Bowdoin College Catalogue and Academic Handbook

Italian Studies (ITAL)

ITAL 1101  (c)   Elementary Italian I  

Anna Rein; Davida Gavioli.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

This course is an introduction to the Italian language through the context of Italian geography and society. Students master basic grammar constructions and vocabulary and communicate about their lives, Italy, and the world. Students access numerous forms of media from literature to news feeds, music, visual art, film, and television. Three class hours per week and weekly conversation session in small groups with teaching assistants. Offered every fall.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

ITAL 1102  (c)   Elementary Italian II  

Anna Rein.
Every Spring. Spring 2020. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

This course is a continuation of Italian Studies 1101. Students expand their listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills through more complex language structures and vocabulary. Students continue to access an expanded range of media from literature to news feeds, music, visual art, film, and television. Three class hours per week and weekly conversation session in small groups with teaching assistants. Offered every spring.

Prerequisites: ITAL 1101 or Placement in ITAL 1102.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

ITAL 1103  (c)   Accelerated Elementary Italian  

Arielle Saiber.
Every Spring. Spring 2020. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Puts students’ existing knowledge of a Romance language to good use in an accelerated approach to Italian, covering in just one semester what is typically covered in the two-semester 1101-1102 sequence. Authentic materials and audiovisual resources such as music, films, television series, and news articles immerse students in contemporary Italian culture and society. Prior experience with the principal grammatical elements of French, Spanish, or another Romance language allows students to move quickly through the study of present, future, and past tenses and other key aspects of basic Italian. Three class hours per week and weekly conversation session in small groups with the Italian teaching fellow. Offered every spring.

Prerequisites: Placement in FRS 2305 or Placement in HISP 2305 or Placement in ITAL 1103 or FREN 2305 or higher or SPAN 2305 (same as LAS 2205) or higher or FRS 2305 or higher or HISP 2305 (same as LAS 2205) or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

ITAL 2203  (c)   Intermediate Italian I  

Davida Gavioli.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

The intermediate sequence develops communicative proficiency of Italian language and culture by improving upon the skills of speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural competency. Building on existing skills in Italian, it introduces students to new and more complex grammar and communicative structures. Students continue to study Italian culture, geography, and literature and explore crosscultural similarities and differences between Italy and the United States using a variety of digital, literary, and visual texts. The goal of third-semester Italian is to further improve students’ ability to speak and understand Italian, to become familiar with the use of different tenses and moods (compound tenses, imperative, conditional, subjunctive), to increase their writing skills as they begin to read different kinds of texts, from informal to literary. Three class hours per week and a weekly conversation session with the Italian teaching fellow. Offered every Fall.

Prerequisites: ITAL 1102 or ITAL 1103 or Placement in ITAL 2203.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

ITAL 2204  (c)   Intermediate Italian II  

Anna Rein.
Every Spring. Spring 2020. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

The intermediate sequence develops communicative proficiency of Italian language and culture by improving upon the skills of speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural competency. Building on existing skills in Italian, it introduces students to new and more complex grammar and communicative structures. Students continue to study Italian culture, geography, and literature and explore crosscultural similarities and differences between Italy and the United States using a variety of digital, literary, and visual texts. While speaking and listening with an emphasis on interpretational and presentational tasks continue as the center of class activity, the goal of fourth-semester Italian is to focus more intensively on reading and writing Italian. Basic literary analysis and vocabulary building are developed using the selected readings. Three class hours per week and a weekly conversation session with the Italian teaching fellow. Offered every Spring.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2203 or Placement in ITAL 2204.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

ITAL 2222  (c)   Dante's Divine Comedy  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

One of the greatest works of literature of all times. Dante’s Divine Comedy leads us through the torture-pits of Hell, up the steep mountain of Purgatory, to the virtual, white-on-white zone of Paradise, and then back to where we began: our own earthly lives. Accompanies Dante on his allegorical journey, armed with knowledge of Italian culture, philosophy, politics, religion, and history. Pieces together a mosaic of medieval Italy, while developing and refining abilities to read, analyze, interpret, discuss, and write about both literary texts and critical essays. Conducted in English.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

ITAL 2305  (c)   Advanced Italian I  

Arielle Saiber.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

This course guides students to increasing their fluency in reading, writing, and speaking through engaging various genres of Italian cultural production, contemporary Italian life, and current events. Students deepen their knowledge and practice of critical textual analysis through the study of various media (short stories, poetry, journalism, a novel, an opera libretto, a work of theater, and film), continue to solidify their mastery of Italian grammar, and augment their reading and speaking vocabulary. Regular in-class presentations and essays serve to help students express themselves with more complex and authentic spoken and written style. Conducted in Italian.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2204 or Placement in ITAL 2305.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

ITAL 2408  (c, IP)   Introduction to Contemporary Italy: Dalla Marcia alla Vespa  

Davida Gavioli.
Every Spring. Spring 2020. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

In the recent past, Italy has experienced violent political, economic, and cultural changes. In short succession, it experienced fascist dictatorship, the Second World War, the Holocaust, and Civil War, a passage from monarchy to republic, a transformation from a peasant existence to an industrialized society, giving rise to a revolution in cinema, fashion, and transportation. How did all this happen? Who were the people behind these events? What effect did they have on everyday life? Answers these questions, exploring the history and the culture of Italy from fascism to contemporary Italy, passing through the economic boom, the Years of Lead, and the mafia. Students have the opportunity to relive the events of the twentieth century, assuming the identity of real-life men and women. Along with historical and cultural information, students read newspaper articles, letters, excerpts from novels and short stories from authors such as Calvino, Levi, Ginzburg, and others, and see films by directors like Scola, Taviani, De Sica, and Giordana.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2305 or Placement in ITAL 2400 level.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

ITAL 2500  (c, IP)   World Science Fiction  

Arielle Saiber.
Non-Standard Rotation. Spring 2020. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Explores the local, global, and universal natures of the speculative genre of science fiction (SF) from the early twentieth century through the present. Highlights works from the Golden Age (late 1930s–1950s), the New Wave of the 1960s and 1970s, cyberpunk in the 1980s, and today’s various subgenres and cross-over incarnations. Approaches SF as a mode of thought-experimentation and world-building that problematizes actual and possible political, cultural, natural, human, and techno-scientific realities. Among the themes included are the human-machine interface, environmental apocalypse, the alien, and time travel. Readings include short stories from nearly every continent (a number of which are accompanied by a film or other media), scholarly writing on SF, and contemporary debates in and around SF. Does not count for the Italian minor or Romance languages and literatures major. Taught in English. (Same as: ENGL 2901)

ITAL 2553  (c, VPA)   Italy's Cinema of Social Engagement  

Every Other Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

An introduction to Italian cinema with an emphasis on Neorealism and its relationship to other genres, including Comedy Italian Style, the Spaghetti Western, the horror film, the "mondo" (shock documentary), and mafia movies, among others. Readings and discussions situate films within their social and historical contexts, and explore contemporary critical debates about the place of radical politics in Italian cinema (a hallmark of Neorealism), the division between art films and popular cinema, and the relevance of the concept of an Italian national cinema in an increasingly globalized world. No prerequisite required. Taught in English (films screened in Italian with English subtitles). Note: Fulfills the non-US cinema requirement for cinema studies minors. (Same as: CINE 2553)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

ITAL 2600  (c, ESD, IP)   How To Do It: Italian Renaissance Guides to Living Well  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

How can I get rich? How can I obtain power and keep it? What are “the rules” for love, sex, finding a spouse? How can I appear to be of a social class higher than I am? How can I stop being depressed? Such timeless questions were answered in innumerable advice and “how-to” manuals in the Italian Renaissance, a pre-modern period in which thoughts of self-fashioning and self-inquiry proliferated like never before. Explores a large selection of serious and satirical advice manuals on health, marriage, family, religion, education, money-making, diplomacy, war, etiquette, and patronage, and draws parallels to the advice sought and given in the name of “self-help” today. Included are works such as Machiavelli’s The Prince, Castiglione’s Book of the Courtier, Della Porta’s Natural Magic, Della Casa’s Galateo of Manners, and Ficino’s Book of Life. Conducted in English.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

ITAL 3008  (c, ESD)   Of Gods, Leopards, and 'Picciotti': Literary Representations of Sicily between Reality and Metaphor  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

In their attempt to write Sicily, nineteenth- and twentieth-century Sicilian authors have had to come to terms with a land rife with contradictions that have often been considered a reality unto themselves. Since ancient times, Sicily has been a crossroads of cultures and civilizations whose influence has created a Babel of languages, customs, and ideas that separates it from, while uniting it to, the mainland. Examines the construction of the idea of Sicily and sicilianità in the writing of twentieth-century natives like Luigi Pirandello, Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, Vitaliano Brancati, Leonardo Sciascia, Vincenzo Consolo, and Andrea Camilleri. Emphasis placed on a critical analysis of attempts to define the essence of the Sicilian character within the social and historical context of post-Unification Italy.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2408.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016.

ITAL 3009  (c, IP)   Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Medieval and Early Modern Italian Literature  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 16.  

An introduction to the literary tradition of Italy from the Middle Ages through the early Baroque period. Focus on major authors and literary movements in their historical and cultural contexts. Conducted in Italian.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2408.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

ITAL 3011  (c, IP)   The Digital Renaissance  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines the digitization of Renaissance Italy (spanning the years 1350–1650). Studies how the medium of a work impacts its interpretation and how digital humanities tools can reveal how new knowledge and creative practices developed in this rich period of innovation and experimentation. Emphasis on the unlikely genre partners in the dissemination of ideas in the period: comedy, correspondence, epic poetry, and natural science treatises. Materials include primary source texts in Italian and digital projects. Assumes no knowledge of programming or any software that will be used. Taught in Italian.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2408.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

ITAL 3016  (c)   Red, White, Green, and...Noir: Reading Italy through Crime Fiction  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines the genre of the Italian Giallo and its importance in contemporary Italian fiction. Considers critical approaches to the genre and addresses specific theoretical and cultural issues in the context of modern Italy, with specific focus on the cultural/geographic context that so thoroughly informs the Giallo. Examines the style and the formal and thematic choices of authors such as Sciascia, Scerbanenco, Macchiavelli, Lucarelli, Carlotto, and Camilleri.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2408.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

ITAL 3020  (c, IP)   Dante's "Commedia"  

Arielle Saiber.
Every Other Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

One of the greatest works of literature of all times. Dante’s “Divine Comedy” leads the reader through the torture-pits of hell, up the steep mountain of purgatory, to the virtual, white-on-white zone of paradise, and then back to where we began: our own earthly lives. Accompanies Dante on his allegorical journey, armed with knowledge of Italian culture, philosophy, politics, religion, and history. Pieces together a mosaic of medieval Italy, while developing and refining abilities to read, analyze, interpret, discuss, and write about both literary texts and critical essays. Conducted in Italian.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2408.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

ITAL 3077  (c, IP, VPA)   Divas, Stardom, and Celebrity in Modern Italy  

Allison Cooper.
Non-Standard Rotation. Spring 2020. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Examines Italy’s role in the evolution of the modern-day diva, star, and celebrity: from the transformation of religious icons such as the Madonna and the Magdalene into the divas, vamps, and femme fatales of early cinema to the development of silent cinema’s strongman into a model for charismatic politicians like Fascist leader Benito Mussolini and media-mogul-turned-prime-minister Silvio Berlusconi. Pays special attention to tensions between Italy’s association with cinematic realism and its growing celebrity culture in the second half of the twentieth century through today. Texts may include Cabiria, La Dolce Vita, A Fistful of Dollars, A Special Day, and The Young Pope, along with readings on key topics in star studies, such as silent stardom; stardom and genre; transnational stardom; and race, sex, and stardom. Students make use of bibliographic and archival sources to conduct independent research culminating in term papers and audiovisual essays. Note: fulfills the non-US cinema and theory requirements for Cinema Studies minors. Taught in English. (Same as: CINE 3077)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017.

ITAL 3300  (c, IP)   Mediterranean Noir: Identity and Otherness in the Mediterranean  

Elena Cueto Asin; Davida Gavioli; Meryem Belkaid.
Non-Standard Rotation. Spring 2020. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Explores Mediterranean crime fiction or “noir” (novels, short stories, graphic novels, films) whose events describe and question the society in which the crime has taken place and that actively engage with the idea of otherness. The course examines how fiction fosters questions about a paradigm of thinking and solving crimes. Does a different provenance make a difference in how one approaches crime and evil? Writers and filmmakers may include: Jean-Claude Izzo, Costa Gavras, Driss Chraïbi, Camilleri, Massimo Carlotto, Manuel Vázquez Montalbán and Alicia Giménez Bartlett. Conducted in English, with students reading works in the original language or in translation as appropriate. Includes a fourth discussion hour in either French, Italian, or Spanish, with the respective professors to be scheduled following registration. (Same as: FRS 3300, HISP 3300)

Prerequisites: Two of: either FRS 2409 (same as AFRS 2409 and LAS 2209) or FRS 2410 (same as AFRS 2412 and LAS 2210) or either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or either ITAL 2305 or ITAL 2408 and either FRS 2409 (same as AFRS 2409 and LAS 2209) or FRS 2410 (same as AFRS 2412 and LAS 2210) or either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or either ITAL 2305 or ITAL 2408.