Bowdoin College Catalogue and Academic Handbook

Italian Studies (ITAL)

ITAL 1101  (c)   Elementary Italian I  

Anna Rein; Davida Gavioli.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

Three class hours per week, plus weekly drill sessions and language laboratory assignments. Study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary. Emphasis is on listening comprehension and spoken Italian.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

ITAL 1102  (c)   Elementary Italian II  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 18.  

Continuation of Italian 1101. Three class hours per week, plus weekly drill sessions and language laboratory assignments. Study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary. More attention is paid to reading and writing.

Prerequisites: ITAL 1101 or Placement in ITAL 1102.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

ITAL 1103  (c)   Accelerated Elementary Italian  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Three class hours per week, plus one hour of weekly drill and conversation sessions with a teaching fellow. Covers in one semester what is covered in two semesters in the 1101-1102 sequence. Study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary. Emphasis on listening comprehension and spoken Italian. For students with an advanced knowledge of a Romance language or by permission of instructor.

Prerequisites: Placement in FRS 2305 or Placement in HISP 2305 or Placement in ITAL 1103 or FREN 2305 or higher or SPAN 2305 (same as LAS 2205) or higher or FRS 2305 or higher or HISP 2305 (same as LAS 2205) or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

ITAL 2203  (c)   Intermediate Italian I  

Davida Gavioli.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant. Aims to increase fluency in both spoken and written Italian. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on contemporary texts of literary and social interest.

Prerequisites: ITAL 1102 or ITAL 1103 or Placement in ITAL 2203.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

ITAL 2204  (c)   Intermediate Italian II  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 18.  

Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant. Aims to increase fluency in both spoken and written Italian. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on contemporary texts of literary and social interest.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2203 or Placement in ITAL 2204.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

ITAL 2222  (c)   Dante's Divine Comedy  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

One of the greatest works of literature of all times. Dante’s Divine Comedy leads us through the torture-pits of Hell, up the steep mountain of Purgatory, to the virtual, white-on-white zone of Paradise, and then back to where we began: our own earthly lives. Accompanies Dante on his allegorical journey, armed with knowledge of Italian culture, philosophy, politics, religion, and history. Pieces together a mosaic of medieval Italy, while developing and refining abilities to read, analyze, interpret, discuss, and write about both literary texts and critical essays. Conducted in English.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

ITAL 2305  (c)   Advanced Italian I  

Arielle Saiber.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

Strengthens fluency in reading, writing, and speaking through an introduction to contemporary Italian society and culture. An advanced grammar review is paired with a variety of journalistic and literary texts, visual media, and a novel. Conducted in Italian.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2204 or Placement in ITAL 2305.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

ITAL 2408  (c, IP)   Introduction to Contemporary Italy: Dalla Marcia alla Vespa  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 18.  

In the recent past, Italy has experienced violent political, economic, and cultural changes. In short succession, it experienced fascist dictatorship, the Second World War, the Holocaust, and Civil War, a passage from monarchy to republic, a transformation from a peasant existence to an industrialized society, giving rise to a revolution in cinema, fashion, and transportation. How did all this happen? Who were the people behind these events? What effect did they have on everyday life? Answers these questions, exploring the history and the culture of Italy from fascism to contemporary Italy, passing through the economic boom, the Years of Lead, and the mafia. Students have the opportunity to relive the events of the twentieth century, assuming the identity of real-life men and women. Along with historical and cultural information, students read newspaper articles, letters, excerpts from novels and short stories from authors such as Calvino, Levi, Ginzburg, and others, and see films by directors like Scola, Taviani, De Sica, and Giordana.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2305 or Placement in ITAL 2400 level.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

ITAL 2553  (c, VPA)   Italy's Cinema of Social Engagement  

Every Other Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

An introduction to Italian cinema with an emphasis on Neorealism and its relationship to other genres, including Comedy Italian Style, the Spaghetti Western, the horror film, the "mondo" (shock documentary), and mafia movies, among others. Readings and discussions situate films within their social and historical contexts, and explore contemporary critical debates about the place of radical politics in Italian cinema (a hallmark of Neorealism), the division between art films and popular cinema, and the relevance of the concept of an Italian national cinema in an increasingly globalized world. No prerequisite required. Taught in English (films screened in Italian with English subtitles). Note: Fulfills the non-US cinema requirement for cinema studies minors. (Same as: CINE 2553)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

ITAL 2600  (c, ESD, IP)   How To Do It: Italian Renaissance Guides to Living Well  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

How can I get rich? How can I obtain power and keep it? What are “the rules” for love, sex, finding a spouse? How can I appear to be of a social class higher than I am? How can I stop being depressed? Such timeless questions were answered in innumerable advice and “how-to” manuals in the Italian Renaissance, a pre-modern period in which thoughts of self-fashioning and self-inquiry proliferated like never before. Explores a large selection of serious and satirical advice manuals on health, marriage, family, religion, education, money-making, diplomacy, war, etiquette, and patronage, and draws parallels to the advice sought and given in the name of “self-help” today. Included are works such as Machiavelli’s The Prince, Castiglione’s Book of the Courtier, Della Porta’s Natural Magic, Della Casa’s Galateo of Manners, and Ficino’s Book of Life. Conducted in English.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

ITAL 3008  (c, ESD)   Of Gods, Leopards, and 'Picciotti': Literary Representations of Sicily between Reality and Metaphor  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

In their attempt to write Sicily, nineteenth- and twentieth-century Sicilian authors have had to come to terms with a land rife with contradictions that have often been considered a reality unto themselves. Since ancient times, Sicily has been a crossroads of cultures and civilizations whose influence has created a Babel of languages, customs, and ideas that separates it from, while uniting it to, the mainland. Examines the construction of the idea of Sicily and sicilianità in the writing of twentieth-century natives like Luigi Pirandello, Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, Vitaliano Brancati, Leonardo Sciascia, Vincenzo Consolo, and Andrea Camilleri. Emphasis placed on a critical analysis of attempts to define the essence of the Sicilian character within the social and historical context of post-Unification Italy.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2408.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016.

ITAL 3009  (c, IP)   Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Medieval and Early Modern Italian Literature  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 16.  

An introduction to the literary tradition of Italy from the Middle Ages through the early Baroque period. Focus on major authors and literary movements in their historical and cultural contexts. Conducted in Italian.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2408.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

ITAL 3011  (c, IP)   The Digital Renaissance  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines the digitization of Renaissance Italy (spanning the years 1350–1650). Studies how the medium of a work impacts its interpretation and how digital humanities tools can reveal how new knowledge and creative practices developed in this rich period of innovation and experimentation. Emphasis on the unlikely genre partners in the dissemination of ideas in the period: comedy, correspondence, epic poetry, and natural science treatises. Materials include primary source texts in Italian and digital projects. Assumes no knowledge of programming or any software that will be used. Taught in Italian.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2408.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

ITAL 3016  (c)   Red, White, Green, and...Noir: Reading Italy through Crime Fiction  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines the genre of the Italian Giallo and its importance in contemporary Italian fiction. Considers critical approaches to the genre and addresses specific theoretical and cultural issues in the context of modern Italy, with specific focus on the cultural/geographic context that so thoroughly informs the Giallo. Examines the style and the formal and thematic choices of authors such as Sciascia, Scerbanenco, Macchiavelli, Lucarelli, Carlotto, and Camilleri.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2408.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

ITAL 3020  (c, IP)   Dante's "Commedia"  

Arielle Saiber.
Every Other Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

One of the greatest works of literature of all times. Dante’s “Divine Comedy” leads the reader through the torture-pits of hell, up the steep mountain of purgatory, to the virtual, white-on-white zone of paradise, and then back to where we began: our own earthly lives. Accompanies Dante on his allegorical journey, armed with knowledge of Italian culture, philosophy, politics, religion, and history. Pieces together a mosaic of medieval Italy, while developing and refining abilities to read, analyze, interpret, discuss, and write about both literary texts and critical essays. Conducted in Italian.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2408.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

ITAL 3077  (c, IP, VPA)   Divas, Stardom, and Celebrity in Modern Italy  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines Italy’s role in the evolution of the modern-day diva, star, and celebrity: from the transformation of religious icons such as the Madonna and the Magdalene into the divas, vamps, and femme fatales of early cinema to the development of silent cinema’s strongman into a model for charismatic politicians like Fascist leader Benito Mussolini and media-mogul-turned-prime-minister Silvio Berlusconi. Pays special attention to tensions between Italy’s association with cinematic realism and its growing celebrity culture in the second half of the twentieth century through today. Texts may include Cabiria, La Dolce Vita, A Fistful of Dollars, A Special Day, and The Young Pope, along with readings on key topics in star studies, such as silent stardom; stardom and genre; transnational stardom; and race, sex, and stardom. Students make use of bibliographic and archival sources to conduct independent research culminating in term papers and audiovisual essays. Note: fulfills the non-US cinema and theory requirements for Cinema Studies minors. Taught in English. (Same as: CINE 3077)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017.