Bowdoin College Catalogue and Academic Handbook

Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 1101  (b)   Introduction to Psychology  

Louisa Slowiaczek; Andrew Christy.
Every Semester. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 50.
  

A general introduction to the major concerns of contemporary psychology, including physiological psychology, perception, learning, cognition, language, development, personality, intelligence, and abnormal and social behavior. Recommended for first- and second-year students. Juniors and seniors should enroll in the spring semester.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015.

PSYC 2010  (b)   Infant and Child Development  

Samuel Putnam.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

A survey of major changes in psychological functioning from conception through childhood. Several theoretical perspectives are used to consider how physical, personality, social, and cognitive changes jointly influence the developing child’s interactions with the environment.

Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or Placement in above PSYC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015.

PSYC 2025  (b)   Abnormal Psychology  

Hannah Reese.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

An introduction to the phenomenology, etiology, and treatment of mental disorders. Major topics include depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia, eating disorders, and personality disorders. Current paradigms for understanding psychopathology, diagnosis and assessment, and research methods specific to clinical psychology also discussed.

Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or Placement in above PSYC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

PSYC 2030  (b)   Social Psychology  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

A survey of theory and research on individual social behavior. Topics include self-concept, social cognition, affect, attitudes, social influence, interpersonal relationships, and cultural variations in social behavior.

Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or SOC 1101 or Placement in above PSYC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

PSYC 2032  (b)   Health Psychology  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Focuses on the behavioral, cognitive, psychosocial and physiological factors that influence individual emotional health and psychological state. The course proceeds from a core perspective of the biological (i.e., neuroendocrine) basis of well-being. Covers topics such as health-enhancing and health-compromising behaviors, stress and coping, health care settings, pain and neurological and age-related disorders. Also explores the role of personality, gender interpersonal relations, and ethnic and sociocultural influences and their linkages to health, wellness, and optimal emotional well-being.

Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or Placement in above PSYC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

PSYC 2033  (b)   Positive Psychology  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

While psychological research investigates the problems facing human beings, the field—and people in general—have come to realize that life devoid of the negative is not synonymous with a life well-lived. Focuses on aspects of life that help individuals and communities flourish. Topics including emotions (past-, present-, and future-oriented), character traits (strengths and virtues), and institutions (work, school, family) and how these influence the good life are discussed. Through readings, discussions, and hands-on activities, the empirical literature on positive psychology is examined, including points of conflict and avenues for future research.

Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or Placement in above PSYC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

PSYC 2034  (b)   Psychology of Diversity  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

An introduction to the variety of human experiences, identities, and cultures in the United States and internationally. Difference in power and privilege is analyzed as they relate to various social categories such as race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, and physical ability.

Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or Placement in above PSYC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

PSYC 2040  (b)   Cognitive Psychology  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

A survey of theory and research examining how humans perceive, process, store, and use information. Topics include visual perception, attention, memory, language processing, decision making, and cognitive development.

Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or Placement in above PSYC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

PSYC 2050  (a)   Physiological Psychology  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 35.  

An introductory survey of biological influences on behavior. The primary emphasis is on the physiological regulation of behavior in humans and other vertebrate animals, focusing on genetic, developmental, hormonal, and neuronal mechanisms. Additionally, the evolution of these regulatory systems is considered. Topics discussed include perception, cognition, sleep, eating, sexual and aggressive behaviors, and mental disorders. (Same as: NEUR 2050)

Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or BIOL 1102 or BIOL 1109 or Placement in above PSYC 1101 or Placement in BIOL 2000 level.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

PSYC 2060  (a)   Cognitive Neuroscience  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 35.  

An introduction to the neuroscientific study of cognition. Topics surveyed in the course include the neural bases of perception, attention, memory, language, executive function, and decision making. In covering these topics, the course will draw on evidence from brain imaging (fMRI, EEG, MEG), transcranial magnetic stimulation, electrophysiology, and neuropsychology. Also considers how knowledge about the brain constrains our understanding of the mind. (Same as: NEUR 2060)

Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or Placement in above PSYC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

PSYC 2510  (b)   Research Design in Psychology  

Andrew Christy.
Every Semester. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

A systematic study of the scientific method as it underlies psychological research. Topics include prominent methods used in studying human and animal behavior, the logic of causal analysis, experimental and non-experimental designs, issues in internal and external validity, pragmatics of careful research, and technical writing of research reports.

Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or Placement in above PSYC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015.

PSYC 2520  (a, MCSR)   Data Analysis  

Zach Rothschild.
Every Semester. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 32.
  

An introduction to the use of descriptive and inferential statistics and design in behavioral research. Weekly laboratory work in computerized data analysis. Required of majors no later than the junior year, and preferably by the sophomore year.

Prerequisites: Two of: either BIOL 1102 or BIOL 1109 or Placement in BIOL 2000 level or PSYC 2510 and PSYC 1101 or Placement in above PSYC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015.

PSYC 2710  (b)   Laboratory in Developmental Psychology  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 20.  

Multiple methods used in developmental research are examined both by reading research reports and by designing and conducting original research studies. The methods include observation, interviews, questionnaires, and lab experiments, among others. Students learn to evaluate the relative strengths and weaknesses of both qualitative and quantitative approaches.

Prerequisites: Three of: PSYC 2010 and PSYC 2510 and PSYC 2520.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2016.

PSYC 2725  (b)    Laboratory in Clinical Psychology  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 20.  

An overview and analysis of the diverse research methods employed by clinical psychologists. Through reading, analysis, and hands-on experience, students gain an understanding of the relative merits of various approaches to understanding the nature and treatment of mental disorders. Major topics include clinical interviewing and assessment, information-processing approaches to understanding psychopathology, and the principles of behavior change. Class participation culminates with the design and conduct of an original research project.

Prerequisites: Three of: PSYC 2025 and PSYC 2510 and PSYC 2520.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

PSYC 2735  (b)   Laboratory in Social Psychology  

Zach Rothschild.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 20.
  

An examination of different research methodologies used by social psychologists, including archival research, observation, questionnaires, lab experiments, and online data collection. Students learn about the relative strengths and weaknesses of these different methodological approaches, both by reading research reports and by designing and conducting original research.

Prerequisites: Three of: either PSYC 2030 or PSYC 2032 - 2034 and PSYC 2510 and PSYC 2520.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

PSYC 2736  (b)   Laboratory in Environmental Psychology  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 20.  

Explores research methods in the psychological and emotional response to the complex environment of modern Western society. Proceeds from a perspective of the biological basis of states such as stress and well-being and related environmental stimuli to that of neuroendocrine activity.

Prerequisites: Two of: PSYC 2510 and PSYC 2520.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

PSYC 2740  (b)   Laboratory in Cognition  

Louisa Slowiaczek.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 20.
  

An analysis of research methodology and experimental investigations in cognition, including such topics as auditory and sensory memory, visual perception, attention and automaticity, retrieval from working memory, implicit and explicit memory, metamemory, concept formation and reasoning. Weekly laboratory sessions allow students to collect and analyze data in a number of different areas of cognitive psychology.

Prerequisites: Three of: PSYC 2040 and PSYC 2510 and PSYC 2520.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

PSYC 2750  (a, INS)   Laboratory in Behavioral Neuroscience: Social Behavior  

Thomas Small.
Every Year. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 20.
  

A laboratory course that exposes students to modern techniques in neuroscience that can be applied to the study of social behavior. Underlying concepts associated with various molecular, neuroanatomical, pharmacological, and electrophysiological methods are discussed in a lecture format. Students then use these techniques in laboratory preparations that demonstrate how social behavior is organized within the central nervous system of vertebrate animals, including humans. (Same as: NEUR 2750)

Prerequisites: Three of: either PSYC 2050 (same as NEUR 2050) or BIOL 2135 (same as NEUR 2135) or PSYC 2060 (same as NEUR 2060) and PSYC 2510 or either BIOL 1102 or BIOL 1109 and PSYC 2520 or either MATH 1300 or MATH 1400.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016.

PSYC 2752  (b)   Laboratory in Behavioral Neuroscience  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 20.  

A laboratory course that exposes students to modern techniques in neuroscience that can be applied to the mechanistic study of behavior. Underlying concepts associated with various behavioral, neuroanatomical, and pharmacological methods are discussed in a lecture format. Students then use some of these techniques in laboratory exercises that explore the relationships between the brain and behavior.

Prerequisites: Three of: either PSYC 2050 (same as NEUR 2050) or BIOL 2135 (same as NEUR 2135) or PSYC 2060 (same as NEUR 2060) and PSYC 2510 or either BIOL 1102 or BIOL 1109 and PSYC 2520 or either MATH 1300 or MATH 1400.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

PSYC 2775  (a, INS, MCSR)   Laboratory in Cognitive Neuroscience  

Every Year. Enrollment limit: 20.  

A laboratory course that exposes students to multiple techniques in cognitive neuroscience that can be applied to the study of human cognition. Introduces human neuroimaging methods including electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Students will then use these methods to study aspects of human cognition including perception, attention, memory, language, problem solving, reasoning, and decision making. (Same as: NEUR 2775)

Prerequisites: Three of: PSYC 2040 or either PSYC 2050 (same as NEUR 2050) or PSYC 2060 (same as NEUR 2060) or BIOL 2135 (same as NEUR 2135) and PSYC 2510 or either BIOL 1102 or BIOL 1109 or Placement in BIOL 2000 level and PSYC 2520 or either MATH 1300 or MATH 1400.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

PSYC 3010  (b)   Social Development  

Samuel Putnam.
Every Other Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 14.
  

Research and theory regarding the interacting influences of biology and the environment as they are related to social and emotional development during infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Normative and idiographic development in a number of domains, including morality, aggression, personality, sex roles, peer interaction, and familial relationships are considered.

Prerequisites: Three of: PSYC 2010 and PSYC 2510 and PSYC 2520.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

PSYC 3011  (b)   Cognitive Development  

Every Other Spring. Enrollment limit: 14.  

Examines the development of cognitive understanding and cognitive processes from infancy through adolescence. Emphasis on empirical research and related theories of cognitive development. Topics include infant perception and cognition, concept formation, language development, theory of mind, memory, problem solving, and scientific thinking.

Prerequisites: Three of: PSYC 2010 and PSYC 2510 and PSYC 2520.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2017.

PSYC 3025  (b)   Psychotherapy and Behavior Change  

Hannah Reese.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 14.
  

An in-depth study of the theory, research, and practice of contemporary psychotherapy. Major topics may include theoretical approaches to therapy, methods for studying its efficacy, processes of change, the role of the client-therapist relationship, and challenges to disseminating effective psychological treatments to the general public. Readings and discussion supplemented with video of psychotherapy sessions.

Prerequisites: Three of: either PSYC 2020 or PSYC 2025 and PSYC 2510 and PSYC 2520.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

PSYC 3026  (b)   Psychology of Trauma and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 14.  

Explores the psychological impact of many different types of trauma, including military combat, accidents, interpersonal violence, sexual assault, natural disasters, and childhood physical and sexual abuse. The emphasis is on psychological theories used to explain and treat symptoms associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Covers diagnostic methods, research on prevalence and policy issues, comorbid psychological and medical diagnoses, and social correlates. In addition to exploring the challenges associated with PTSD, addresses mechanisms of positive change following trauma (e.g., posttraumatic growth).

Prerequisites: Two of: PSYC 2025 and PSYC 2520.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017.

PSYC 3033  (b)   The Psychology of Morality and Value  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 14.  

A seminar focusing broadly on moral psychology. Primary-source readings, class discussions, and critical writing assignments center on four major sub-topics: (1) Cultural, Evolutionary, and Developmental Perspectives on Morality; (2) Moral Reasoning and Judgment; (3) Morality, Affect, and Motivation; and (4) Moral and Immoral Behavior. Beyond addressing basic moral-psychological mechanisms, this course considers how findings from moral psychology may inform solutions to personal and social problems.

Prerequisites: Three of: either PSYC 2030 or PSYC 2032 - 2034 and PSYC 2510 and PSYC 2520.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

PSYC 3034  (b, ESD)   Social Identities and Stigma  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 14.  

An advanced discussion of theory and social psychological research on identity and stigma. Topics include self and identity, self-esteem, system justification, stereotype threat, dis-identification, concealability and controllability. Why individuals stigmatize, the effects of stigmatization for low status groups, and contending with a stigmatized identity are considered.

Prerequisites: Three of: either PSYC 2030 or PSYC 2032 or PSYC 2033 or PSYC 2034 and PSYC 2510 and PSYC 2520.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

PSYC 3035  (b)   Existential Social Psychology  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 14.  

An examination of how human concerns about death, meaning, isolation, and freedom influence and motivate a wide array of human behavior. Readings and discussions address empirical research on different theories of human motivation (e.g., terror management, meaning maintenance, attachment, compensatory control, and self-determination) that enrich our understanding of topics such as intergroup conflict, religious belief, prosocial behavior, interpersonal relationships, and materialism.

Prerequisites: Three of: either PSYC 2030 or PSYC 2032 - 2034 and PSYC 2510 and PSYC 2520.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2015.

PSYC 3040  (b)   The Psychology of Language  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 14.  

An examination of psychological factors that affect the processing of language, including a discussion of different modalities (auditory and visual language) and levels of information (sounds, letters, words, sentences, and text/discourse). Emphasis is on the issues addressed by researchers and the theories developed to account for our language abilities.

Prerequisites: Three of: PSYC 2040 and PSYC 2510 and PSYC 2520.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

PSYC 3050  (a)   Hormones and Behavior  

Every Fall. Enrollment limit: 16.  

An advanced discussion of concepts in behavioral neuroendocrinology. Topics include descriptions of the major classes of hormones, their roles in the regulation of development and adult behavioral expression, and the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for their behavioral effects. Hormonal influences on reproductive, aggressive, and parental behaviors, as well as on cognitive processes are considered. (Same as: NEUR 3050)

Prerequisites: Three of: either PSYC 2050 (same as NEUR 2050) or BIOL 2135 (same as NEUR 2135) or PSYC 2060 (same as NEUR 2060) and PSYC 2510 or either BIOL 1102 or BIOL 1109 or Placement in BIOL 2000 level and PSYC 2520 or MATH 1300.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2017, Fall 2016.

PSYC 3052  (b)   Psychopharmacology, Neuroscience, and Addiction  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 14.  

Introduction to psychopharmacology of recreationally abused drugs and their effects on the brain and behavior in human and non-human species. Discusses natural and man-made substances, including alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, opioids, stimulants, cannabinoids, hallucinogens, steroids, sedatives, and inhalants. Covers basic structure and function of the nervous system, drug classification, basic principles of pharmacology, neurochemistry, structural and functional neuroimaging, neuropsychological assessment, pharmacogenomics, as well as the history and epidemiology of specific drugs of abuse and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions to limit use. (Same as: NEUR 3052)

Prerequisites: Three of: either PSYC 2050 (same as NEUR 2050) or BIOL 2135 (same as NEUR 2135) or PSYC 2060 (same as NEUR 2060) and PSYC 2510 or either BIOL 1102 or BIOL 1109 or Placement in BIOL 2000 level and PSYC 2520 or MATH 1300.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2016.

PSYC 3055  (a)   Cognitive Neuroscience of Memory  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 16.  

An advanced discussion of recent empirical and theoretical approaches to understanding the cognitive neuroscience of memory. Readings and discussions address empirical studies using neuroimaging methods. Topics include hippocampal and cortical contributions to memory encoding and retrieval and the effect of genetic variability, drugs, emotions, and sleep on memory. (Same as: NEUR 3055)

Prerequisites: Three of: either PSYC 2040 or PSYC 2050 (same as NEUR 2050) or PSYC 2060 (same as NEUR 2060) or BIOL 2135 (same as NEUR 2135) and PSYC 2520 or either MATH 1300 or MATH 1400 and Placement in BIOL 2000 level or PSYC 2510 or either BIOL 1102 or BIOL 1109.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2015.

PSYC 3056  (a)   Computational Modelling in Cognitive Neuroscience  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 14.  

A survey of cognitive neuroscience literature in which researchers have used computational models to formalize their theories. Topics include executive function, learning, attention, and decisionmaking. (Same as: NEUR 3056)

Prerequisites: Three of: either PSYC 2050 (same as NEUR 2050) or BIOL 2135 (same as NEUR 2135) or PSYC 2060 (same as NEUR 2060) and PSYC 2510 or either BIOL 1102 or BIOL 1109 or Placement in BIOL 2000 level and PSYC 2520 or MATH 1300.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

PSYC 3057  (a)   Seminar in Behavioral Neuroscience  

Thomas Small.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 14.
  

An advanced seminar covering brain mechanisms that affect behavior in humans and other animals. Topics may include the neural circuits that regulate normal social interactions, learning and memory processes, and/or higher cognitive functions, as well as the relationship between disrupted neural functions and mental disorders. The major emphasis of the course will be on reading and discussing primary research articles in the field of behavioral neuroscience. (Same as: NEUR 3057)

Prerequisites: Three of: either PSYC 2050 (same as NEUR 2050) or PSYC 2060 (same as NEUR 2060) or BIOL 2135 (same as NEUR 2135) and PSYC 2510 or either BIOL 1102 or BIOL 1109 and PSYC 2520 or either MATH 1300 or MATH 1400.