Bowdoin College Catalogue and Academic Handbook

Education (EDUC)

EDUC 1020  (c, FYS)   The Educational Crusade  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Why do you go to school? What is the central purpose of public education in the United States? Should public schools prepare students for college? The workforce? Competent citizenship? Who makes these decisions and through what policy process are they implemented? Explores the ways that public school reformers have answered such questions, from the Common School Crusaders of the early nineteenth century to present advocates of No Child Left Behind. Examining public education as both a product of social, political, and economic change and as a force in molding American society, highlights enduring tensions in the development and practice of public schooling in a democratic republic.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2016.

EDUC 1027  (c, FYS)   "To Market, To Market": Public Education and School Choice Policies  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

School choice policies have emerged in the last few decades as a way to save the “failing” public educational system. Many policy-makers have argued that the introduction of market competition into public schools will “in and of itself” spur lasting change, resulting in improved performance and more innovative practices. Critics have argued, however, that, in practice, school choice policies produce different behaviors and results than market advocates had anticipated. Examins a range of school choice policies—from open enrollment plans, to charter schools and vouchers— from a variety of different perspectives, including in-depth reviews of the roles of the parents, students, educators, schools, and policymakers. Also incorporates case studies of several districts around the country, and the choice policies they have implemented.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

EDUC 1101  (c, ESD)   Contemporary American Education  

Doris Santoro.
Every Semester. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 49.
  

What are the purposes of public education and what makes it public? Do schools serve an individual good or a collective good? Is Americas system of public education organized to serve these purposes? What is the public’s responsibility towards public education? How do current school reforms affect various stakeholders? The primary objective is to examine the cultural, social, economic, and institutional dilemmas confronting public schooling in the United States today. By approaching these dilemmas as unsolved puzzles instead of systematic failures, important insights are gained into the challenges confronting a democratic society historically committed to the public provision of education. Considers which theories and purposes of education motivate current reform efforts. Likewise, examines who shapes public discourse about public education and by what strategies. Employs a mixed approach of reading, discussion, and class-based activities to explore important educational issues including school reform and finance, charter schools, busing, vouchers, unequal educational opportunities and outcomes; and accountability, standardization, and testing.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015.

EDUC 2203  (c, ESD)   Educating All Students  

Doris Santoro.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 25.
  

An examination of the economic, social, political, and pedagogical implications of universal education in American classrooms. Focuses on the right of every student, including students with physical and/or learning differences, and those who have been identified as gifted, to an equitable education. Requires a minimum of twenty-four hours of observation in a local secondary school.

Prerequisites: EDUC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015.

EDUC 2204  (c)   Educational Policy  

Lauren Saenz.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

An examination of educational policy-making and implementation at the federal, state, and local levels. Particular attention is paid to the relationship between policy and school practice and the role practitioners play in policy-making. Policies explored include school choice, standards and accountability, No Child Left Behind, Race to the Top, the Common Core, and Proficiency-Based Instruction.

Prerequisites: EDUC 1020 or EDUC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015.

EDUC 2211  (c)   Education and the Human Condition  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Explores the relationship between education and being/becoming human. Topics may be guided by the questions: What does it mean to be an educated person? How can education lead to emancipation? How might teaching and learning lead to the good life? What is our responsibility to teach the next generation? Readings may include works by Hannah Arendt, John Dewey, W. E. B. Du Bois, Plato, Jacques Rancière, among others.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2017.

EDUC 2212  (c, ESD)   Gender, Sexuality, and Schooling  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Schools are sites where young people learn to do gender and sexuality through direct instruction, the hidden curriculum, and peer-to-peer learning. In schools, gender and sexuality are challenged, constrained, constructed, normalized, and performed. Explores instructional and curricular reforms that have attempted to address students and teachers sexual identities and behavior. Examines the effects of gender and sexual identity on students’ experience of school, their academic achievement, and the work of teaching. Topics may include compulsory heterosexuality in the curriculum, the gender of the good student and good teacher, sex ed in an age of abstinence. (Same as: GSWS 2282)

Prerequisites: EDUC 1101 or GLS 2001 or GWS 1101 or GSWS 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

EDUC 2218  (c)   Bad Teachers, Dead Poets, and Dangerous Minds: Movies about Education  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Interdisciplinary course exploring films about elementary and secondary schools such as “Dead Poets Society,” “Half-Nelson,” and “Bad Teacher”--alongside readings from film studies, cultural studies, and education. Traces the history and development of the genre and explores how teaching and learning are imagined in popular culture--with an emphasis on movies that focus on “urban” schools. Discussions focus on genre theory and change, the cultural beliefs about schooling that inform and are informed by these movies, and the genre’s depiction of race and gender in education. (Same as: CINE 2800)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

EDUC 2221  (c)   Democracy’s Citadel: Education and Citizenship in America  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the relationship between education, citizenship, and democracy in America. Questions explored include: What does public mean and how necessary is a public to democracy? Is there something democratic about how Americans choose to govern their schools? What does citizenship mean? Is education a public good with a collective economic and civic benefit, a private good with benefits to individuals whose future earnings depend on the quality of their education, or some combination of the two? What type of curriculum is most important for civic education and how should it be taught? What policies are necessary to prevent economic inequality from undermining education’s role in fostering democratic citizenship? To what extent are the concepts of education for democracy and democratic education related?

Prerequisites: EDUC 1020 or EDUC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

EDUC 2247  (c)   Gatekeepers and Barriers in Education  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the various ways that educational policies and practices enact borders and gatekeeping in schools. Pays particular attention to the lines drawn by race, class, nationality, ability, language, and gender to explore the effect of these policies on students, schools, and society more broadly. Accordingly, considers schools inclusive of public, private, K-12, and higher education. Areas of focus include tracking, financial aid, admissions, high-stakes testing, school lunch, dress codes, and gender norms.

Prerequisites: EDUC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

EDUC 2249  (c)   The Evolution of Testing and Data Use in Schools  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Traces the evolution of testing and data use in education, from the development of college entrance exams to the movement for merit-based teacher compensation. With an eye toward practical application, students will learn to analyze test and data use by applying the principles of validity and reliability that underlie educational measurement. The course addresses the diversity of ways that test data are used by teachers, students, researchers, and policymakers to inform education policy and everyday classroom practice. Topics of focus include high-stakes standardized testing, classroom assessment, data-based decision-making, large scale assessment, and teacher accountability. Students will learn to manipulate data and analyze various types of measurement instruments, and conduct research projects on topics of their choice.

Prerequisites: EDUC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

EDUC 2250  (b)   Education and Law  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 19.  

A study of the impact of the American legal system on the functioning of schools in the United States through an examination of Supreme Court decisions and federal legislation. Analyzes the public policy considerations that underlie court decisions in the field of education and considers how those judicial interests may differ from the concerns of school boards, administrators, and teachers. Issues to be discussed include constitutional and statutory developments affecting schools in such areas as free speech, sex discrimination, religious objections to compulsory education, race relations, teachers’ rights, school financing, and the education of those with disabilities. (Same as: GOV 2024)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

EDUC 2260  (c)   Science Education: Purpose, Policy, and Potential  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Why do all Americans need to learn science and what are we doing to improve science education in our schools? With the release of the Next Generation Science Standards and in response to America’s poor standing on international assessments of math and science, there has been a shift in public interest and dialogue around why and how we teach science that is reminiscent of the late 1950s after the Soviet launch of Sputnik. Considers the goals of science education in the United States and explores research and policy related to science curriculum, teaching practice, and student learning.

Prerequisites: EDUC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2016.

EDUC 2272  (c)   Urban Education and Community  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

The perspective of this course views urban schools and communities as sites of promise and innovation as well as sites for social and political struggle. Examines the significance of community involvement in urban public schools, their communities and educational policy and practice. Investigates the ways urban communities supplement educational opportunities for their youth. Topics may include "grow your own" teacher initiatives, parent trigger laws, and culturally-sustaining educational programming.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017.

EDUC 2290  (c)   Public Schools, Private Goals  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Should public schools be run like businesses? Should corporations, foundations, and philanthropists significantly influence school reform? Investigates current educational policies traditionally aligned with privatization agendas, including competition and school choice, marketing practices in schools, test-based accountability and sanctions, finance and fundraising, school closure, and standardization. Course readings review current debates on these issues; highlight the tensions between private and public interests; examine questions of equity and access in public education; and review intended and unintended policy outcomes from student, parent, and teacher perspectives.

Prerequisites: EDUC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

EDUC 2310  (c, ESD)   Separate and Unequal: Education, Race, and Democracy in the United States  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the often-fraught connection between American educational ideals and the particularly American history of race and racism. Students will analyze this changing, contested, and pivotal connection through historical and philosophical perspectives. The course focuses on pivotal moments in the history of American education such as the development and expansion of public schools in the nineteenth century, the progressive education era, and the desegregation of American public education. In each of these moments, students will explore the actions of people—black, white, thinkers, theorists, activists, litigators, students, parents, educators, and citizens—who struggled to shape American education, as well as the ways in which the ideals driving such moments were both shaped by and silent to ongoing struggles surrounding race and racism. The course will conclude by asking students to examine how race and racism continue to shape American education today. (Same as: AFRS 2620)

Prerequisites: EDUC 1101 or AFRS 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

EDUC 3301  (c)   Teaching and Learning  

Alison Riley Miller.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

A study of what takes place in classrooms: the methods and purposes of teachers, the response of students, and the organizational context. Readings and discussions help inform students’ direct observations and written accounts of local classrooms. Peer teaching is an integral part of the course experience. Requires a minimum of thirty-six hours of observation in a local secondary school. Education 3302 must be taken concurrently with this course. In order to qualify for this course students must have Education 1101 and 2203; junior or senior standing; a concentration in a core secondary school subject area (English: four courses in English; foreign language: four courses in the language; life science: four courses in biology; mathematics: four courses in mathematics; physical science: three courses in chemistry, earth and oceanographic science, or physics and one course in one of the other departments listed; or social studies: two courses in history and two courses in anthropology, economics, government, history, psychology or sociology. Permission of the instructor.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

EDUC 3302  (c)   Curriculum Development  

Alison Riley Miller.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

A study of the knowledge taught in schools; its selection and the rationale by which one course of study rather than another is included; its adaptation for different disciplines and for different categories of students; its cognitive and social purposes; the organization and integration of its various components. Education 3301 must be taken concurrently with this course. In order to qualify for this course, students must have Education 1101 and 2203; junior or senior standing; and a concentration in a core secondary school subject area (English: four courses in English; foreign language: four courses in the language; life science: four courses in biology; mathematics: four courses in mathematics; physical science: three courses in chemistry, earth and oceanographic science, or physics and one course in one of the other departments listed; or social studies: two courses in history and two courses in anthropology, economics, government, history, psychology, or sociology). Permission of the instructor.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

EDUC 3303  (c)   Student Teaching Practicum  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 18.  Credit/D/F Only.   

Required of all students who seek secondary public school certification, this final course in the student teaching sequence requires that students work full time in a local secondary school from early January to late April. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. Education 3304 must be taken concurrently. Students must complete an application and interview. Students with the following are eligible for this course: Education 2203, 3301 , and 3302; junior or senior standing; a cumulative 3.0 grade point average; a 3.0 grade point average in Education 3301 and 3302; and eight courses in a subject area that enables them to be certified by the State of Maine (English: eight courses in English; world language: eight courses in the language; life science: six courses in biology and two additional courses in biology, biochemistry, or neuroscience; mathematics: eight courses in mathematics; physical science: six courses in chemistry, earth and oceanographic science, or physics, and one course in each of the other departments listed; or social studies: six courses in history (at least two must be non-United States history) and one course each in two of the following departments: anthropology, economics, government, psychology, or sociology).

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

EDUC 3304  (c)   Bowdoin Teacher Scholar Seminar: Analysis of Teaching and Learning  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 18.  

Taken concurrently with Education 3303, Student Teaching Practicum. Considers theoretical and practical issues related to effective classroom instruction. Students with the following are eligible for this course: Education 2203, 3301, and 3302; junior or senior standing; a cumulative 3.0 grade point average; a 3.0 grade point average in Education 3301 and 3302; and eight courses in a subject area that enables them to be certified by the State of Maine (English: eight courses in English; world language: eight courses in the language; life science: six courses in biology and two additional courses in biology, biochemistry, or neuroscience; mathematics: eight courses in mathematics; physical science: six courses in chemistry, earth and oceanographic science, or physics, and one course in each of the other departments listed; or social studies: six courses in history (at least two must be non-United States history) and one course each in two of the following departments: anthropology, economics, government, psychology, or sociology).

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

EDUC 3333  (c)   Contemporary Research in Education Studies  

Lauren Saenz.
Every Year. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Draws together different theoretical, policy, and practice perspectives in education in the United States around a specific topic of inquiry determined by the instructor. Examines methodological perspectives in the field, e.g., quantitative, qualitative, and humanistic research. Students read original, contemporary research and develop skills to communicate with various educational stakeholders.

Prerequisites: Three of: either EDUC 2000 - 2250 or EDUC 2252 - 2969 and either EDUC 2000 - 2250 or EDUC 2252 - 2969 and EDUC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017.

EDUC 3535  (b)   Economics of Education  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 18.  

Seminar. Examines the theoretical and empirical analysis of education decision-making and the consequences of educational choices using an economic lens. Begins with the basic human capital model and expands on it to consider signaling, the interplay between ability and human capital, modeling expectations, and the many challenges of measuring the rate of return to educational investment. Educational policies from preschool to graduate studies are also considered, including the public funding of education, class size, and outcome testing. Examples are drawn from both developed and developing countries. (Same as: ECON 3535)

Prerequisites: Two of: ECON 2555 and ECON 2557 or MATH 2606.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2015.