Bowdoin College Catalogue and Academic Handbook

Government and Legal Studies (GOV)

GOV 1000  (b, FYS)   Citizenship and Representation in American Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines the issues of citizenship and representation in American politics. What does it mean to be a democratic citizen in the United States? Are we granted only rights, but no responsibilities? Or does citizenship demand that we take some active interest in our political life? Considers what it means for elected representatives to represent constituents. How do we know if our political system is accurately reflecting the interests of its citizens? When is an elected leader doing his or her job well? What evidence can we use to answer such questions?

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

GOV 1001  (b, FYS)   Representation, Participation, and Power in American Politics  

Janet Martin.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

An introductory seminar in American national politics. Readings, papers, and discussion explore the changing nature of power and participation in the American polity, with a focus on the interaction between individuals (non-voters, voters, party leaders, members of Congress, the president) and political institutions (parties, Congress, the executive branch, the judiciary). Not open to students who have credit for or are concurrently taking Government 1100.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016.

GOV 1002  (b, FYS)   Political Leadership  

Andrew Rudalevige.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

We talk about political leadership all the time, mostly to complain about its absence. Leadership is surely one of the key elements of politics, but what does it mean? Do we know it when we see it? What kinds of leaders do we have, and what kinds do we want? How do modern democratic conceptions of governance mesh with older visions of authority? Of ethics? Looks both at real world case studies and the treatment of leadership in literature. Offers a wide variety of perspectives on leadership and the opportunities and dangers it presents—both for those who want to lead, and for those who are called upon to follow.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2015.

GOV 1003  (b, FYS)   Political Science and the American Founding  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Introduces the study of politics and the discipline of political science through an exploration of the people, interests, and ideas that shaped the Founding from the American Revolution to the framing of the US Constitution. In particular, uses concepts employed by scholars who study social movements, legislative coalition-building, and international relations to examine the movement for independence, the negotiations that unfolded at the Constitutional Convention, the rhetorical positioning of Federalists and Anti-Federalists during the ratification debate, and the ongoing negotiation over the status of slavery in the new republic.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

GOV 1004  (b, FYS)   The Supreme Court and Social Change  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

The Supreme Court has played a role in adjudicating many of the nation’s most important social issues, addressing matters such as segregation in schools, gender discrimination, and same-sex marriage. Since Thurgood Marshall orchestrated the NAACP’s legal strategy to bring civil rights issues before the court rather than Congress, many other interest groups have followed suit. Investigates the trend of seeking legal change via courts, focusing on the Supreme Court’s role in social change by asking two connected questions: first, should the Supreme Court be deciding issues with such far-reaching impacts; second, since the court does wade into these matters, how effective are the justices in moving public opinion and influencing social change? Examines areas of policy in which the court has been particularly active including civil rights, access to abortion, and same-sex marriage, among others.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016.

GOV 1005  (b, FYS)   Women of Color in Politics  

Chryl Laird.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Explores the significant roles that women of color have played in American politics and around the world. Begins with the US context, starting in the antebellum era and moving forward by reading biographies/autobiographies that provide voice to the experiences faced by women of color in both traditional and non-traditional political spaces. These include women of color as close confidants to male political figures (first ladies, wives, and mistresses) and as politicians, judges, activists, and revolutionaries. Then shifts to a more global context considering the perspectives of women of color in countries where they have championed gender equality and feminism, and where they have become powerful political actors. (Same as: AFRS 1005)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017.

GOV 1010  (c, FYS)   Becoming Modern  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

An examination of early modernity from 1500 to 1800. Topics include modern doubt and skepticism; the quest for certainty; the rise of science; the emergence of individuality and its impact on ethics, politics, and religion; the Reformation; the Enlightenment; and the beginnings of Romanticism. Authors may include Montaigne, Shakespeare, Descartes, Bacon, Milton, Hobbes, Locke, Defoe, Rousseau, and Mary Shelley. Taught in association with another first-year seminar, English 1019. Both classes share a common syllabus and occasionally meet together for film viewings.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

GOV 1011  (b, FYS)   Fundamental Questions: Exercises in Political Theory  

Jean Yarbrough.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Explores the fundamental questions in political life: What is justice? What is happiness? Are human beings equal or unequal by nature? Do they even have a nature, or are they “socially constructed”? Are there ethical standards for political action that exist prior to law and, if so, where do they come from? Nature? God? History? Readings may include Plato, Aristotle, the Bible, Machiavelli, Locke, Rousseau, Shakespeare, the American Founders, Tocqueville, and Nietzsche.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

GOV 1012  (b, FYS)   Human Being and Citizen  

Michael Hawley.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

An introduction to the fundamental issues of political philosophy: human nature, the relationship between individual and political community, the nature of justice, the place of virtue, the idea of freedom, and the role of history. Readings span both ancient and modern philosophical literature. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, the American Founders, Tocqueville, Mill, and Nietzsche.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016.

GOV 1025  (b, FYS)   NGOs in Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) are thought to play a crucial role in politics -- monitoring the state, facilitating citizen participation in politics, and articulating policy alternatives. Yet the activities of NGOs vary significantly from one political system to another, most notably differing among developing and developed states and democratic and authoritarian states. In addition, NGOs’ role in the political process is being transformed by globalization and the increasingly transnational nature of political activism. Explores the following questions: How do factors such as a state’s level of economic development, its political culture, the nature of the political regime, and the arrangement of its political institutions shape NGOs’ role and influence in the political process? When and where have NGOs been successful in influencing political developments? How do the growing transnational linkages among NGOs affect their role in domestic politics?

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

GOV 1026  (b, FYS)   Global Media and Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines the impact of media including the Internet, newspapers, and television, on politics and society in cross-national perspective. Asks how differences in the ownership and regulation of media affect how news is selected and presented, and looks at various forms of government censorship and commercial self-censorship. Also considers the role of the media and “pop culture” in creating national identities, perpetuating ethnic stereotypes, and providing regime legitimation; and explores the impact of satellite television and the Internet on rural societies and authoritarian governments. (Same as: ASNS 1046)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

GOV 1027  (b, FYS)   The Politics of Climate Change  

Laura Henry.
Every Other Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Provides an overview of the major venues for climate politics and which actors are involved. Examines the politics of climate change at multiple levels—from the individual to global governance—and reviews climate policy in different countries. Pays particular attention to cases where active policy making or public mobilization around climate is occurring, asking why we see initiative and innovation in climate policy in these cities, states, and international venues and not elsewhere. Considers themes such as how climate policy is developed in democracies and authoritarian regimes, how climate policy may affect economic development, the role of non-state actors such as NGOs and business groups in climate politics, and the ethical implications of different climate policy options. (Same as: ENVS 1027)

GOV 1028  (b, FYS)   The Daughters of Mars: Women at War  

Christian Potholm.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Introduces the student to the nature of warfare throughout various cultures and epochs by focusing on the “Daughters of Mars,” women warriors and warrior queens. Includes case studies from the Trojan war, the early Eurasian steppes, classical Greece and Rome, the High Middle Ages, nineteenth-century Africa, Samurai Japan, the American Civil War, World War II, Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan. Also focuses on the arguments for and against having women in combat, culminating with the contemporary realities and debates concerning American women in combat today. Student research projects investigate these and other related subjects.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

GOV 1029  (b, FYS)   Buried Treasure, Hidden Curse? Politics of Natural Resource Extraction in Africa  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Oil, diamonds, gold. . . riches in the midst of poverty. How can Africa boast so many natural resources and yet remain the poorest continent on earth? What is the “resource curse?” Begins by putting Africa in the context of global resource extraction, oil in particular. Establishes Africa’s long pre-colonial experience with trade in iron, gold, salt, and slaves. The colonial period deepened the reliance of many territories on specific resources, a pattern that continues to the present. Uses Burkina Faso as a specific example of gold extraction, contrasting industrial and artisanal mining. Modern streams of prospectors throughout West Africa echo the California gold rush, but with important distinctions. An introduction to political science, the interplay between national and foreign governments, international and domestic firms, and local and migrant prospectors as they vie for access to valuable resources are highlighted. (Same as: AFRS 1029)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017.

GOV 1030  (b, FYS)   The Pursuit of Peace  

Allen Springer.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Examines different strategies for preventing and controlling armed conflict in international society, and emphasizes the role of diplomacy, international law, and international organizations in the peace-making process.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

GOV 1031  (b, FYS)   Weapons of the Weak  

Barbara Elias.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Despite enjoying a preponderance of resources, the rich and mighty don’t always win in life, or in war. Why? How do peasants and insurgents impose their will on more powerful organizations? How do wealthy armies at times lose wars to impoverished rebels? Whereas money and material can be measured, divided and counted in a spreadsheet, less quantifiable factors of conflict such as ideas, identity, legitimacy, will power and fortitude are too often discounted as secondary factors. But these may, in truth, be at the heart of war, and weapons for the weak to bring down the mighty.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2015.

GOV 1100  (b)   Introduction to American Government  

Michael Franz.
Every Year. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 50.
  

Provides a comprehensive overview of the American political process. Specifically, traces the foundations of American government (the Constitution, federalism, civil rights, and civil liberties), its political institutions (Congress, presidency, courts, and bureaucracy), and its electoral processes (elections, voting, and political parties). Also examines other influences, such as public opinion and the mass media, which fall outside the traditional institutional boundaries, but have an increasingly large effect on political outcomes. Not open to students who have credit for or are concurrently taking Government 1001.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

GOV 1400  (b)   Introduction to Comparative Government  

Every Year. Enrollment limit: 50.  

Provides a broad introduction to key concepts in comparative politics. Most generally, asks why states are governed differently, both historically and in contemporary politics. Surveys subfields within comparative politics (the state, regime types, nations and nationalism, party systems, development, and civil society) to familiarize students with major debates and questions.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016.

GOV 1600  (b)   Introduction to International Relations  

Barbara Elias.
Every Year. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 50.
  

Provides a broad introduction to the study of international relations (IR). Designed to strike a balance between empirical and historical knowledge and the obligatory theoretical understanding and schools of thought in IR. Designed as an introductory course to familiarize students with no prior background in the subject, and recommended for first- and second-year students intending to take upper-level international relations courses.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

GOV 2001  (b)   Watergate and American Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

The “third-rate burglary” at the Watergate complex in 1972 ultimately revealed broad abuses of presidential power, led to the resignation of the president, and lent a suffix to a wide range of future scandals. Examines both Watergate itself and what it wrought in American politics. Topics include the relationship between the executive and legislative branches in areas ranging from budgetary policy to the war power; the role of the press; governmental ethics, investigations, and impeachment; and Watergate's place in popular and political culture.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2016.

GOV 2002  (b)   Judicial Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Introduces students to the study of judicial politics and judicial decision-making. Approaches large topics including how the nomination and confirmation process impact the federal courts; if elected politicians and unelected actors alter the court’s decision-making; factors the court considers when choosing which cases to hear; and actions the Supreme Court takes to ensure the public and lower courts comply with its rulings. Students explore different stages of the legal system (i.e. agenda-setting, decision-making, etc.) and assess their relative importance. Imparts the ability to define and apply social scientific theories to judicial decision-making and to the legal process as a whole.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017.

GOV 2005  (b)   The American Presidency  

Andrew Rudalevige.
Every Year. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

An examination of the presidency in the American political system, including the “road to the White House” (party nomination process and role of the electoral college), advisory systems, the institutional presidency, relations with Congress and the courts, and decision-making in the White House. In addition, the instructors draw from their own research interests. For Professor Martin these include presidential-congressional relations, the unilateral action of the President, the role of women as advisors within the White House and in the executive branch, and the influence of outside groups on the White House’s consideration of issues. As part of their final class project, students will be expected to attend a film event--see comments for further information. For Professor Rudalevige these include presidents’ inter-branch relations, with a recent emphasis on presidential efforts to manage the wider executive branch through administrative and unilateral tactics.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Fall 2015.

GOV 2010  (b)   United States Congress  

Janet Martin.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 20.
  

An examination of the United States Congress, with a focus on members, leaders, constituent relations, the congressional role in the policy-making process, congressional procedures and their impact on policy outcomes, the budget process, and executive-congressional relations.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016.

GOV 2015  (b)   Public Administration  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

We deal with public organizations every day -- nearly 15 percent of the United States workforce operates within one -- addressing concerns ranging from playground safety to the prevention of international terrorism. Explores how and why this vital part of government works the way it does in the American political context. What do public organizations do? How well do they do it? How are they (and how might they be) managed? How do they distribute resources, and under what constraints? How are they similar to or different from their private sector counterparts? Is red tape always a bad thing? Considering these questions, examines a variety of real-world cases; these might include the Cuban Missile Crisis, the response to Hurricane Katrina, or the implementation of No Child Left Behind. Underlying discussion will be the perpetual difficulty in reconciling organizational efficiency with democratic accountability.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

GOV 2020  (b)   Constitutional Law I  

George Isaacson.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Examines the development of American constitutionalism, the power of judicial review, federalism, and separation of powers.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

GOV 2021  (b)   Constitutional Law II: Civil Rights and Liberties  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines questions arising under the First and Fourteenth Amendments.

Prerequisites: GOV 2020.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

GOV 2024  (b)   Education and Law  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 19.  

A study of the impact of the American legal system on the functioning of schools in the United States through an examination of Supreme Court decisions and federal legislation. Analyzes the public policy considerations that underlie court decisions in the field of education and considers how those judicial interests may differ from the concerns of school boards, administrators, and teachers. Issues to be discussed include constitutional and statutory developments affecting schools in such areas as free speech, sex discrimination, religious objections to compulsory education, race relations, teachers’ rights, school financing, and the education of those with disabilities. (Same as: EDUC 2250)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

GOV 2030  (b)   Political Science and Policy History in the United States  

Jeffrey Selinger.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

How have the institutions of government crafted by the American founders shaped the basic contours of the policy process? How has the policy process changed as the structure of the American political system itself has changed over time? Addresses these questions, introducing students to concepts and tools that political scientists use as they try to untangle complex patterns of policy development. Assigned readings trace the historical lineage of policies affecting health care, retirement, immigration, and other critical areas of public concern. Through analysis of these substantive policy matters, examines how and to what extent policy choices made in the past have shaped the horizon of options available to policymakers today.

GOV 2035  (b)   Maine Politics  

Christian Potholm.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

An analysis of politics in the state of Maine since World War II. Subjects covered include the dynamics of Republican and Democratic rivalries and the efficacy of the Independent voter, the rise of the Green and Reform parties, the growing importance of ballot measure initiatives, and the interaction of ethnicity and politics in the Pine Tree State. An analysis of key precincts and Maine voting paradigms is included, as well as a look at the efficacy of such phenomena as the north/south geographic split, the environmental movement, and the impact of such interest groups as SAM, the Tea Party, and the Roman Catholic Church. Students are expected to follow contemporary political events on a regular basis.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

GOV 2039  (b)   Urban Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines politics in American cities. Whereas public attention tends to focus on national and international levels of politics, highlights the importance of local and urban institutions and behavior. Considers competition between cities and suburbs, the internal environment of suburban politics, state-city and federal-city relations, racial conflict and urban governance, and the impact of private power on local decision-making. Focuses on the various individuals and institutions that shape the foundation of urban government including politicians, municipal bureaucracies, parties, political machines, interest

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

GOV 2050  (b)   Public Opinion and Voting Behavior  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the political behavior of ordinary citizens. Begins with a broad focus on the importance of citizen participation in a democracy, and the debate over how much or how little participation is best. Examines the reasons for citizen (non)participation, and focuses on the effects of campaigns and social capital on different forms of participation.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

GOV 2052  (b, ESD)   Race, Ethnicity, and Politics  

Chryl Laird.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Examines the impact of race and ethnicity on American politics. Key topics include the development of group identity and the mobilization of political activism. Also covers voting rights and representation, as well as impacts on education and criminal justice. Groups addressed include Native Americans, black Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and white Americans. (Same as: AFRS 2052)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017.

GOV 2053  (b, ESD)   Black Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Traces and examines the political efforts of black Americans to gain full and equitable inclusion into the American polity. Key topics include identity, ideology, movement politics, electoral participation, institutions and public policy. (Same as: AFRS 2053)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

GOV 2055  (b)   Political Parties in the United States  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Throughout American political history, parties have been among the most adept institutions at organizing political conflict and, more generally, American political life. In this vein, the role of political parties in the evolution of American politics is discussed. Special attention is given to the present political context, which many characterize as an era of ideologically polarized parties. Explores and challenges this conventional wisdom.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2016.

GOV 2060  (b)   Campaigns and Elections  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Addresses current theories and controversies concerning political campaigns and elections in the United States. Takes advantage of the fact that the class meets during the heart of the next presidential and congressional campaigns. Uses concepts from the political science literature on elections to explore general trends in electoral choice at the legislative and presidential level. Students will be expected to follow journalistic accounts of the fall campaigns closely. A second set of readings introduces political science literature on campaigns and elections. These readings touch upon a wide range of themes, including voting behavior (e.g., economic voting and issue voting), campaign finance, media strategy, the role of incumbency, presidential primaries, the Electoral College, and trends in partisan realignment.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

GOV 2080  (b, MCSR)    Quantitative Analysis in Political Science  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the use of quantitative methods to study political phenomena. Discusses the nature of empirical thinking and how principles used for years by natural scientists, such as causation and control, have been adopted by social scientists. Introduces what these methods are (such as Chi-square tests, difference of means, and linear regression) and how they might be useful in political research and applies these methods, with particular emphasis on the use of survey data. Using quantitative methods, employs statistical computing software (such as Stata, SPSS, and/or R) as a research tool, with a focus on effective presentation of data and results. The assignments include a mix of essay writing and problem sets. The course is designed for students with little or no experience in statistical inference.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

GOV 2090  (b)   Political Economy of the United States from Revolution to Reconstruction  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 50.  

An interdisciplinary study of the first hundred years of the United States. Explores a range of topics through the lenses of economics, politics, and history: the formation of the American system of governance, the implications of a growing market economy and the territory it encompassed, the politics and economics of slavery, notions of civic inclusion and exclusion, and the shifting intellectual bases of American economic and political life. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: HIST 2143, ECON 2143)

Prerequisites: ECON 1050 or ECON 1101 or Placement in ECON 1102 or Placement in earned ECON 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

GOV 2200  (b)   Classical Political Philosophy  

Jean Yarbrough.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

A survey of classical political philosophy focusing on selected dialogues of Plato, the political writings of Aristotle, and St. Augustine's City of God. Examines ancient Greek and early Christian reflections on human nature, justice, the best regime, the relationship of the individual to the political community, the relationship of philosophy to politics, and the tension between reason and revelation.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

GOV 2210  (b)   Modern Political Philosophy  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

A survey of modern political philosophy from Machiavelli to Mill. Examines the overthrow of the classical horizon, the movement of human will and freedom to the center of political thought, the idea of the social contract, the origin and meaning of rights, the relationship between freedom and equality, the role of democracy, and the replacement of nature by history as the source of human meaning. Authors may include Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Hume, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, and Mill.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

GOV 2220  (b)   Liberalism and Its Critics  

Michael Hawley.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

An examination of liberal democratic doctrine and of religious, cultural, and radical criticisms of it in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Authors may include Locke, Kant, Burke, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

GOV 2230  (b)   American Political Thought  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the political thought of American statesmen and writers from the founding to the twentieth century, with special emphasis on three pivotal moments: the Founding, the Crisis of the House Divided, and the growth of the modern welfare state. Readings include the Federalist Papers, the Anti-federalists, Jefferson and Hamilton, Calhoun, Lincoln, William Graham Sumner, the Progressives, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and contemporary thinkers on both the right and the left.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

GOV 2245  (c)   Shakespeare and Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 40.  

Considers Shakespeare as a political thinker whose plays both absorb classical political philosophy and respond to pressing political matters of his day (and beyond). This team-taught course encourages open-ended debate and argumentation in order to foster informed and critical conversation between Shakespeare and Plato, Machiavelli, More, and Montaigne, among others. Beginning with philosophical questions about human nature, citizenship, and the rights of kings that appear in Shakespeare’s histories and tragedies, we turn in the second half of the course toward the politics of religion, ethnicity, and gender in the comedies and romances. Note: This class fulfills the pre-1800 literature requirement for English majors. (Same as: ENGL 2203)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

GOV 2250  (b)   Politics and Culture  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

In light of current debates about “culture wars,” “multiculturalism,” and the “clash of civilizations, examines the relationship between culture and politics, primarily by looking at philosophical reflection on the subject over the last two centuries. Investigates many questions, including: What is culture? Why does it matter to politics? How has it been affected by democracy, capitalism, and technology? Is there a crisis of modern culture? If so, is there any way that it can be rectified? Authors may include: Schiller, Tocqueville, Carlyle, Ruskin, Mill, Arnold, Whitman, Nietzsche, Eliot, Horkheimer, Adorno, Raymond Williams, Allan Bloom, Clifford Geertz, and Charles Taylor.

Prerequisites: GOV 1007 - 1019 or GOV 1040 - 1045 or GOV 2100 - 2399 or GOV 2800 - 2899 or GOV 2975 - 2979 or GOV 3100 - 3399 or GOV 3800 - 3899 or GOV 4005 - 4009.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2016.

GOV 2260  (b)   Contemporary Political Philosophy  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

A survey of political philosophy in Europe and the United States since 1945. Examines a broad array of topics, including the revival of political philosophy, relativism, rationalism, contemporary liberal theory, communitarianism, conservatism, multiculturalism, feminism, and postmodernism. Authors may include Strauss, Arendt, Oakeshott, Berlin, Hayek, Rawls, Sandel, Taylor, Walzer, Okin, Habermas, and Foucault.

Prerequisites: GOV 1007 - 1019 or GOV 1040 - 1045 or GOV 2100 - 2399 or GOV 2800 - 2899 or GOV 2975 - 2979 or GOV 3100 - 3399 or GOV 3800 - 3899 or GOV 4005 - 4009.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

GOV 2270  (b)   Religion and Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the relationship between religion and politics -- the so-called theological-political question -- primarily in modern Europe and America. Focuses first on the tension between and eventual separation of church and state in the early modern period; then considers the implications and complications of this historic separation, looking at recent Supreme Court cases, as well as contemporary discussion of the relationship between religion and politics. Comparisons with the treatment of this issue in the Islamic world are made. Authors include Machiavelli, Luther, Calvin, Spinoza, Locke, Jefferson, Madison, Tocqueville, as well as a variety of contemporary and Islamic writers.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

GOV 2275  (b)   The Crescent and the Cross: Islamic and Christian Political Philosophy in the Medieval World  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

An exercise in comparative political theory, this course considers the medieval political philosophy of the Christian and Islamic worlds. It explores how Muslim and Christian thinkers responded differently to the tension between philosophy and religious authority. It examines how these two traditions of thought adopted and adapted classical philosophy in a new monotheistic context. Authors may include Augustine, Al-Farabi, Aquinas, Averroes, Dante, and Ibn Khaldun.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

GOV 2280  (b)   Eros and Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

What and who do we love? Do we seek another self or someone to complement our natures? Is there something other than human beings that we love? The Good, God, or some other principle? How do the answers to these questions affect our views of politics and justice? Readings include Plato’s “Symposium”; the Bible; Shakespeare; Rousseau’s “Emile”; Tocqueville; and contemporary thinkers.

Prerequisites: GOV 1007 - 1019 or GOV 1040 - 1045 or GOV 2100 - 2399 or GOV 2800 - 2899 or GOV 2975 - 2979 or GOV 3100 - 3399 or GOV 4005 - 4009.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

GOV 2400  (b, IP)   West European Politics  

Laura Henry.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Analyzes the dynamics of West European political systems, including the varieties of parliamentary and electoral systems and the formation of governments and lawmaking. Addresses contemporary political challenges in Britain, France, Germany, Italy, and other states, considering topics such as institutional reform, welfare state policies, economic growth and unemployment, immigration, relations with the United States, and other foreign policy concerns. The European Union is not examined, as it is a separate course, Government 2500: The Politics of the European Union.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

GOV 2405  (b, IP)   British Politics and Society  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Comprehensive overview of modern British politics in historical, social and cultural context.Considers the historical formation of the United Kingdom and the development of the modern democratic state, but focuses on political developments after 1945. Analyzes party politics, the Welfare State, Thatcherism, and the contemporary political scene. Explores policy issues including healthcare, education, economic policy, and the role of the media.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018.

GOV 2410  (b, IP)   Post-Communist Russian Politics and Society  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Explores the most dramatic political event of the twentieth century: the collapse of Soviet communism and Russia’s subsequent political development. Begins by examining the Soviet system and the political and social upheaval of the late Soviet period. Proceeds to investigate the challenges of contemporary Russian politics, including the semi-authoritarian regime, the challenges of sustainable economic growth and modernization, the demographic crisis, the loss of superpower status, and the search for a role in international politics. Comparisons made with other countries in the post-Communist region.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2017.

GOV 2440  (b, IP)   Contemporary Chinese Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the history and politics of China in the context of a prolonged revolution. Begins by examining the end of imperial rule, the development of Modern China, socialist transformations and the establishment of the PRC. After a survey of the political system as established in the 1950s and patterns of politics emerging from it, the analytic focus turns to political change in the reform era (since 1979) and the forces driving it. The adaptation by the Communist Party to these changes and the prospects of democratization are also examined. Topics include political participation and civil society, urban and rural China, gender in China, and the effects of post-Mao economic reform. (Same as: ASNS 2060)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2016.

GOV 2444  (b, IP)   Political and Economic Development in East Asia  

Aki Nakai.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Provides an introduction to diversity and development in East Asia. The course first focuses on the rise and decline of a China- and a Japan-centric order before WWII and discusses their historical impacts on today’s domestic politics and international relations. The course then traces the postwar political economic developments. It examines the economic miracles in Asian countries and discusses their democratization. It also presents the process of Chinese economic reform and its impacts on the regional order. The course finishes with an examination of the Asian financial crisis and its impacts on regional politics. (Same as: ASNS 2920)

GOV 2445  (b, IP)   Asian Communism: The Politics of China, Vietnam, North Korea, and Mongolia  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the Asian communism in China, Vietnam, North Korea, and Mongolia. Asian communism presents a series of fascinating questions. Why did communist revolutions occur in some Asian states but not others? Why were relations between some Asian communist states peaceful while others were hostile? Why did some adopt significant economic reforms while others maintained command economies? Why did communist regimes persist in most Asian states, while Communism fell in Mongolia and all of Europe? The approach of the course is explicitly comparative and structured around thematic comparisons between the four states. (Same as: ASNS 2860)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

GOV 2446  (b, IP)   Global Media and Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the interconnections between media, politics and society in cross-national perspective. Explores national differences in issues such as free speech policy; privacy rights; censorship and self-censorship; news production and consumption; and the role of public broadcasters such as the BBC and NHK. Also considers the role of pop culture in shaping national identities and creating diplomatic "soft power." Cases drawn primarily but not exclusively from the UK, Japan and the USA. (Same as: ASNS 2321)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

GOV 2450  (b, ESD, IP)   Japanese Politics and Society  

Henry Laurence.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Comprehensive overview of modern Japanese politics in historical, social, and cultural context. Analyzes the electoral dominance of the Liberal Democratic Party, the nature of democratic politics, and the rise and fall of the economy. Other topics include the status of women and ethnic minorities, education, war guilt, nationalism, and the role of the media. (Same as: ASNS 2320)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

GOV 2480  (b, IP)   Comparative Constitutional Law  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 19.  

A comparative examination of constitutional principles and constitutional processes in democratic and non-democratic countries. Explores the roles that constitutions play in shaping civil society and defining the relationship between governments and the people they govern. Compares American constitutional law with that of other nations to scrutinize alternative models of governance, and to gain new perspectives regarding the legal foundations for the protection of individual rights. Special attention given to the constitutions of Canada, India, Germany, South Africa, Israel, and the People’s Republic of China, along with that of the United States. Structural issues include consideration of executive-legislative separation of powers, constitutional courts, federalism, and church-state relations. Discusses arguments in favor of and against a written Bill of Rights, as well as such specific issues as emergency powers, political dissent, hate speech, religious belief, reproductive choice, racial and gender discrimination, public welfare, privacy, and police investigative authority.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2017, Fall 2015.

GOV 2482  (b, IP)   Food, Environment, and Development  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Explores the nexus of food, environment, and development in global environmental politics. Examines the interconnected challenges of governing across trans-boundary socio-ecological systems amidst competing demands on scarce natural resources—to sustain a global food system, foster economic development, and promote equity and justice. Prepares students to engage with interdisciplinary scholarship from political science, international development, public policy, and food studies. Draws on comparative cases from local to global scales, with an emphasis on Maine, the U.S., and Latin America. (Same as: ENVS 2313, LAS 2513)

Prerequisites: ENVS 1101 or ENVS 2330 (same as GOV 2910).

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

GOV 2484  (b, IP)   Comparative Environmental Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines environmental politics from a comparative perspective, drawing on case material from the United States, Europe, Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Asks why, despite the fact that many contemporary environmental problems are shared globally, states develop different environmental policies. Readings cover issues ranging from forest conservation to climate policy and consider explanatory factors such as type of political regime, level of economic development, activism by citizens, and culture and values. (Same as: ENVS 2306)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

GOV 2486  (b, IP)   The Politics of Dictatorship: Authoritarian Resilience and Democratization  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Despite the end of the Cold War, dictatorship has persisted, even thrived. At least 40 percent of states in the world remain authoritarian. Introduces students to the social and political logic of dictatorship. Explores questions such as: Where do dictatorships come from? Why might people support dictatorships? What effect does dictatorship have on political, economic, and social outcomes? How do dictatorships differ from one another? Why are some dictatorships resilient and stand the test of time while some quickly collapse? When dictatorships collapse, why are some dictatorships replaced by other dictatorships, while others democratize? Concentrates on the post-World War II era and explores the dynamics of dictatorship in regions throughout the world, including the Middle East, Latin America, Asia, Europe, and Africa.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016.

GOV 2488  (b, IP)   Comparative Political Economy  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Introduces core concepts, theories, and debates within comparative political economy. Considers the origins and emergence of market economies, their spread, and contemporary political challenges. Explores key figures in political economic thought including Smith, Marx, Polanyi, and Hayek, among others. Examines major research and thought traditions in political economy including liberalism, Keynesianism, neoliberalism, and critical political economy. Investigates substantive topics including regulation, economic crises, property rights, development, the welfare state, and resource governance. Cases from the United Kingdom, United States, Scandinavia, Central Asia, Latin America, and sub-Saharan Africa. Presumes no prior knowledge of economics.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

GOV 2500  (b, IP)   The Politics of the European Union  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Explores the historical foundations, scope, and consequences of European political and economic integration since 1951. Examines how the European Union’s supranational political institutions, law, and policies have developed and how they affect the domestic politics of member states. Considers challenges faced by the European Union: enlargement to include Eastern European members, the loss of national sovereignty and the “democratic deficit,” the creation of a European identity, and the development of a coordinated foreign policy.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2016.

GOV 2515  (b, IP)   The Politics of East Central Europe  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Surveys political developments in East Central Europe from the interwar period to the present. How did these states become part of the Soviet bloc? Why did they experience democratization in the late 1980s? How can we explain divergent political and economic outcomes in the post-Communist period? How has participation in the European Union affected new member states and their relations with non-members to the East and South? Students are encouraged to investigate these questions by engaging in comparative research.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

GOV 2530  (b, IP)   Politics and Societies in Africa  

Ericka Albaugh.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Surveys societies and politics in sub-Saharan Africa, seeking to understand the sources of current conditions and the prospects for political stability and economic growth. Looks briefly at pre-colonial society and colonial influence on state-construction in Africa, and concentrates on three broad phases in Africa’s contemporary political development: (1) independence and consolidation of authoritarian rule; (2) economic decline and challenges to authoritarianism; (3) democratization and civil conflict. Presumes no prior knowledge of the region. (Same as: AFRS 2530)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2015.

GOV 2540  (b, IP)   U.S. - China Relations  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the development of United States relations with China. Begins with a brief historical examination of the Opium War, then examines United States policy towards the Nationalists and the Communists during the Chinese Civil War. In the aftermath of the civil war and subsequent revolution, the role of China in the Cold War will be discussed. Then focuses on more contemporary issues in United States-China relations, drawing links between the domestic politics of both countries and how they influence the formulation of foreign policy. Contemporary issues addressed include human rights, trade, the Taiwanese independence movement, nationalism, and China’s growing economic influence in the world. (Same as: ASNS 2061)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

GOV 2550  (b, IP)   The Two Koreas and Geopolitics of Northeast Asia  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the tumultuous developments on the Korean peninsula over the past century and their significance from historical, security, economic, and geopolitical perspectives. The challenges and choices facing the Korean people, their governments, neighboring countries, and the United States are assessed to understand how conditions have evolved to the high-stakes tensions that exist today, and what forces are shaping the future of both Koreas and Northeast Asia. The first half of the course considers the history of both Koreas and the conditions that underlie the modern political environment. The second half focuses on political developments of the last twenty-five years. (Same as: ASNS 2872)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018.

GOV 2570  (b, IP)   The Politics of Development: Poverty, Prosperity, and Political Change  

Ericka Albaugh.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Examines the meaning of development from economic and political perspectives. Considers various theories and practices of development that have been applied to newly independent states in Asia, Latin America, and Africa. Investigates why trajectories of economic growth and political stability have been so uneven in different regions of the world. Incorporates views from both external and internal actors on issues such as foreign aid, multilateral institutions, good governance, and democratic participation.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

GOV 2572  (b, ESD, IP)   The Politics of Ethnicity: Construction and Mobilization of Ethnic Identity Claims  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Ethnicity is a crucial dividing line in most societies. Examines what ethnicity is, when it is mobilized peacefully and when it ignites violence, and what political tools exist to moderate these conflicts. Explores first the various definitions of ethnicity and theories of ethnic identity formation; then studies the different explanations for why ethnic divisions inspire conflict within societies and evaluates possible means of mitigating violence. Draws on case studies from around the world, particularly those in Africa and Asia.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2016.

GOV 2573  (b, IP)   States of Languages and Languages of States  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the role of language in politics. Governments historically have tried to spread a single language within their populations through education and military conscription. What are the roots of this motivation? Does language standardization deepen the possibility for citizen participation and democracy? How have minority language groups responded? As the right to language has become a global norm, what effects will this have on the cohesiveness of existing states? Will globalization bring with it linguistic fragmentation or the worldwide spread of a few languages such as English, Arabic, and Chinese? Looks at the language question in the United States as well as in cases drawn from Europe, Asia, and Africa. Students choose a country in which to evaluate the historical and present state of languages and language(s) of state. Topics touched by language include democracy, state-building, colonization, violence, education, human rights, and globalization.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

GOV 2574  (b, IP)   Rioters, Rebels, and Revolutionaries: Contentious Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the rough and tumble world of contentious politics, which includes forms of social mobilization as diverse as riots, revolutions, and rebellions. While much of “routine politics” takes place through elections, examines activities that cross over into the extraordinary and asks questions such as: What is the relationship between elections and riots? Why do some revolutionary movements succeed while others fail? Given great personal risks, why do some people protest in dictatorships? How do states respond to protests and why? Examines the commonalities and differences between these diverse events through case studies throughout the developing world, including Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

GOV 2577  (b, IP)   Arctic Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

The Arctic looms in our political imagination as the region most directly affected by a changing global climate that threatens the displacement of northern communities and cultures. It is also a site of fierce competition for state control and economic development. This course investigates the Arctic as a political space that encapsulates elements of comparative politics and international relations. It examines cross-national variation in policies toward Arctic regions in states such as the United States, Canada, Russia, Iceland, and Norway. It also explores dynamic international engagement around the Arctic by state officials, corporations, indigenous communities, and activists. The course will address governance issues such as indigenous rights, economic development and natural resource exploitation, environmental issues and climate change, the potential militarization of the region, international law, and the role of the Arctic Council. (Same as: ENVS 2377)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

GOV 2580  (b, IP)   Advanced Comparative Politics: Government, War, and Society  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

An examination of the forces and processes by which governments and societies approach and wage or avoid wars. The theories and practices of warfare of various political systems are analyzed and particular attention is paid to the interface where politics, society, and the military come together under governmental auspices in various comparative contexts. Specific examples from Africa, Asia, Europe, and North America are examined.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

GOV 2600  (b, IP)   International Law  

Allen Springer.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

The modern state system, the role of law in its operation, the principles and practices that have developed, and the problems involved in their application.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

GOV 2615  (b, IP)   International Environmental Policy  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the political, legal, and institutional dimension of international efforts to protect the environment. Problems discussed include transboundary and marine pollution, maintaining biodiversity, and global climate change. (Same as: ENVS 2308)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015.

GOV 2621  (b, IP)   The Politics of Nuclear Proliferation and Nonproliferation  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Nuclear weapons have had a constant impact on international relations since their advent in 1945. The initial US monopoly on nuclear weapons gave way to bilateral competition with the Soviet Union, followed by the post-Cold War period in which proliferation concerns have grown to include so-called rogue states and non-state actors. Exposes students to the history and theory of nuclear weapons proliferation and encourages engagement in current debates on the topic. Addresses the following topics: technology necessary for developing a nuclear weapons program, why states proliferate, and policies available to address nuclear proliferation.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017.

GOV 2670  (b)   United States Foreign Policy  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the development and conduct of United States foreign policy. Analyzes the impact of intragovernmental rivalries, the media, public opinion, and interest groups on the policy-making process, and provides case studies of contemporary foreign policy issues.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016.

GOV 2680  (b, IP)   International Security  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

National security is a principal interest for states, but what exactly does that mean in international political life, and for the security of ordinary people like us? What strategic options are available to decision makers tasked with protecting national security? How much do national security polices reflect coherent planning, and how much are policies the product of competing international, economic, and technological constraints, or domestic political interests? Analyzing the strategy and politics of diplomacy, alliances, threats, aid, and war, aims to provide an overview of security studies within the field of international relations.

Prerequisites: GOV 1600.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2017, Fall 2016.

GOV 2690  (b, IP)   Islam and Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Analyzing the intersection of politics and multiple expressions of Islam in both state governments and transnational movements, studies Islam as a social, ethical, and political force in the modern era. Offers a basic introduction to Muslim history and the Islamic religion, explores various Islamic social and political movements, analyzes contending understandings of the interaction between politics and Islam, as well as investigating the tensions between the Islamic and western political traditions, including democracy and Islam. Relying on texts from influential revolutionaries such as Qutb and Khomeini as well as perspectives on political Islam from academic scholars, explores the heart of politics, society, and religion in the modern Muslim world.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2016.

GOV 2694  (b, IP)   International Relations in East Asia  

Aki Nakai.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Analyzes relations between the various states in East Asia and between those states and countries outside the region, including the United States. The course addresses empirical and theoretical questions, including: What are the threats to peace and prosperity in the region, and how are the different countries responding? What explains the foreign policy strategies of different countries, including China and Japan, and how have they changed over time? How can broader theories of international relations inform, and be informed by, the nature of foreign policy choices in this region? Is East Asia headed toward greater cooperation or conflict? (Same as: ASNS 2921)

GOV 2902  (b, ESD)    Talking to Farmers and Fishermen: Social Science Field Methods for Environmental Policy Research  

Shana Starobin.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 12.
  

Natural resource users—like farmers and fishermen—possess intimate knowledge of the complex socioecological systems where they live and work. How can researchers appropriately and ethically engage individual and community stakeholders as participants in environmental research? Through assignments, activities, and class excursions (lab), students will gain competence in collaborative field research skills, including the ethical conduct of research with human subjects, participant observation, conducting interviews and focus groups, writing up field notes, developing metadata, and establishing protocols for data management. Students will also practice preliminary data analysis—transcription and text analysis of field collected data, descriptive statistics, and identification of future research questions. (Same as: ENVS 2314)

Prerequisites: ENVS 2330 (same as GOV 2910) or ENVS 2313 (same as GOV 2482 and LAS 2513).

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

GOV 2910  (b, IP)   Environmental Policy and Politics  

Shana Starobin.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Explores the political, economic, legal, ethical, and institutional dimensions of the environmental policy-making process. Examines the formation and implementation of regulatory institutions and policies across a range of issues in the U.S. and internationally--including terrestrial, coastal and marine natural resources management, biodiversity, water and air pollution, sustainable development, and environmental justice. Prepares students to analyze historical cases as well as contrive and evaluate competing policy alternatives to emerging problems. (Same as: ENVS 2330)

Prerequisites: ENVS 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017.

GOV 2915  (b)   Environmental Law and Policy  

Conrad Schneider.
Every Other Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Critical examination of some of the most important American environmental laws and their application to environmental problems that affect the United States and the world. Students learn what the law currently requires and how it is administered by federal and state agencies, and are encouraged to examine the effectiveness of current law and consider alternative approaches. (Same as: ENVS 2304)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

GOV 3010  (b)   Advanced Seminar in American Politics: Presidential-Congressional Relations  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 15.  

Examines presidential-congressional relations through a number of perspectives, including use of historical, quantitative, and institutional analyses. Readings consider the relationship between the executive branch and Congress in both the domestic arena (including regulatory and budgetary policy) and in the area of foreign and defense policy.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017.

GOV 3020  (b)   Money and Politics  

Michael Franz.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 15.
  

Considers the historical and contemporary relationship between money and government. In what ways have moneyed interests always had distinctive influences on American politics? Does this threaten the vibrancy of our representative democracy? Are recent controversies over campaign finance reform and lobbying reform signs that American government is in trouble? Reading, writing, and discussion intensive, considers the large academic literature on this subject, as well as the reflections of journalists and political practitioners, with the overall goal of understanding the money/politics relationship in ways that facilitate the evaluation of American democracy.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

GOV 3022  (b)   United States Supreme Court Simulation  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 15.  

The decisions issued by the United States Supreme Court have enormous implications for the litigants in the case, lower courts, government, and society as a whole. Thus, it is important to analyze and understand the process by which the court makes its decisions and policies. Investigates the processes by which cases get to the Supreme Court, are accepted or denied, and are decided. The means for investigating this process entails a semester-long simulation. Students assume the roles of the justices, the solicitor general, litigants, and other actors in the judicial system. In order to inform the simulation, students also complete focused studies of court procedures, judicial process, and judicial decision-making.

Prerequisites: GOV 2002 or GOV 2020 or GOV 2021 or GOV 2600 or GOV 2940 (same as EDUC 2250).

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

GOV 3025  (b)   The Politics of Policy Implementation  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

What happens after a bill becomes a law? During implementation, the separated system of American governance comes into sharp relief across the branches of government and across three (or more) levels of government as well. Examines how the wide range of institutional players involved -- from legislators to regulators to chief executives to judges to front-line service providers -- act and interact. Case studies (e.g., entitlement reform, education policy, intelligence reorganization, health care) used to evaluate competing theoretical frameworks.

Prerequisites: GOV 1100 or GOV 2000 - 2099.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

GOV 3030  (b)   American Political Development  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines how the United States developed from a modest, agrarian republic into a modern, mass democracy. How have the forces often associated with the process of modernization (e.g., the expansion of commerce and new media, the growth of industry, the rise of a welfare and regulatory state) changed the shape of America’s representative institutions and the nature of American political culture? Readings focus on the development of the electoral system, the emergence of a modern bureaucratic establishment, and the rise of the presidency as the focal point of party politics. Discussion examines how these and other developments have shaped America’s liberal democratic values and transformed its political institutions.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015.

GOV 3035  (b)   Presidential Power and the Law  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 15.  

Grapples with current and historical questions of presidential power. Article II of the US Constitution is brief, and vague; the executive power is nowhere defined. How do presidents gain traction against the legislative and judicial (and even the executive) branches? Case studies include a variety of claims made by presidents about their unilateral administrative tools and in the contemporary "war on terror" (with regard to detention, interrogation, surveillance, due process, etc.), as well as the reaction they have provoked from other branches of government, such as Congress and the Supreme Court.

Prerequisites: GOV 1100 or GOV 2000 - 2099.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2016.

GOV 3200  (b)   Advanced Seminar in Political Theory: Tocqueville  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 15.  

More than 150 years after its publication, “Democracy in America” remains the most powerful sympathetic critique of modern liberal democracy ever written. Careful reading of the text and selected secondary sources leads to examination of Tocqueville’s analysis of the defects to which the democratic passion for equality gives rise and consideration of possible solutions that, in contrast to the Marxist and Nietzschean critiques, aim at preserving the liberal democratic way of life.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016.

GOV 3210  (b)   Advanced Seminar in Political Theory: Jean-Jacques Rousseau  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 15.  

An examination of the multifaceted and revolutionary thought of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, including his critique of the Enlightenment, his rejection of classical liberalism, his defense of democracy, his relationship to the French Revolution, his contribution to Romanticism, and his views on freedom, equality, education, religion, art, economics, the family, love, and the self.

Prerequisites: GOV 1007 - 1019 or GOV 1040 - 1045 or GOV 2100 - 2399 or GOV 2800 - 2899 or GOV 2975 - 2979 or GOV 3100 - 3399 or GOV 3800 - 3899 or GOV 4005 - 4009.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

GOV 3220  (b)   Nietzsche  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 15.  

An examination of the broad range of Nietzsche’s thought with a special view to its moral and political implications. Readings include Nietzsche’s major works, including Thus Spoke Zarathustra. May also consider various twentieth-century interpretations and appropriations of Nietzsche’s philosophy.

Prerequisites: GOV 1007 - 1019 or GOV 1040 - 1045 or GOV 2100 - 2399 or GOV 2800 - 2899 or GOV 2975 - 2979 or GOV 3100 - 3399 or GOV 3800 - 3899 or GOV 4005 - 4009.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

GOV 3400  (b, IP)   Advanced Seminar in Japanese Politics  

Every Other Spring. Enrollment limit: 15.  

Analyzes the political, social, and cultural underpinnings of modern politics and asks how democracy works in Japan compared with other countries. Explores how Japan has achieved stunning material prosperity while maintaining among the best healthcare and education systems in the world, high levels of income equality, and low levels of crime. Students are also instructed in conducting independent research on topics of their own choosing. (Same as: ASNS 3300)

Prerequisites: ASNS 2320 (same as GOV 2450) or GOV 2450.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2016.

GOV 3410  (b, IP)   Capitalism and State Power in China  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 15.  

Seminar. Explores the paradoxes of contemporary China, a communist regime that boasts economic growth rates that are the envy of the world. While communism failed in Eastern Europe decades ago, the Chinese Communist Party has been surprisingly successful and leads one of the oldest dictatorships in the world. Explores how capitalism and state power actually work in China. Topics include ethnic conflict, patronage and corruption, elite politics, popular protest, elections, and civil society. Students develop and write a research paper on contemporary Chinese politics. Previous coursework in Chinese politics is not necessary. (Same as: ASNS 3060)

Prerequisites: GOV 1000 - 2969 or GOV 3000 or higher or ASNS 1000 - 2969 or ASNS 3000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

GOV 3420  (b, IP)   Governments Morals and Markets: Topics in Comparative Public Policy  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 15.  

Studies the relationship between governments and markets in policy areas such as health care, social welfare, education, media and the environment. Explores the moral and political dimensions of policy questions such as: What should or should not be for sale (e.g. drugs, healthcare, votes, pornography etc.) What justifies regulation of commercial activities? Under what circumstances, if any, should benefits such as flood insurance or tax relief for mortgages be provided with public funds? Should the government protect people from the consequences of their own choices? Cross-national case studies from the United Kingdom, USA, Japan and Europe.

Prerequisites: Two of: either GOV 1020 - 1029 or GOV 1400 or GOV 2400 - 2599 or GOV 3400 - 3599 and either GOV 1020 - 1029 or GOV 1400 or GOV 2400 - 2599 or GOV 3400 - 3599.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

GOV 3430  (b, IP)   Private Actors, Public Goods: Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in Comparative Perspective  

Every Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

From fair trade chocolate to Kimberly Process certified diamonds, voluntary sustainability initiatives increasingly "govern" complex trans-border trade -- to minimize environmental damages and human rights abuses exacerbated by globalization, especially when states prove incapable or unwilling to do so. Intensive in reading, research, and discussion, adopts a commodity-centered lens to examine transnational trade in comparative perspective. Students explore how global value chains -- like "fast fashion" from Bangladesh and cell phones from China -- defy conventional notions of political, geographic, and ecological boundaries and prompt a shift from "government" to "governance." (Same as: ENVS 3908)

Prerequisites: Two of: either ENVS 2302 or ENVS 2304 (same as GOV 2915) or ENVS 2330 (same as GOV 2910) or ENVS 2403 (same as HIST 2182) or GOV 2300 - 2599 and ENVS 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

GOV 3500  (b, IP)   Social Protest and Political Change  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 15.  

Analyzes the role of social protest in generating political change on issues such as civil rights, environmentalism, women’s rights, indigenous rights, and globalization. Begins by considering different theoretical approaches to understanding the emergence and effectiveness of social movements and non-governmental organizations. Then engages in comparative analysis of social protest in Europe, the United States, Latin America, and elsewhere, paying particular attention to the advantages and risks of the increasingly transnational nature of social activism.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

GOV 3520  (b, IP)   State-Building in Comparative Perspective  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 15.  

States form the foundation of modern politics. Comparative government explores their variation; international relations examine their interaction. States can be instruments of oppression or engines of progress, and recent scholarship has focused on their strength, weakness, and failure. This capstone course explores the processes that produced the early modern state in Europe, then looks at more recent attempts to replicate state development in Latin America, Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. The role of war in state formation and the subject of citizenship receive particular attention. (Same as: AFRS 3520)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016.

GOV 3570  (b, IP)   Advanced Seminar in African Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

The continent of Africa boasts some of the most rapidly growing economies in the world, but the proportion of people living in poverty remains higher than in any other region. Nearly all African states experimented with democratic reform in the last two decades, but many leaders have become adept at using political institutions to entrench their power. Most large-scale civil wars have ended, but violence remains. Explores the economic, political, and security challenges of this continent of contrasts. Topics include poverty and economic growth, the “resource curse,” democratic institutions, civil society, ethnic relations, state failure, foreign assistance, and intervention. (Same as: AFRS 3570)

Prerequisites: GOV 2530 (same as AFRS 2530) or AFRS 2530 or HIST 2364 (same as AFRS 2364) or AFRS 2364 (same as HIST 2364) or HIST 2822 (same as AFRS 2822).

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

GOV 3600  (b, IP)   Advanced Seminar in International Relations: Conflict Simulation and Conflict Resolution  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 15.  

An upper-level interdisciplinary seminar on the nature of both international and national conflict. A variety of contexts and influence vectors are examined and students are encouraged to look at the ways conflicts can be solved short of actual warfare, as well as by it.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

GOV 3610  (b, IP)   Advanced Seminar in International Relations: Law, Politics, and the Search for Justice  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 15.  

Examines the complex relationship between law and policy in international relations by focusing on two important and rapidly developing areas of international concern: environmental protection and humanitarian rights. Fulfills the environmental studies senior seminar requirement. (Same as: ENVS 3963)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

GOV 3620  (b, IP)   Advanced Seminar in International Relations: Counterinsurgencies  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 15.  

Counterinsurgency warfare -- the political and military struggle to obstruct insurrection -- is complex, variable, and arduous. As one US Special Forces officer in Iraq noted, counterinsurgency is not just thinking man’s warfare, it is the graduate level of war. How do we make sense of the intricate, violent contest between insurgent and counterinsurgent? Why have the United States' wars in Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan been exceedingly drawn out, irregular, and destructive? Connecting classic and critical military texts such as Clausewitz and US Army/Marine Corps operational manuals, with case studies from Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan (contrasting the US and Soviet interventions), entwines political/military theory with battlefield history to deepen understandings of thinking man’s warfare.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2016.

GOV 3630  (b, IP)   America's Place in the World, 1945 to the Present  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Following World War II, the United States was left with unrivaled material power in the international system. Focuses on how the US attempted to translate its unprecedented power into a particular global order. Begins by engaging with the academic debate over the character of US leadership through this period. During the Cold War, questions whether the US was an equal to the Soviet Union in a bipolar order, a hegemonic power, or a seeker of informal empire. Also considers what it has meant to be a unipolar power in the post-Cold War period. Then focuses on the ways in which the US has sought to create a particular political and economic order within the international system since 1945. Explores the specific tools of order creation to include establishing multilateral institutions and formal alliances, providing economic incentives, and exercising military power. Concludes by examining the contentious topic of American decline. Explores various theories about America’s future role in the world and considers in particular how the US is addressing China’s rise.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

GOV 3902  (b, IP)   Food, Environment, and Development  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines the complex socio-economic and ecological challenges in the global governance of food and agriculture. Drawing on literature in political science, environmental politics, and public policy, students wrestle with key questions central to the study of the competing yet interconnected issues of food production, environmental protection, and economic development, such as: the seeming trade-offs between feeding the world and saving the planet; the socio-ecological dimensions of agricultural biotechnology (i.e., genetically modified plants and animals); and the governance of global value chains for food and natural resources. (Same as: ENVS 3907)

Prerequisites: Two of: either ENVS 2330 (same as GOV 2910) or ENVS 2403 (same as HIST 2182) or ENVS 2302 or ENVS 2304 (same as GOV 2915) or GOV 2910 or HIST 2182 and ENVS 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.