feudal origins. Lectures introduce the origins, course, and consequences of building a modern state from the perspective of various actors that shaped its past: rebellious samurai, anarchist activists, the modern girl, imperial fascists, and office salarymen. Readings complicate dichotomies of East and West, modern and feudal, nation and empire through the lens of ethnicity, class, and gender. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the non euro/us requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 2421)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016.

ASNS 2320  (b, ESD, IP)   Japanese Politics and Society  

Henry Laurence.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Comprehensive overview of modern Japanese politics in historical, social, and cultural context. Analyzes the electoral dominance of the Liberal Democratic Party, the nature of democratic politics, and the rise and fall of the economy. Other topics include the status of women and ethnic minorities, education, war guilt, nationalism, and the role of the media. (Same as: GOV 2450)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

ASNS 2321  (b, IP)   Global Media and Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the interconnections between media, politics and society in cross-national perspective. Explores national differences in issues such as free speech policy; privacy rights; censorship and self-censorship; news production and consumption; and the role of public broadcasters such as the BBC and NHK. Also considers the role of pop culture in shaping national identities and creating diplomatic "soft power." Cases drawn primarily but not exclusively from the UK, Japan and the USA. (Same as: GOV 2446)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

ASNS 2330  (c, IP, VPA)   Culture and Crisis in Modern and Contemporary Japanese Art  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

In the late nineteenth and throughout the twentieth century, as Japan transitioned from a feudal society to a modern nation-state, Japanese art was mobilized by the avant-gardes and government alike. Examines the wide variety of formats and mediums encompassed in competing claims for modernization, including ink painting, oil painting, photography, ceramics, woodblock prints, and performance art. Interrogates art's complicit role in ultra-nationalism, Pan-Asianism, Oriental Orientalism, colonial ambitions, US military occupation, and post-war reconstruction. Themes covered include: reinventions of tradition, East-West relations, colonialism, trauma, and renewal. (Same as: ARTH 2190)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

ASNS 2402  (c, IP, VPA)   Japanese Popular Culture in Literature and Art  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Introduces students to the world of popular culture in contemporary Japan. With an eye upon historical and social contexts, explores a wide variety of media—manga (comics), anime (animation), literature, and art—and the role of pop culture in daily life, fashion, film, and music. Considers the interplay of Japan’s popular culture with that of its East Asian neighbors and Japan’s prominence within the global pop-mediascape. Topics include Miyazaki Hayao and environmentalism, gender roles and mobility, the self and subjectivities, idealized worlds and character tropes, disaster and recovery, and the rural-urban divide. No knowledge of Japanese required.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

ASNS 2403  (c, ESD, IP)   Japanese Science and Mystery Fiction  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

A trans-media survey of modern Japanese science and mystery fiction in literature, film, anime, and manga. Explores individual dreams, social nightmares, and the dynamics of utopia, ideology, dystopia, and futurism. Devotes considerable attention to the ways in which these genres respond to social forces, address disasters of natural and human origin, and contemplate the human relationship with science and technology, criminal justice, imagined worlds, and future panics. Also considers theoretical approaches to media studies and the historical and cultural context from which the selected texts have emerged.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

ASNS 2501  (c, IP)   Construction of Goddess and Deification of Women in Hindu Tradition  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Focuses include an examination of the manner in which the power of the feminine has been expressed mythologically and theologically in Hinduism; how various categories of goddesses can be seen or not as the forms of the “great goddess”; and how Hindu women have been deified, a process that implicates the relationship between the goddess and women. Readings may include primary sources, biographies and myths of deified women, and recent scholarship on goddesses and deified women. (Same as: GSWS 2289, REL 2289)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

ASNS 2550  (c, ESD, IP)   Religion and Fiction in Modern South Asia  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Explains the nexus between religion and society in modern South Asia via the prism of South Asian literature in English. Confined to prose fiction, considering its tendency to attempt approximations of reality. Interrogates how ideas of religion and ideas about religion manifest themselves in literature and affect understanding of south Asian religions among its readership. Does not direct students to seek authentic insights into orthodox or doctrinal religion in the literary texts but to explore the tensions between textual religion and everyday lived reality in South Asia. (Same as: REL 2219)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2016.

ASNS 2551  (c, IP)   Mahayana Buddhism  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Studies the emergence of Mahayana Buddhist worldviews as reflected in primary sources of Indian, Chinese, and Japanese origins. Buddhist texts include the Buddhacarita (Life of Buddha), the Platform Sutra of the Sixth Patriarch, the Prajnaparamitra-hrdaya Sutra (Heart Sutra of the Perfection of Wisdom), the Saddharmapundarika Sutra (the Lotus Sutra), the Sukhavati Vyuha (Discourse on the Pure Land), and the Vajraccedika Sutra (the Diamond-Cutter), among others. (Same as: REL 2223)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2017, Spring 2016.

ASNS 2552  (c, IP)   Hindu Literatures  

Claire Robison.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

In this exploration of Hindu texts, we delve into some of the most ancient and beloved literature from the Indian subcontinent. Students read major scriptural sources, including the Vedas and Upanishads. In our study of the epics (the Ramayana and the Mahabharata, including the Bhagavad Gita), we discuss translations from Sanskrit and popular retellings of these stories into other languages and media. We discuss the Puranas, reading the story of the warrior Goddess in the Devi Mahatmyam and investigate visual representations of gods and goddesses. We also sample Sanskrit classical poetry and devotional literature to the Goddess translated from Bengali. (Same as: REL 2220)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2016.

ASNS 2553  (c, IP)   Hindu Cultures  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

A consideration of various types of individual and communal religious practice and A consideration of various types of individual and communal religious practice and religious expression in Hindu tradition, including ancient ritual sacrifice, mysticism and yoga (meditation), dharma and karma (ethical and political significance), pilgrimage (as inward spiritual journey and outward ritual behavior), puja (worship of deities through seeing, hearing, chanting), rites of passage (birth, adolescence, marriage, and death), etc. Focuses on the nature of symbolic expression and behavior as understood from indigenous theories of religious practice. Religion 2220 is recommended as a previous course. (Same as: REL 2221)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

ASNS 2554  (c, ESD, IP)   Theravada Buddhism  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

An examination of the major trajectories of Buddhist religious thought and practice as understood from a reading of primary and secondary texts drawn from the Theravada traditions of India, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Burma. (Same as: REL 2222)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2017, Fall 2015.

ASNS 2555  (c, IP)   Religious Culture and Politics in Southeast Asia  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 35.  

An examination of the ways in which changes in political economies and societies of Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand, Laos and Cambodia have fostered changes in the predominantly Theravada Buddhist religious cultures of modern Southeast Asia. Includes how civil wars in Sri Lanka and Burma, revolutions in Laos and Cambodia, and the ideology of kingship in Thailand have elicited changes in the public practice of religion. Previous credit in Religion 2222 (same as Asian Studies 2554) highly recommended. (Same as: REL 2288)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2016.

ASNS 2573  (c, ESD, IP)   Sexual Politics in Modern India  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Explores the politics of sexuality in India from the colonial era to the present day. Topics include sexual violence; arranged marriage; courtesanship and sex work; sexuality and colonialism; sexuality and nationalism, and the emergence of a contemporary lesbian/gay/queer movement. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: South Asia and Colonial Worlds. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 2801, GSWS 2259)

Prerequisites: HIST 1000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2016.

ASNS 2581  (c, ESD, IP)   The Making of Modern India and Pakistan  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Traces the history of India and Pakistan from the rise of British imperial power in the mid-eighteenth century to the present. Topics include the formation of a colonial economy and society; religious and social reform; the emergence of anti-colonial nationalism; the road to independence and partition; and issues of secularism, democracy, and inequality that have shaped post-colonial Indian and Pakistani society. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: South Asia and Colonial Worlds. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement of history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 2342)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

ASNS 2582  (c, ESD, IP)   Media and Politics in Modern India  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the new forms of politics and of popular culture that have shaped modernity in India. Topics include the emergence of mass politics, urbanization, modern visual culture, new media technologies, and contemporary media and democracy. Course includes a film component. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: South Asia and Colonial Worlds. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 2343)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2017.

ASNS 2585  (c, ESD, IP)   Global Cities, Global Slums of India  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. How have cities in the so-called "developing world" come to take their contemporary forms? How is life in these cities and slums lived? Explores these and other questions through a focus on modern India. Drawing on film, fiction, memoirs, urban planning, and other materials, examines the processes through which cities and slums have taken shape, ongoing efforts to transform them, as well as some of the diverse ways of representing and inhabiting modern urban life. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Colonial Worlds and South Asia. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 2802)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2017.

ASNS 2601  (c, IP)   Militancy and Monasticism in South and Southeast Asia  

Christine Marrewa.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Examines monastic communities throughout South and Southeast Asia and the ways they have been at the forefront of right-wing religious politics in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Across Asia, Hindu and Buddhist monks have been playing a political role that some consider contradictory to their spiritual image. Investigates how various monastic communities harness political power today, as well as how different communities in early-modern Asia used their spiritual standing and alleged supernatural powers to influence emperors and kings. (Same as: REL 2228)

ASNS 2610  (b, IP)   Saved By the Girl? Politics of Girlhood in International Development  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 35.  

In recent decades, girls’ education and empowerment has emerged as a key site for investment and advocacy. Girls are often represented as having the potential to solve wide-ranging societal issues, from poverty to terrorism. Interrogates the current focus on girls in international development by examining its cultural politics. What kinds of knowledges about people in the global south are produced in/through girl-focused campaigns? What is highlighted and what is erased? What are the consequences of such representations? Examinations lead to an exploration of the different theories of ‘girl,’ ‘culture,’ ‘empowerment,’ ‘rights,’ and ‘citizenship’ that are operative in this discourse. Situates girl-focused campaigns within the broader politics of humanitarianism and asks critical questions about conceptualizations of ‘freedom’ and the constitution of the ‘human’. To provide a more nuanced understanding of the lives of girls in the global south, brings to bear ethnographic studies from Pakistan, Egypt, India, and Nepal. (Same as: GSWS 2268)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

ASNS 2611  (b, ESD, IP)   The World’s Most Dangerous Place?: Gender, Islam, and Politics in Contemporary Pakistan  

Shenila Khoja-Moolji.
Every Other Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

The January 2008 cover image of The Economist calls Pakistan “The world’s most dangerous place.” Indeed, Pakistan has been variously called a “terrorist state,” a “failed state,” and a “lawless frontier.” This course engages in an academic study of the gender, religion, and politics in Pakistan to deepen students’ understanding of the world’s sixth-most populous country. We begin with accounts of the British colonization of South Asia and the nationalist movements that led to the creation of Pakistan. We then consider the myriad issues the nation has faced since 1947, focusing in particular on the debates surrounding gender and Islam, and Pakistan’s entanglements with the US through the Cold War and the War on Terror. In addition to historical and ethnographic accounts, the course will center a number of primary texts (with English translations) including political autobiographies, novels, and terrorist propaganda materials. Students will write a research paper as the final product. (Same as: GSWS 2271)

ASNS 2620  (b, ESD, IP)   Sociological Perspectives on Asia(ns) and Media  

Shruti Devgan.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Explores Asian national and diasporic/transnational social contexts through the lens of various media, including print, film, television, advertising, music, and digital media. Helps understand how media construct societies and cultures and, in turn, how social institutions, interactions, and identities get reflected in media. Focuses on South Asia to explore questions of ideology and power; political economy of media; construction and representations of gender, sexuality, race, social class, nation, and religion; generations; and social movements and change. (Same as: SOC 2520)

Prerequisites: Two of: either SOC 1000 - 2969 or SOC 3000 or higher and SOC 1101 or ANTH 1101.

ASNS 2651  Religion and Ecofeminism in India and Sri Lanka  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 35.  .5 Credit  

Focuses on environmental predicaments faced by disadvantaged people (especially rural women and the agrarian and tribal poor) in contemporary India and Sri Lanka. Students read and discuss case studies that illustrate how various Hindu and Buddhist religious concepts, as well as various political discourses about nationhood, have been deployed by various actors (government, business, political organizations, environmental activists, and the disadvantaged themselves) in order to legitimate or critique the exploitation and alienation of natural resources (rivers, forests, and farm lands). Students write three short essays aimed at gaining an understanding of how issues germane to environmental degradation, economic development, and eco-feminism are understood specifically within contemporary South Asian social, cultural, and political contexts. This one-half credit course meets from September 2 thru October 26. (Same as: ENVS 2451, GSWS 2300, REL 2284)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

ASNS 2739  (c, IP)   Tantric Traditions  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Developed in the Indian subcontinent in the second millennium CE, tantric traditions often used transgressive practices, which violated rules of ritual purity. Examines “esoteric” (tantric) religious traditions, which spanned the continuum between heterodox and orthodox Hinduism, Buddhism, and Daoism. Studies tantric doctrines, rituals, and cosmologies, analyzing the role of deities, mantras, yantras (ritual diagrams), mudras (ritual gestures), meditation, and visualizations in tantric ritual. Surveys scriptures, philosophical treatises, and historical and anthropological studies to discuss the rise of tantric traditions and investigate contemporary constructions of Tantra in the West. (Same as: REL 2225)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

ASNS 2740  (c, ESD, IP)   Gods, Goddesses, and Gurus: Gender and Power in South Asian Religions  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines representations of gender, divinity, and power in cosmology, mythology, literature, and society in Hinduism and esoteric tantric traditions. Delving into India’s philosophical tradition, we discuss prakṛti, the feminine principle or nature, and the male or pure spirit, puruṣa. We analyze issues of authority and gender in Sanskrit epics, the Rāmāyana and the Mahābharata, as they are retold in vernacular languages, songs, and animated films. We learn how Kālī, the most militant goddess in the Devī Māhātmyam, serves in the cause of nationalist politics and how she is “sweetened” and democratized over time. The course culminates in a role-playing game “A virtuous woman? The Abolition of Sati in India, 1829,” which uses an innovative methodology called reacting to the past (RTTP). In RTTP, students research and articulate opinions of historical players through in-character writing and speaking assignments, learning to express themselves with clarity, precision, and force. (Same as: REL 2280, GSWS 2292)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

ASNS 2745  (c, IP)   The Tigress' Snare: Gender, Yoga, and Monasticism in South and Southeast Asia  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

There is no dearth of stories regarding the dangers of women and sexuality for Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, and Nath yogis and ascetics. Texts after texts written on ancient, classical, and early modern Asian monasticism point to the evil of women and the dangers they pose to those attempting to live monastic lives. Women, however, have historically been and continue to be involved in these religious traditions. This class will examine the highly gendered worldview found within South and Southeast Asian yogic and monastic texts. Primarily reading Hindu, Nath yogi, Jain, and Buddhist canonical teachings, the class will discuss the manner in which women have historically been viewed within these religious traditions. It will then shift to look at the manner in which women have been and continue to take part in these communities in their everyday life. Through the use of both academic readings and multimedia texts, the class will examine how women navigate their roles within these male-dominated communities, their reasons for joining these communities, and the differences that exist for women within the different monastic and yogic communities. (Same as: GSWS 2745, REL 2745)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

ASNS 2750  (c, IP)   The Poetics of Emotion in China and Korea  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Explores the relationship between form and feeling through a wide variety of poetry, fiction, philosophy, and visual sources from Chinese and Korean traditions, from The Classic of Poetry to Korean pop culture. With particular attention to the premodern period, examines how classical, vernacular, and popular forms create new spaces of feeling; how particular emotions shape cultural, philosophical, and political imaginations; and how environments and spaces, both real and projected, dialogue with selfhood and subjectivity. Addresses issues of language and representation, gender and sexuality, psychology and cognition, and crosscultural translation. Authors may include Wang Wei, Cao Xueqin, Yi Yulgok, and examples from Korean drama. (Same as: ,HIST 2344)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

ASNS 2760  (c, IP)   The Buddhist Tradition and Women  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Explores and explains the position of women in Buddhist canonical texts and women in Buddhist society. Analysis and discussion focuses on the complex “separate interdependence” between the family on the one hand, and the life of the renouncer on the other. This tension lies at the heart of the Buddhist position on women. Special attention given to selected narratives of women encountering the Buddha: Patacara and Kisagotami, the two women in deep sorrow from loss in the family, and Maha-Pajapati, the first fully ordained nun in Buddhism. Considers implications for the economic roles, access to education, and religious freedom for women in contemporary (Thai) Buddhist society. (Same as: REL 2287, GSWS 2355)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

ASNS 2801  (c, ESD)   Asian American Literature  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

An introduction to the writings of Asian America and this literature's development from mid-twentieth century to the present. Focuses on the ways Asian American writers have responded to and contested dominant American discourses of Asia/Asians. Also explores the intersections of race with gender, sexuality, class, and country of origin in shifting notions of Asian American identity. Authors include Carlos Bulosan, David Henry Hwang, Maxine Hong Kingston, le thi diem thuy, Chang-rae Lee, and John Okada. (Same as: ENGL 2750)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2016.

ASNS 2802  (c, ESD, IP)   Asian Diaspora Literature of World War II  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Intermediate Seminar. Focuses on World War II as a global moment when modernity’s two sides, its dreams and nightmares, collided. Emphasis on contemporary Asian diaspora Anglophone fiction that probes the exclusions and failures of nation and empire—foundational categories of modernity—from both Western and Asian perspectives. On the one hand, World War II marks prominently the plurality of modernities in our world: as certain nations and imperial powers entered into their twilight years, others were just emerging. At the same time, World War II reveals how such grand projects of modernity as national consolidation, ethnic unification, and imperial expansion have led to consequences that include colonialism, internment camps, the atom bomb, sexual slavery, genocide, and the widespread displacement of peoples that inaugurates diasporas. Diaspora literature thus constitutes one significant focal point where modernity may be critically interrogated. (Same as: ENGL 2005)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

ASNS 2803  (c, ESD, IP)   Forbidden Capital: Contemporary Chinese and Chinese Diaspora Fiction  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

To get rich is glorious! -- so goes the slogan popularly attributed to Deng Xiaoping, who ushered 1980s China into an era of economic liberalization. Examines post-Tiananmen fiction from Mainland China as well as the diaspora that responds to, struggles with, and/or satirizes the paradoxes of socialist capitalism. Critical issues include representations of the Communist Party and the intertwined tropes of corruption and consumption, and sometimes cannibalism; debates on the democratizing promise of capital, with attention to the resurgence of nationalism and the geopolitics of the Beijing Olympics; and the new identities made possible but also problematic by this era’s massive transformations of social life, along the axes of sexuality, gender, and class. (Same as: ENGL 2756)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2016.

ASNS 2804  (c, ESD, IP)   Asian America's Aging  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Asian American literature is dominated by voices of youth: the child narrator and the bildungsroman genre have long been used by writers to tell not only personal coming-of-age stories but also that of Asian America itself, as a relative newcomer into the American nation-state and its cultural landscape. Focuses instead on the latecoming figure of the aged narrator in recent Asian American fiction, who constellates themes of dislocation and reclamation, memory, and the body rather than those of maturation and heritage. Explores old age as a vehicle for engaging contemporary issues of globalization and diaspora; historical trauma and cultural memory; life and biopolitics. Examines these works within the paradigm of transnational Asian America, which goes beyond the United States as geographical frame to shed light on the new diasporic identities and cultural politics emerging from twentieth-century global transits. (Same as: ENGL 2755)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

ASNS 2806  (c, ESD)   New Fictions of Asian America  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines developments in Asian American literature since 2000 and asks how postmillennial fictions extend earlier writings' core concerns with racial identity and national belonging in the United States. Themes and contexts include globalization and transnationalism, illegal immigration and refugee experience, the post-9/11 security state and surveillance, the expansion of Asian capital, the global financial crisis, digital technology and social media, and climate change. Considers the diverse genres and functions of Asian American literature as not simply ethnic self-writing but also social satire, political critique, historical archaeology, cultural memory, and dystopic science fiction. (Same as: ENGL 2758)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

ASNS 2807  (c, ESD)   Early Asian American Literature  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

What kinds of literature did authors of Asian descent in the US write before there was a category called Asian American literature? How did they represent the relations among America, Asia, themselves, and racial others in the decades before the civil rights movement? Examines Asian American writing from early to mid-twentieth century, before the rise of Asian American studies as a field. Studies a number of literary firsts: the first Asian American memoir, novel, and short story collection; the first poetry by Asian immigrants in the US; and the first full-length works published by writers of specific ethnic groups within Asian America. Authors may include Yan Phou Lee, Yung Wing, Sui Sin Far (Edith Maude Eaton), Onoto Watanna (Winnifred Eaton), Lin Yutang, Younghill Kang, Helena Kuo, Santha Rama Rau, Carlos Bulosan, Toshio Mori, John Okada, Louis Chu, and the Angel Island poets. (Same as: ENGL 2759)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2016.

ASNS 2830  (b, IP)   Topics on Asian Economies  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

A study of the similarities and differences in growth experience and the level of economic output per person in Asian countries. Explores possible causes of differences in economic paths, with a focus on several important economies, including China and Japan. Also discusses the relationship between the Asian economies and the United States economy. (Same as: ECON 2239)

Prerequisites: Two of: either ECON 1050 or ECON 1101 or Placement in earned ECON 1101 or Placement in ECON 2000 Level and ECON 1102 or Placement in earned ECON 1102 or Placement in ECON 2000 Level.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2016.

ASNS 2831  (c)   Religion on the Move: Religion, Migration, and Globalization  

Claire Robison.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Contemporary migration and globalization patterns have transformed where and how religious traditions are practiced, radically altering the landscape of local religion around the world. While migration has been integral to the development of many religious traditions, this course considers the role of colonialism, transnational religious networks, and the global flow of people and ideas in the creation of new religious identities. Readings highlight debates about the relation of religion to gender, ethnicity, and nationality, including the global popularity of yoga, Hindu identity in diaspora, transnational networks of Islamic learning, and changing gender norms in Buddhist monasteries. Through historical primary sources and recent ethnographies, this course focuses on questions such as: How is religious identity transformed by migration? Do religious rituals change in diaspora? And what role does religion play in shaping trends of globalization? (Same as: REL 2229)

ASNS 2839  (c)   Buddhism in America  

Joshua Urich.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Examines the two major strands of Buddhism in America: that of immigrant communities and that which is practiced by Americans without preexisting cultural ties to Buddhist traditions. After a brief introduction to Buddhism’s emergence and spread in the first millennium, readings trace the differences between these varieties of American Buddhism. Themes to be explored include temples as sources of material, emotional, and spiritual support, Buddhist practices as source of cultural identity and connection to homelands, and religious innovations and controversies among American “converts.” These latter include the poetry of Allen Ginsberg, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, and the widespread commercialization of Zen. (Same as: REL 2522)

ASNS 2855  (b, ESD, IP)   The New Scramble for Africa: Capital Accumulation in the Global  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

More than a century after European powers initially carved up the African continent during the Berlin Conference (1884–1885), Africa is again attracting the renewed attention of foreign powers interested in its extractive resources, land, markets, and positioning. The contemporary landscape differs from the “Scramble for Africa,” as it marks a shift from a solidly Western-led initiative to one in which new actors from the global south are taking on more pivotal roles. Superpowers (the United States, China, and Russia), colonial powers (UK, France, and Belgium), and less powerful states (Japan, India, and Brazil) are in competition with emerging African nations (Nigeria and South Africa) for wealth and influence on the continent. The course dedicates considerable time to exploring contemporary interactions between African states and their most significant external partner—China—considering questions of neocolonialism and neoimperialism, and asks students to conclude whether a new scramble for Africa is underway. (Same as: AFRS 2826)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

ASNS 2860  (b, IP)   Asian Communism: The Politics of China, Vietnam, North Korea, and Mongolia  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the Asian communism in China, Vietnam, North Korea, and Mongolia. Asian communism presents a series of fascinating questions. Why did communist revolutions occur in some Asian states but not others? Why were relations between some Asian communist states peaceful while others were hostile? Why did some adopt significant economic reforms while others maintained command economies? Why did communist regimes persist in most Asian states, while Communism fell in Mongolia and all of Europe? The approach of the course is explicitly comparative and structured around thematic comparisons between the four states. (Same as: GOV 2445)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

ASNS 2872  (b, IP)   The Two Koreas and Geopolitics of Northeast Asia  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the tumultuous developments on the Korean peninsula over the past century and their significance from historical, security, economic, and geopolitical perspectives. The challenges and choices facing the Korean people, their governments, neighboring countries, and the United States are assessed to understand how conditions have evolved to the high-stakes tensions that exist today, and what forces are shaping the future of both Koreas and Northeast Asia. The first half of the course considers the history of both Koreas and the conditions that underlie the modern political environment. The second half focuses on political developments of the last twenty-five years. (Same as: GOV 2550)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018.

ASNS 2874  (c, IP)   Madness in Korean Literature and Film  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Madness as a theme cuts across many literary and cultural traditions in the world, but it also takes distinct forms within Korea. Examines fiction, poetry, and film from Korea’s colonial period in the early twentieth century to the present emerging Korean pop culture industry. Explores the forms madness takes in these works and the politics of madness in Korea over the last century, including the discourse of madness around North Korea. With attention to political, economic, social, and technological forces, asks how madness illuminates problems of language and representation, gender and sexuality, and morality and cynicism. Authors may include Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Han Kang, Kim Tongni, Na Hong-jin, Park Chan-wook, O Chonghui, and Yi Sang.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

ASNS 2875  (c, IP)   Korea Beyond Borders: Contemporary Literature and Film  

John Kim.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Examines the ways in which contemporary Korean literature and film take on the world. Looks beyond received cultural and historical boundaries by exploring how the world figures within the Korean cultural imagination, as well as how Korea might fit in with the rest of the world. Drawing from, but not limited to, the fiction and films emerging after the IMF (International Monetary Fund) and Asian financial crises of the 1990s and as part of the recent global surge of Korean pop culture, follows Korean writers, filmmakers, and their characters, as they move between national borders (North/South Korea, Japan, China, Vietnam Soviet Union, Europe, Australia, and the US) and boundaries of genre, form, language, and identity. Explores themes of history and memory; relocation and dislocation; capitalism and globalism; technology and reimagining the human. Authors and filmmakers may include: Han Kang, J. M. Lee, Bong Joon-ho, Min Jin Lee, Lee Chang-dong, Kim Youngha, and Bae Suah.

ASNS 2880  (c, ESD)   Asian American History, 1850 to the Present  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Surveys the history of Asian Americans from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Explores the changing experiences of Asian immigrants and Asian Americans within the larger context of American history. Major topics include immigration and migration, race relations, anti-Asian movements, labor issues, gender relations, family and community formation, resistance and civil rights, and representations of Asian Americans in American popular culture. Readings and course materials include scholarly essays and books, primary documents, novels, memoirs, and films.This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: HIST 2161)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

ASNS 2881  (c, ESD)   Japanese American Incarceration: Removal, Redress, Remembrance  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Examines the mass imprisonment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Focuses on how historians have interpreted this episode and how Japanese Americans have remembered and reclaimed it. Topics include government justifications for incarceration, the operation of the camps, the diverse experiences of Japanese Americans, the postwar redress movement, and historical memory and commemorations. Also analyzes the political application of this history in discussions of contemporary immigration policy and social justice more broadly. Readings include secondary and primary sources, such as court cases, government documents, films, photography, art, oral histories, memoirs, and fiction. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: HIST 2641)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

ASNS 2890  (c, IP)   East Asian Environmental History, 1600-2000  

Every Other Spring. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. The Anthropocene defines an epoch in which humans have become the dominant force in shaping their environment. Examines the role of East Asia in the emergence of this new era, from the seventeenth century to the present. In debating the narrative of ecological change in China, Japan, and Korea, readings and discussions focus on how successive regimes transformed their environments, and conversely, how those environments also structured modern human society. Questions what specific political, social, and economic changes triggered the Anthropocene in East Asia; how cultural, religious, and intellectual constructs have conditioned its arrival and acceleration. Weekly topics include: commodity frontiers, environmental sustainability, public health, industrial pollution, and nuclear technology. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the non euro/us requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 2891, ENVS 2491)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016.

ASNS 2892  (c, IP)   Maps, Territory, and Power  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Maps shape nearly every facet of our modern lives, from guiding us through unfamiliar streets on smart phones to legitimizing immigration restrictions in national policy. Explores the production, meanings, and implications of maps in charting the human relationship to the environment. Examines how modern cartography, from the Mercator projection to GPS, structures nature and society as much as it reflects “objective” representations of our surroundings. Readings emphasize how this technology has also sought to exert scientific hegemony over alternate conceptions of space in non-Western contexts. Sessions include analyzing original specimens in museum collections. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the non euro/us requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 2892)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

ASNS 2900  (c, IP, VPA)   Asia in the Hollywood Imagination  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 35.  

How has Hollywood treated Asia and Asians? To what extent have Hollywood film productions engaged in either erotic fascination or racial prejudice, when presenting Asia as a cinematic setting and Asians as a cultural other? Examining Hollywood’s imaginative visions of the east, the course takes students on an exploratory journey from classic Hollywood films to contemporary blockbusters. Issues may include race and stardom in "Shanghai Express", yellowface in "Good Earth", the exotic Asian female in "The World of Suzie Wong", stereotypes of Tibetans in "Seven Years in Tibet", and an American’s perception of Tokyo in" Lost in Translation". We will also explore the Orientalist imagination through sexualized Geisha or masculinized Mulan as well as transnational crossings in the animated film "Kungfu Panda". In addition to analyzing themes and the social-cultural implications of films, the course also introduces students to the cinematic language: mise-en-scene, cinematography, and editing. Counts towards a minor in Chinese studies, as well as in cinema studies. (Same as: CINE 2078)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016.

ASNS 2920  (b, IP)   Political and Economic Development in East Asia  

Aki Nakai.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Provides an introduction to diversity and development in East Asia. The course first focuses on the rise and decline of a China- and a Japan-centric order before WWII and discusses their historical impacts on today’s domestic politics and international relations. The course then traces the postwar political economic developments. It examines the economic miracles in Asian countries and discusses their democratization. It also presents the process of Chinese economic reform and its impacts on the regional order. The course finishes with an examination of the Asian financial crisis and its impacts on regional politics. (Same as: GOV 2444)

ASNS 2921  (b, IP)   International Relations in East Asia  

Aki Nakai.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Analyzes relations between the various states in East Asia and between those states and countries outside the region, including the United States. The course addresses empirical and theoretical questions, including: What are the threats to peace and prosperity in the region, and how are the different countries responding? What explains the foreign policy strategies of different countries, including China and Japan, and how have they changed over time? How can broader theories of international relations inform, and be informed by, the nature of foreign policy choices in this region? Is East Asia headed toward greater cooperation or conflict? (Same as: GOV 2694)

ASNS 3010  (c, IP)   Neo-Confucianism  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines the so-called Neo-Confucian philosophy in historical contexts. The principle themes include ethics, cosmology, and epistemology. When most people think of Chinese philosophy, they think of philosophers from the classical period, e.g., Confucius. But these thinkers marked only the beginning of a rich and prolific philosophical tradition that continued for over two millennia. This class presents the central texts and themes of Neo-Confucianism and guides students to investigate them in the history of East Asia from 900 through early 1900s. The primary geographical focus is China, but we will also read works of important thinkers in Japan and Korea. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the pre-modern and non Euro/US requirements for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 3321)

Prerequisites: ASNS 1000 - 2969 or ASNS 3000 or higher or HIST 1000 - 2969 or HIST 3000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

ASNS 3060  (b, IP)   Capitalism and State Power in China  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 15.  

Seminar. Explores the paradoxes of contemporary China, a communist regime that boasts economic growth rates that are the envy of the world. While communism failed in Eastern Europe decades ago, the Chinese Communist Party has been surprisingly successful and leads one of the oldest dictatorships in the world. Explores how capitalism and state power actually work in China. Topics include ethnic conflict, patronage and corruption, elite politics, popular protest, elections, and civil society. Students develop and write a research paper on contemporary Chinese politics. Previous coursework in Chinese politics is not necessary. (Same as: GOV 3410)

Prerequisites: GOV 1000 - 2969 or GOV 3000 or higher or ASNS 1000 - 2969 or ASNS 3000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

ASNS 3070  (c, VPA)   Historicizing the Contemporary: Topics in Recent Chinese Art  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 12.  

Identifies and explores key topics in recent publications of contemporary Chinese art. Alongside of subject matter, students analyze usages of socio-political context and methodologies for framing different narratives of contemporary Chinese art. Through studies of individual artists and larger contemporary art trends, students unpack current art histories while also proposing alternative approaches. Readings include monographs, exhibition catalogs, interviews, and systematic reviews of journals. Questions include: What are the challenges of historicizing the present? How does the global art world reconcile the existence of multiple art worlds? How have artists intervened in narratives of contemporary Chinese art? (Same as: ARTH 3200)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2016.

ASNS 3260  (c, IP, VPA)   Japanese Prints  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 12.  

Introduces students to the breadth of Japanese print culture, from early Buddhist images to twentieth-century artworks. Explores early modern landscapes, “beautiful women,” and actor prints, as well as modern political, creative, and revival prints. Uses the collection of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art to investigate relevant artworks. Emphasis is placed on issues of economy, production, and socio-cultural contexts such as the masculine culture of early modern urban Japan, and globalization in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Chronological topics focus on the seventeenth through twentieth centuries. (Same as: ARTH 3180)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

ASNS 3300  (b, IP)   Advanced Seminar in Japanese Politics  

Every Other Spring. Enrollment limit: 15.  

Analyzes the political, social, and cultural underpinnings of modern politics and asks how democracy works in Japan compared with other countries. Explores how Japan has achieved stunning material prosperity while maintaining among the best healthcare and education systems in the world, high levels of income equality, and low levels of crime. Students are also instructed in conducting independent research on topics of their own choosing. (Same as: GOV 3400)

Prerequisites: ASNS 2320 (same as GOV 2450) or GOV 2450.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2016.

ASNS 3760  (c, IP)   Beyond Western Harmony: Composing with a Global Perspective  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 10.  

Although functional harmony is the central organizing principle of Western music, it is completely absent in other complex musical systems around the world. Considers other means of music organization and how to incorporate those concepts in students' compositions. Topics include traditional polymeter in Ewe drumming, scale construction and metric design in Indian raag and taal, Confucian philosophy in Chinese sizhu music, and colotomic organization in Javanese gamelan. (Same as: MUS 3502)

Prerequisites: MUS 2401 or MUS 2403 or MUS 2501.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

ASNS 3801  (c, ESD, IP)   Imagined Asias  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines how Asia has been represented by America and Europe and how Asian authors have responded. Draws from a wide archive of literature, theory, film, and mass culture from mid-nineteenth century to the present. Not a survey: focus on case studies that explore historical exemplars of as well as conceptual alternatives to the critical model of orientalism, which regards western depictions of Asia as necessarily reflecting the culture of empire. Issues include US racial discourses of exoticism and the yellow peril; western modernist and postmodern appropriations of “oriental” cultures for self-critiques; and strategies of hybridity, self-orientalism, and occidentalism by Asian and Asian diasporic writers and filmmakers. Possible works by Edward Said, Pierre Loti, Bret Harte, Jack London, Winnifred Eaton, David Henry Hwang, Ezra Pound, Italo Calvino, Roland Barthes, Gayatri Spivak, Rey Chow, J. G. Ballard, Kazuo Ishiguro, Amitav Ghosh, Haruki Murakami, Bei Dao, Shan Sa, Su Tong, Ang Lee, Wong Kar-wai, and Stephen Chow. (Same as: ENGL 3028)

Prerequisites: ENGL 1000 - 2969 or ENGL 3000 (same as GSWS 3000) or higher or ASNS 1000 - 2969 or ASNS 3000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2017.

ASNS 3811  (c, IP, VPA)   Art for the People: Between Propaganda and Protest in East Asia  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 12.  

Examines manifestations and mobilizations of “art for the people” from the early twentieth century to today. Focuses on ideological imperatives in modern and contemporary Chinese art and invites cross-cultural examples from East Asian democracy movements and global pop spectacle. Asks “Who are the people?” and how art has been used to define and serve them. Discussions call attention to the implication of art in politics as well as the use of art in protest. Considers artists’ tactics for intervening in institutional and ideological claims on “the people” and limitations of national and class boundaries. Topics include publicness, mass media, art school pedagogy, and social art practice. (Same as: ARTH 3210)

Prerequisites: ARTH 1000 - 2969 or ARTH 3000 or higher or ASNS 1000 - 2969 or ASNS 3000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

ASNS 3820  (c)   Law and Justice in East Asia  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines how law and justice in East Asia became markers of modernity and sovereignty from the eighteenth to twentieth centuries.The kinds of punishment used in a society often act as a measure in judging whether that society is civilized or barbaric, advanced or backward. Major themes include: stereotypes of “oriental barbarism,” torture and capital punishment, village law and gender, extraterritoriality and imperialism, sentiment and mass media, war tribunals, and thought reform. Students analyze legal documents in translation alongside recent scholarship in the field and write a major paper based on primary source research. No prior knowledge of an Asian language necessary Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the non euro/us requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 3420)

Prerequisites: ASNS 2000 - 2969 or HIST 2000 - 2969.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.