Bowdoin College Catalogue and Academic Handbook

History (HIST)

HIST 1001  (c, FYS)   Bad Girls of the 1950s  

Jennifer Scanlon.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Explores the representation and life experiences of women who did not fit the cultural norm of suburban motherhood in 1950s America. Focuses on issues of class, race, sexuality, and gender in a decade shaped by fears about nuclear war and communism, and by social and political conformity. Topics include teenage pregnancy, women’s grassroots political leadership, single womanhood, civil rights, emergent feminism, and, finally, the enduring cultural resonance of the apron-clad 1950s mom. Engages a variety of primary and secondary sources. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: GSWS 1021)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

HIST 1009  (c, FYS)   Reacting to the Past  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Immerses students in the religious, political, and scientific culture of early modern Europe through the study of two key episodes: Henry VIII's efforts to assume control of the Church of England and Galileo's trial for heresy. Students participate in these debates through role-playing games. Each plays a historical figure and attempts to shape the course of events. After an initial set-up phase, students take charge of the class, giving speeches, writing letters, conducting secret negotiations, and otherwise working to convince their classmates of their views. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe. It also fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

HIST 1011  (c, FYS)   Health Histories  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines the histories—cultural, political, and scientific—through which what constitutes healthy individuals and healthy societies have come to be understood. These definitions are by no means obvious, and they emerge only after protracted struggle. Considers a wide variety of such debates, all set in the post-World War II United States. Possible case studies include scientific investigation into the health risks of nuclear fallout; the evolution of abortion rights before and after Roe v. Wade; the development of federal nutrition standards; artistic representation of the AIDS crisis through Tony Kushner’s “Angels in America”; and the politics of whether or not gun violence can be considered a health issue. Course writing gives students the opportunity to engage with primary sources, perform independent research, and explore the concept of public health as it exists beyond doctor’s offices and hospitals. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

HIST 1012  (c, FYS)   “Bad” Women Make Great History: Gender, Identity, and Society in Modern Europe, 1789–1945  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Focuses on the lives and works of path-breaking women who defied the norms of modern European society in order to assume extraordinary and often controversial identities in a range of fields -- as writers, scientists, performers, athletes, soldiers, and social and political activists. What does each woman’s deviance reveal about cultural constructions of identity and the self in Modern Europe; about contemporary views on issues such as women’s work, gender relations, education, marriage, sexuality, motherhood, health, and the struggle for civil and political rights? When studied together, what do these women’s experiences reveal about patterns of change and continuity with respect to definitions of masculinity versus femininity, the public versus private sphere, and the relationship of the individual to the modern state? Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe. (Same as: GSWS 1022)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

HIST 1014  (c, FYS)   Utopia: Intentional Communities in America, 1630-1997  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

An examination of the evolution of utopian visions and utopian experiments that begins in 1630 with John Winthrop’s “City upon a Hill,” explores the proliferation of both religious and secular communal ventures between 1780 and 1920, and concludes with an examination of twentieth-century counterculture communes, intentional communities, and dystopian separatists. Readings include primary source accounts by members (letters, diaries, essays, etc.), community histories and apostate exposés, utopian fiction, and scholarly historical analyses. Discussions and essays focus on teaching students how to subject primary and secondary source materials to critical analysis. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2016.

HIST 1018  (c, FYS)   Memoirs and Memory in American History  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines the ways in which Americans have remembered the past and documented their experiences in individual memoirs. Considers the tensions between memory and history, the value of memoirs as historical documents, and the extent to which memories deepen, complicate, and even convolute understanding of twentieth-century United States history. The topical focus of the seminar varies from year to year and may include immigration, labor, gender and race relations, and war. Writing-intensive, including several short papers and a family history research paper. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

HIST 1022  (c, FYS)   Science on Trial  

David Hecht.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Examines moments of scientific controversy in modern United States history. From teaching evolution to legalizing abortion to accepting climate change, science has been at the center of some of our most persistent political debates. But science is neither as objective nor as detached from society as we commonly assume; it is inextricably bound to cultural, social, and even moral norms. This course uses moments of legal and political tension to explore the complexities of how scientific knowledge is produced, disseminated, and accepted (or rejected). Case studies include the Scopes Trial, the eugenics-era decision in Buck v. Bell, lawsuits against the tobacco industry, and Roe v. Wade—as well as the making of environmental policy on questions of pesticide use and radiation exposure. Course writing gives students the opportunity to engage with a range of historical sources in science, law, policy, and media. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: US.

HIST 1023  (c)   Science, Sex, and Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines the intersection of science, sex and politics in twentieth-century United States history. Issues of sex and sexuality have been contested terrain over the past hundred years, as varying conceptions of gender, morality, and proper sexual behavior have become politically and socially controversial. Explores the way that science has impacted these debates-- often as a tool by which activists of varying political and intellectual persuasions have attempted to use notions of scientific objectivity and authority to advance their agendas. Explores debates over issues such as birth control, eugenics, abortion, and the “gay gene.” Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: GSWS 1031)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

HIST 1024  (c, FYS)   Serious Games: Critical Play for History  

Patrick Rael.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Did you know that Monopoly began life a game that criticized modern capitalism? Have you ever wondered what sense it makes that in Sid Meier’s Civilization, Abraham Lincoln can found the American tribe in 4,000 BCE? This course explores how commercial video and board games can help us understand the past. In return, understanding something about how the discipline of history works will help us think about games as representations of the past. Games to be studied and played may include: Catan, Diplomacy, Monopoly, Sid Meier’s Civilization V, Spirit Island, and Twilight Struggle. Students should expect to complete four structured writing assignments and several shorter writing assignments. The course includes a weekly evening game lab. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: US. (Same as: DCS 1024)

HIST 1026  (c, FYS)   Revolutions in the Twentieth Century  

Salar Mohandesi.
Every Other Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

The twentieth century was the great age of revolt. Dramatic social, political, and economic changes sparked revolutions across the globe. Examines revolution as a historical process, political event, and theoretical concept, exploring such questions as: why revolutions started; who participated; what participants wanted; and if these revolutions succeeded. To address these questions, investigates some of the major revolutions of the last century. Cases may include the Bolshevik Revolution, the Spanish Civil War, the Algerian War of Independence, the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution in China, and the Islamic Revolution in Iran. Concludes by reflecting on the utility of “revolution” as a category of historical analysis. Note:This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

HIST 1037  (c, FYS)   Food and Foodways in China: A Cultural History  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

A cultural history of what, when, why, and how people eat in China. Explores a history of Chinese food, and more importantly, a history of China through its food. Structured around four historical periods (antiquity, middle period, late imperial, and modern), studies the connections between food and agriculture, politics, religion, health, technology, and literature. From one perspective, examines foodways in China as cultural constructs and introduces topics such as the human adaptation, experimentation, knowledge formation, technological development, cultural appropriation, and value judgment of food. From another, discusses the material aspects of a culinary history, e.g., the biological facts, ecological sensitivities, environmental adaptation, and historical evolution of foodstuffs. In correspondence with the four historical periods, provides opportunities to prepare and eat four meals, each of them designed to convey a broader sense of historical context. The meals include: Han aristocrat’s feast (ancient), Song literati party (middle period), Hubei peasant meal (late imperial), and American Chinese takeout (modern). Meals are scheduled on Friday afternoons throughout the semester (not on regular class-meeting days). Attendance at these meals is not mandatory, but provide additional context and experience. Taken together, students are encouraged to reflect both on what food tells us about Chinese history, and how it causes us to reflect on our own everyday lives. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors.. (Same as: ASNS 1007)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

HIST 1039  (c, FYS)   Commodity Life: Objects and Histories of India  

Every Fall. Enrollment limit: 16.  

What kinds of meanings and histories are held within objects? Uses the lens of four objects in the Indian subcontinent—rice, textiles, yoga, and photography—to trace histories of knowledge and skill, of commodification and global circulation, of power relations, and of personal attachments that these objects have generated. Central is thinking through the creative but also power-laden processes of making, using, and interpreting. This approach to the creative potential of analysis infuses class writing, revision, and discussion. Note:This course is part of the following field(s) of study: South Asia. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: ASNS 1036)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

HIST 1041  (c, FYS)   Congo in Word and Image  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Introduces Congo as part of a global discussion about humanity through text, film, music, and art. Studies novels that condemned colonial and post-colonial exploitation of Congolese resources, appreciates staggering Congo art that inspired European artists, and analyzes Congo politics that produced liberators and dictators. Considers ongoing humanitarian interventions in Congo against child soldiering, genocide, and rape. By placing words and images developed by outsiders alongside those of Congolese peoples, explores both the Congo and how the Congo has been conjured as a subject of a global imagination. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Africa. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirements for history majors and minors. (Same as: AFRS 1041)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

HIST 1046  (c, FYS)   'Deviant' Lives in Latin America  

Javier Cikota.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Explores the lives of particular Latin American people who found themselves being "boxed in," and the ways in which they have sought to remain outside, or even in-between, categories. We will consider issues of personal identity, social belonging, and state power through the lives and stories—some well-known, and some surprisingly obscure—of Latin Americans, from the 1500s to the present. Course writing gives students the opportunity to engage with primary sources, perform independent research, and explore how personal identities have been created, maintained, and challenged over the centuries. This course aims to improve students’ skills in close reading, critical thinking, and analytical writing, while the relationships between these skills are closely considered. In addition to discussing the texts in class, students will write responses to them in a variety of forms, from close analysis, to creative projects, to a final research paper. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for History majors and minors. (Same as: LAS 1046)

HIST 1111  (c, ESD, IP)   History of Ancient Greece: From Homer to Alexander the Great  

Robert Sobak.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 50.
  

Surveys the history of Greek-speaking peoples from the Bronze Age (ca. 3000-1100 B.C.E) to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C.E. Traces the political, economic, social, religious, and cultural developments of the Greeks in the broader context of the Mediterranean world. Topics include the institution of the polis (city-state); hoplite warfare; Greek colonization; the origins of Greek science; philosophy and rhetoric; and fifth-century Athenian democracy and imperialism. Necessarily focuses on Athens and Sparta, but attention is also given to the variety of social and political structures found in different Greek communities. Special attention is given to examining and attempting to understand the distinctively Greek outlook in regard to gender, the relationship between human and divine, freedom, and the divisions between Greeks and barbarians (non-Greeks). A variety of sources -- literary, epigraphical, archaeological -- are presented, and students learn how to use them as historical documents. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe. It fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: CLAS 1111)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

HIST 1112  (c, ESD, IP)   History of Ancient Rome: From Romulus to Justinian  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 50.  

Surveys the history of Rome from its beginnings to the fourth century A.D. Considers the political, economic, religious, social, and cultural developments of the Romans in the context of Rome’s growth from a small settlement in central Italy to the dominant power in the Mediterranean world. Special attention is given to such topics as urbanism, imperialism, the influence of Greek culture and law, and multiculturalism. Introduces different types of sources -- literary, epigraphical, archaeological, etc. -- for use as historical documents. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe. It fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: CLAS 1112)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

HIST 1140  (c, ESD, IP)   Medieval, Renaissance, and Reformation Europe  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 50.  

Introductory-level lecture. A wide-ranging introduction to pre-modern European history beginning with the reign of the Roman Emperor Constantine (c. 306–337) and concluding with the Council of Trent (1545–1563). Particular attention is paid to the varying relations between church and state, the birth of urban culture and economy, institutional and popular religious movements, and the early formation of nation states. Not open to students who have credit for History 2049 (Early Modern Europe) or 2048 (Medieval Europe). Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe. It also meets the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

HIST 1240  (c, ESD, IP)   War and Society  

Patrick Rael.
Every Other Year. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 50.
  

Explores the nature of warfare from the fifteenth century to the present. The central premise is that war is a reflection of the societies and cultures that wage it. This notion is tested by examining the development of war-making in Europe and the Americas from the period before the emergence of modern states, through the great period of state formation and nation building, to the present era, when the power of states to wage war in the traditional manner seems seriously undermined. Throughout, emphasis is placed on contact between European and non-European peoples. Students are required to view films every week outside of class. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe; United States.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2016.

HIST 1241  (c, ESD)   The Civil War Era  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 50.  

Examines the coming of the Civil War and the war itself in all its aspects. Considers the impact of changes in American society, the sectional crisis and breakdown of the party system, the practice of Civil War warfare, and social ramifications of the conflict. Includes readings of novels and viewing of films. Students are expected to enter with a basic knowledge of American history, and a commitment to participating in large class discussions. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: AFRS 1241)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

HIST 1320  (c)   Racial and Ethnic Conflict in American Cities  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 50.  

American cities have been historic cauldrons of racial and ethnic conflict. Concentrates on urban violence in American cities since 1898. Students study moments of conflict during the early republic and the nineteenth century. Topics examined include the post-Reconstruction pogroms that overturned interracial democracy; the Red Summer and its historical memory; the ways race and ethnicity shaped urban residential space; the effects of immigration on urban political economy and society, and the conflicts over space, labor, and social relations that arose; and the waves of urban violence that spread across the country in the mid-1960s. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: AFRS 1320)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2016.

HIST 1340  (c, ESD)   America and the Origins of Globalization  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 50.  

From the fifteenth century through the early nineteenth, global economic forces integrated the lands, ecosystems, and communities of North America into an increasingly tightly-knit network of commerce, migration, and ideas. Topics covered while exploring these early global networks include: the spread of peoples, crops, and diseases; the role of colonial conquest in creating modern capital and commodity markets; the importance of addictive substances (like sugar and tobacco) in the development of the transatlantic slave trade; and how a drought in Bangladesh sparked the American Revolution. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States, Atlantic Worlds. It fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2017.

HIST 1440  (c, IP)   Merchants, Mughals, Mendicants: India and the Early Modern World  

Rachel Sturman.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 50.
  

Introductory exploration of the history of the Indian subcontinent and its connections to the broader world in an era shaped by the vibrant movement of people, goods, and ideas across the Indian Ocean, Europe, and Central Asia. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: South Asia. It also fulfills the non Euro/US and pre-modern requirements for history majors and minors. (Same as: ASNS 1560)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

HIST 1460  (c, ESD, IP)   Apartheid's Voices: South African History, 1948 to 1994  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 35.  

The study of apartheid in South Africa, the system of racial and ethnic segregation that began in 1948 and ended with the first democratic election of Nelson Mandela in 1994. Explores the many different aspects of apartheid: how and why it emerged; its social and economic impacts; its relationship to other forms of segregation and racial-based governance; and how people lived under, resisted, and collaborated with apartheid. The readings, lectures, and class discussions focus on personal South African voices and explore their diverse gendered, ethnic, and racial perspectives. NOTE: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Africa and Atlantic Worlds. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: AFRS 1460)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

HIST 2006  (c)   City, Anti-City, and Utopia: Building Urban America  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Explores the evolution of the American city from the beginning of industrialization to the present age of mass communications. Focuses on the underlying explanations for the American city’s physical form by examining cultural values, technological advancement, aesthetic theories, and social structure. Major figures, places, and schemes in the areas of urban design and architecture, social criticism, and reform are considered. Semester-long research paper required. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: ENVS 2444)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

HIST 2008  (c, IP)   The Republic of Rome and the Evolution of Executive Power  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines in depth the approaches to leadership within the governmental system that enabled a small, Italian city-state to take eventual control of the Mediterranean world and how this state was affected by its unprecedented military, economic, and territorial growth. Investigates and re-imagines the political maneuverings of the most famous pre-Imperial Romans, such as Scipio Africanus, the Gracchi, and Cicero, and how political institutions such as the Roman Senate and assemblies reacted to and dealt with military, economic, and revolutionary crises. Looks at the relationship of the Roman state to class warfare, the nature of electoral politics, and the power of precedent and tradition. While examining whether the ultimate fall precipitated by Caesar's ambition and vision was inevitable, also reveals what lessons, if any, modern politicians can learn about statesmanship from the transformation of the hyper-competitive atmosphere of the Republic into the monarchical principate of Augustus. All sources, such as Livy's history of Rome, Plutarch's “Lives,” letters and speeches of Cicero, and Caesar's “Civil War,” are in English, and no prior knowledge of Roman antiquity is required. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: CLAS 2214)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2017.

HIST 2009  (c, ESD, IP)   Egypt at the Margins  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Considers marginal people and places in Egypt from the time of Alexander the Great until the Arab Conquest. Provides a broad-stroke account of the history of Greco-Roman Egypt, but readings and discussion focus on groups at the margins of society (bandits, fugitives, and strikers), groups marginalized by society (slaves, women, and religious minorities), and marginal places (frontier zones, deserts, and the Delta marshes). These topics are evaluated using theoretical work written by social historians alongside primary sources from Egypt. Special attention given to Egypt’s rural/urban divide; its intersecting religions, legal codes, and social norms; and parallels to modern, globalized societies. Examines the unique insights Egypt’s papyri offer historians studying these issues by comparing documentary and literary sources. All readings are in English. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: CLAS 2233)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2016.

HIST 2017  (c, IP)   Postwar Europe: 1945 to the Present  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 35.  

When the Second World War finally came to a close in 1945, an estimated 36.5 million Europeans lay dead, many of Europe’s cities were burned out, economies were left in disarray, and refugee camps brimmed with displaced persons. How did Europe rebuild after this unprecedented cataclysm? Explores the history of Europe—from Great Britain to the Soviet Union, Greece to Scandinavia—from the end of the war to the present. Investigates such themes as the origins of the Cold War, the construction of socialism in the East, the reconstruction of capitalism in the West, decolonization, the postwar economic “miracle,” the social struggles of the 1960s and 1970s, the rise of neoliberalism, the collapse of the Soviet Bloc, the emergence of the European Union, and the contemporary political conjuncture. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017.

HIST 2018  (c, ESD, IP)   North American Indian History, c. 1450-1814  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 35.  

The indigenous peoples of North America have long and diverse histories stretching back over 15,000 years. Since the uniting of the world’s two hemispheres at the turn of the sixteenth century, native communities have faced numerous challenges and fallen victim to often unimaginable hardship. Native cultures showed considerable adaptability in the face of these challenges. Through centuries of imperial oppression, American Indians proved determined in fighting for their rights and insisting on their proper place in an evolving environmental, political, and social landscape. These shared struggles led to a dawning sense of a pan-Indian racial and cultural identity in the early nineteenth century. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States.Note: It fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

HIST 2019  (c, ESD, IP)   The Transatlantic Sixties and Seventies  

Every Other Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

From Berkeley to Berlin, social movements in the 1960s and 1970s pushed democracy in new directions, overturned social roles, and redefined the meaning of politics. Investigates that wave of transatlantic social, political, and cultural contestation, exploring such themes as youth protest, anti-racism, anti-imperialism, feminism, and the counterculture. Taking a transnational approach, considers not only how these decades unfolded in different countries, but also unearths the many flows¬ ¬of ideas, objects, and people that wove diverse movements together. Focuses on developments in North America and Europe and situates them in a fully global context. Note:This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe, United States, and Atlantic Worlds.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018.

HIST 2020  (c, IP)   The Global Cold War  

Salar Mohandesi.
Every Other Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

The Cold War was not simply a rivalry between two superpowers but a fully global competition between different models of social, political, and economic development. After reviewing the consolidation of fascism, welfare capitalism, and Stalinism in the 1930s, we study how the precarious alliance between American capitalism and Soviet communism devolved into open conflict after WWII. Since this competition unfolded on a planetary level, with each side struggling to convince the world that its model was superior, this course takes a global approach, surveying such events as the division of Europe, decolonization in Asia and Africa, the wars in Korea and Afghanistan, the Cuban and Iranian revolutions, the civil war in Angola, the rise of Reagan and Gorbachev, and the collapse of the Soviet Bloc. In so doing, this course explores such themes as imperialism, revolution, modernization, democratization, nation-building, internationalism, non-alignment, human rights, and neoliberalism.

HIST 2040  (c)   Science, Magic, and Religion  

Dallas Denery.
Every Other Year. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Traces the origins of the scientific revolution through the interplay between late-antique and medieval religion, magic, and natural philosophy. Particular attention is paid to the conflict between paganism and Christianity, the meaning and function of religious miracles, the rise and persecution of witchcraft, and Renaissance hermeticism. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe. It also meets the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors.. (Same as: REL 2204)

Prerequisites: HIST 1140.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

HIST 2042  (c)   The Good Life: From Plato to the Present  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 35.  

What does it mean to lead a good life, a happy life? Examines changing responses to this question from the ancient Greeks to the twenty-first century. Primary sources include (among others) Plato, Aristotle, Christine de Pizan, Martin Luther, and Albert Camus. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe. It also meets the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2016.

HIST 2049  (c)   Early Modern Europe  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

A survey of European culture and society from the later Middle Ages to the origins of the Enlightenment. Topics include the Renaissance, Reformation, and Scientific Revolution. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

HIST 2060  (c, ESD, IP)   The French Revolution  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 35.  

In just a few short decades, France ricocheted from a monarchy to a republic and back to a monarchy again, all while living through a cataclysmic revolution that changed the world. Questions studied include: Why did France have a revolution? Why did the revolution become radical? What were the global consequences of events in France? Class sessions will incorporate lecture, discussion, and role-playing. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe. It also fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2017.

HIST 2061  (c, ESD, IP)   Culture Wars in the Age of Enlightenment  

Every Other Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines a series of intellectual, political, and cultural feuds in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe, the so-called Age of Enlightenment. Thinkers aspired to implement sweeping changes in politics and society, but disagreed fiercely over what and how to change. Topics include atheism, science, political philosophy, sex and gender, and race. In addition to lectures and discussions, devotes several course sessions to an immersive role-playing game. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe. It also fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016.

HIST 2062  (c, IP)   Europe's Age of Expansion, 1607-1789  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

The practice of European politics changed dramatically during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. National governments became more centralized and more powerful. At the same time, Europeans attempted to found empires that stretched around the globe. Focuses on Britain, France, and Spain; specific topics include cross-cultural encounters, fiscal crisis and reform, policing, commerce, war, and rebellion. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe, Atlantic Worlds, and Colonial Worlds. It also fulfills the premodern requirement for history majors.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

HIST 2063  (c, ESD, IP)   Challenging the Catholic Church, 1529-1633  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Immerses students in the religious, political, and scientific culture of early modern Europe through the study of two key moments: the trial of Galileo Galilei for heresy and the efforts of King Henry VIII to divorce his wife and assume control of the Church of England. These episodes famously pitted these individuals against the Catholic Church, allowing consideration of how religion shaped the history of ideas and politics in this volatile period. Employs well-developed classroom simulations in which students take on roles of historical personae, allowing them to think through the broad forces shaping history as well as the potential for individual actors to affect change. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe. It also fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

HIST 2105  (c, ESD, IP)   The Making of Modern Europe, 1815 to 1918  

Every Other Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Survey course of the nineteenth century in Europe, from 1815 to the end of the First World War, with an emphasis on the social, cultural, and political impact of industrial and technological progress. Explores the way people lived and thought about the world around them as Europe industrialized, as well as the ambivalence that many Europeans came to attach to modernity by the end of the Great War in 1918. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016.

HIST 2107  (c, ESD)   The Red World: Living the Russian Revolution, 1917-1936  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

In celebration of the centennial of the Russian Revolutions of 1917, this course offers an overview of the revolutionary experience and an in-depth exploration of Soviet efforts to transform society and culture along socialist lines. With an emphasis on the tensions between the utopian and the “real”, and between official and “popular” culture, we will draw heavily on visual sources (art, posters, film, photography) and contemporary literature to examine the impact of socialist thought and practice on different aspects of everyday life, including work and education, family and gender roles, religion, science and technology, housing and urban planning, fashion, the arts, and leisure. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

HIST 2108  (c, ESD, IP)   The History of Russia, 1725-1924  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Explores Russian society, culture, and politics during three dramatically different phases of the modern period: the Old Regime under the Tsars in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; the violent, revolutionary transformations of 1905 and 1917; and the founding years of socialist rule under Lenin and the Bolsheviks. Readings draw from a diverse range of primary sources (including petitions, letters, memoirs, official proclamations, ethnographic accounts) as well as secondary works written by leading scholars. Also draws widely on contemporary visual culture (including, but not limited to painting, photography, and film). Note: This course Fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

HIST 2109  (c, ESD, IP)   Russia's Twentieth Century: Revolution and Beyond  

Page Herrlinger.
Every Other Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Examines major transformations in Russian society, culture, and politics from the Revolutions of 1917 through the fall of the Soviet Empire in 1991. Topics include the building of socialist society under Lenin and Stalin, the political Terror of the 1930s and the expansion of the Gulag system, the experience of World War II, Soviet influence in Central Asia and Eastern Europe, attempts at de-Stalinization under Khrushchev, everyday life under “developed socialism,” the period of “glasnost” and “perestroika” under Gorbachev, and the problems of de-Sovietization in the early 1990s. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

HIST 2121  (c, ESD)   Colonial America and the Atlantic World, 1607-1763  

Every Other Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

A social history of the emigration to and founding and growth of the colonies in British North America. Explores the difficulties of creating a new society, economy, polity, and culture in an unfamiliar and already inhabited environment; the effects of diverse regional and national origins, and often conflicting goals and expectations on the early settlement and development of the colonies; the gradual adaptations and changes in European, Native American, and African cultures, and their separate, combined, and often contested contributions to a new provincial, increasingly stratified (socially, economically, and politically), and regionally disparate culture; and the later problems of maturity and stability as the thirteen colonies began to outgrow the British imperial system and become a new American society. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States, Colonial Worlds. It fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

HIST 2123  (c, ESD)   American Society in the New Nation, 1763–1840  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

A social history of the United States from the Revolution to the Age of Jackson. Topics include the various social, economic, political, cultural, and ideological roots of the movement for American independence; the struggle to determine the scope of the Constitution and the political shape of the new republic; the emergence of and contest over a new social and cultural order and the nature of American “identity”; and the diverging social, economic, and political histories of regions (North, South, and trans-Appalachian West) and peoples in the early to mid-nineteenth century. Topics include urbanization, industrialization, and the development of new forms of social organization in the North; religion and the Second Great Awakening; the westward expansion of the nation into areas already occupied; the southern plantation economy and slave communities; and the growth of the reform impulse in Jacksonian America. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2015.

HIST 2126  (c, ESD)   Women in American History, 1600-1900  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 35.  

A social history of American women from the colonial period through the nineteenth century. Examines women’s changing roles in both public and private spheres; the circumstances of women’s lives as these were shaped by class, ethnic, and racial differences; the recurring conflict between the ideals of womanhood and the realities of women’s experience; and focuses on family responsibilities, paid and unpaid work, religion, education, reform, women’s rights, and feminism. Note:This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: GSWS 2251)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2016.

HIST 2128  (c, ESD)   Family and Community in American History, 1600–1900  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the social, economic, and cultural history of American families from 1600 to 1900, and the changing relationship between families and their kinship networks, communities, and the larger society. Topics include gender relationships; racial, ethnic, cultural, and class variations in family and community ideals, structures, and functions; the purpose and expectations of marriage; philosophies of child-rearing; organization of work and leisure time; and the effects of industrialization, urbanization, immigration, and social and geographic mobility on patterns of family life and community organization. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: GSWS 2248)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

HIST 2129  (c)   History of Harpswell and the Coast of Maine  

Olaf Ellers; Amy Johnson; Sarah McMahon; Steven Allen; Brittany Jellison.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 12.
  

Examines the long history of Harpswell as part of the coast of Maine, and the research methodologies used to uncover and analyze that history from environmental, community, socioeconomic, political, racial and ethnic, and cultural perspectives. Topics include bonds and tensions in a peninsula and islands community; coastal agriculture and stone walls; inshore and deep-sea fisheries; shipbuilding and shipping; the Civil War; ethnic, religious, and cultural diversity; poverty and living on the margin; and the rise of tourism. Culminates with an individual research project prospectus for a projected essay on an aspect of that history. Taught in residence at the Schiller Coastal Studies Center. History 2129/Environmental Studies 2449 is a course-module in the Bowdoin Marine Science Semester. Harpswell and Maine Coast History is a course-module in the Bowdoin Marine Science Semester and is taught with three other co-requisite courses. Note: This course is a part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: ENVS 2449)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

HIST 2140  (c, ESD)   The History of African Americans, 1619-1865  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the history of African Americans from the origins of slavery in America through the death of slavery during the Civil War. Explores a wide range of topics, including the establishment of slavery in colonial America, the emergence of plantation society, control and resistance on the plantation, the culture and family structure of enslaved African Americans, free black communities, and the coming of the Civil War and the death of slavery. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: AFRS 2140)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

HIST 2141  (c, ESD)   The History of African Americans from 1865 to the Present  

Every Other Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Explores the history of African Americans from the end of the Civil War to the present. Issues include the promises and failures of Reconstruction, the Jim Crow era, black leadership and protest institutions, African American cultural styles, industrialization and urbanization, the world wars, the Civil Rights Movement, and conservative retrenchment. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: AFRS 2141)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2016.

HIST 2143  (b)   Political Economy of the United States from Revolution to Reconstruction  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 50.  

An interdisciplinary study of the first hundred years of the United States. Explores a range of topics through the lenses of economics, politics, and history: the formation of the American system of governance, the implications of a growing market economy and the territory it encompassed, the politics and economics of slavery, notions of civic inclusion and exclusion, and the shifting intellectual bases of American economic and political life. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: ECON 2143, GOV 2090)

Prerequisites: ECON 1050 or ECON 1101 or Placement in ECON 1102 or Placement in earned ECON 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

HIST 2144  (c)   Reacting to Democracy  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 28.  

Explores the nature of democracy in two distinct historical eras: ancient Greece and the founding of the United States. Employs well-developed classroom simulations. The first half of the semester runs "The Threshold of Democracy: Athens in 403 BCE"; the second, "America’s Founding: The Constitutional Convention of 1787." Students take on roles of historical personae in both of these simulations, which permit them to explore critical events and ideas in novel ways. Pairing games that explore the foundations of democracy in both ancient and modern times permits exploration of this important topic across time and space. (Same as: CLAS 2210)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

HIST 2160  (c, ESD)   History of the American West  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Survey of what came to be called the Western United States from the nineteenth century to the present. Topics include Euro-American relations with Native Americans; the expansion and growth of the federal government into the West; the exploitation of natural resources; the creation of borders and national identities; race, class, and gender relations; the influence of immigration and emigration; violence and criminality; cities and suburbs; and the enduring persistence of Western myths in American culture. Students write several papers and engage in weekly discussion based upon primary and secondary documents, art, literature, and film.This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: ENVS 2432)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

HIST 2161  (c, ESD)   Asian American History, 1850 to the Present  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Surveys the history of Asian Americans from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Explores the changing experiences of Asian immigrants and Asian Americans within the larger context of American history. Major topics include immigration and migration, race relations, anti-Asian movements, labor issues, gender relations, family and community formation, resistance and civil rights, and representations of Asian Americans in American popular culture. Readings and course materials include scholarly essays and books, primary documents, novels, memoirs, and films.This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: ASNS 2880)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

HIST 2180  (c, ESD, IP)   Natives, Borderlands, and Empires in Early North America  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Survey of the making of North America from initial contact between Europeans and Africans and Native Americans to the creation of the continent’s three largest nations by the mid-nineteenth century: Canada, Mexico, and the United States. Topics include the history of native populations before and after contact; geopolitical and imperial rivalries that propelled European conquests of the Americas; evolution of free and coerced labor systems; environmental transformations of the continent’s diverse landscapes and peoples; formation of colonial settler societies; and the emergence of distinct national identities and cultures in former European colonies. Students write several papers and engage in weekly discussion based upon primary and secondary documents, art, literature, and material culture. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States, Atlantic Worlds, Colonial Worlds, and Latin America. (Same as: ENVS 2425, LAS 2180)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2016.

HIST 2182  (c, ESD)   Environment and Culture in North American History  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Explores relationships between ideas of nature, human transformations of the environment, and the effect of the physical environment upon humans through time in North America. Topics include the “Columbian exchange” and colonialism; links between ecological change and race, class, and gender relations; the role of science and technology; literary and artistic perspectives of “nature”; agriculture, industrialization, and urbanization; and the rise of modern environmentalism. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: ENVS 2403)

Prerequisites: ENVS 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

HIST 2200  (c, IP)   The Nuclear Age  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Explores the impact of nuclear energy on American society, politics, and culture. Few aspects of post-World War II United States history were unaffected by the atomic bomb, which decisively shaped the Cold War, helped define the military-industrial complex, and contributed to profound changes in the place of science in American life. Examines the surprisingly varied effects of the atomic bomb throughout American society: on the Cold War, consumer culture, domestic politics, education, family life, and the arts. Uses a wide range of sources—such as newspaper articles, memoirs, film, and policy debates — to examine the profound effects of nuclear energy in United States history. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2015.

HIST 2202  (c)   The History of Energy  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Explores how and why Americans (and others) have made the energy choices that they have. The production and distribution of energy is one of the key challenges for modern societies. It involves the development of specific technologies and industries- from fossil fuels to solar power to nuclear plants. But the history of energy transcends the technical. It intersects with law, politics, and economics; social norms and cultural values play a role as well. The connections between the technical and non-technical are central to understanding both the history of energy itself, as well as its place in the history of the modern Unites States.This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: ENVS 2420)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

HIST 2220  (c)   Civil Rights and Black Power Movements in the Making of Modern America  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the political activism, cultural expressions, and intellectual history that gave rise to a modern black freedom movement and its impact on the broader American (and international) society. Students study the emergence of community organizing traditions in the southern black belt as well as postwar black activism in US cities; the role the federal government played in advancing civil rights legislation; the internationalism of African American activism; and the relationship between black culture, aesthetics, and movement politics. The study of women and gender are a central component. Using biographies, speeches, and community and organization studies, students analyze the lives and contributions of Martin Luther King Jr., Ella Baker, Septima Clark, Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael, Angela Davis, Huey Newton, and Fannie Lou Hamer, among others. Closely examines the legacies of the modern black freedom movement including the expansion of the black middle class, controversies over affirmative action, and the rise of black elected officials. Note: This course is part of the following filed(s) of study: United States. (Same as: AFRS 2240)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

HIST 2222  (c)   United States History Since 1945: Truman to Trump  

Every Other Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

How did the United States become the nation it is today? Explores how the US emerged as a global super power after World War II (1945); navigated through contentious domestic socal movements, such as the civil rights movement and feminism; changed culturally and socially; fought--and won--the global Cold War; responded to the terrorist attacks of 9-11; elected Barack H. Obama as president in 2008; and then elected Donald J. Trump as president in 2016. Through a close study of specific political, economic, social, and cultural themes; how they changed throughout six distinct time periods; and with attention to key primary sources from the eras under consideration; provides an analytical narative survey of how the United States changed since 1945 and arrived at its current moment in national and global history. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

HIST 2237  (c)   From Tyranny to Democracy: Models of Political Freedom in Ancient Greece  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Most Greek city-states entered the Archaic Period as aristocracies, but exited the Classical Period as democracies. This transition was marked by the brief but widespread emergence of individual rulers: tyrants. Analyzes how tyranny, surprisingly, was a precursor to democracy. Readings include Herodotus and Plato, as well as drinking songs, inscriptions, and curse poetry. Secondary scholarship includes studies of modern popular resistance to despotic regimes, networks of economic associations as foundations for popular governance, and game-theoretic approaches to collective action problems. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe. It fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: CLAS 2777)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

HIST 2238  (c)   Thucydides and the Invention of Political Theory  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Thucydides is arguably the classical author who speaks to our present moment most clearly. He is cited as an authority on US-China relations, on the twin crises of democratic governance and ideology, on the rise of populist politics, and is generally recognized as the founder of the study of international relations. A sustained and focused reading of the Peloponnesian War is central to this course of study. Students also read selections from other ancient Athenian authors, such as Euripides, Plato, and Aristotle, as well as modern scholarly interpretations. All readings in English. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe. It fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: CLAS 2787)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

HIST 2287  (c, ESD, IP)   Race and Culture in Brazil: The Paradox of Progress  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Brazil is a country of paradoxes. Often hailed as an example of egalitarian race relations and a model for accepting difference, Brazil is also frequently cited for its economic inequality, incidence of violence, and uneven development—all of which cut along the lines of race and class. Explores the unique contradictions shaping Brazilian society, from the colonial period until the present. Discusses the visual representations of conquest, slavery, the creation of republican symbols, authoritarianism, race and racism, and social movements, as well as the construction of a national identity though music and other artistic expressions. Pays close attention to the ways in which Brazilian culture and society have been shaped by race, class, and other relations of power and exclusion. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: LAS 2171)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

HIST 2292  (c)   Modern Middle Eastern History  

Idriss Jebari.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Offers a chronological and thematic overview of the modern history of the Middle East and North Africa. Covers the period from the dismantling of the Ottoman Empire after World War I to the 2011 Arab uprisings. Studies the formation of the modern state system and the historical roots and developments of long-standing conflicts including the Arab and Israeli wars, the emergence of ideological radicalism, and the political riots and revolutions that have shaken the region. Seeks to examine the region’s history beyond “War and Peace” by considering essential social and cultural transformations associated with the formation and fragmentation of nation-states in this region, including the role of colonial legacies, resources and economic distribution, social modernization, conflicting cultures, and sectarian strife, among others. Makes use of secondary literature and a variety of primary sources in English translation. Note: This course fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for History majors and minors.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017.

HIST 2293  (c, IP)   Arab Intellectual History  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Offers an overview of the topics and themes that have shaped the modern intellectual tradition of the Arab world in the modern period. Investigates the crucial interplay between the profound transformations the Arab region has experienced during the past two centuries with the way their intellectuals have made sense of them and formulated visions for change from the nineteenth century to the events of the Arab Spring. Covers debates such as the Arab Renaissance and the liberal age, the development of nationalist ideologies and pan-Arabism, third-world revolutionary ideologies, the Islamic revival and Islamic revolutionary ideology, and calls for democratization. Note: This course fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for History majors and minors.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

HIST 2294  (c, IP)    Cities and the Urban Experience in Latin America  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

By looking at the history of key cities and the challenges of urban life in Latin America, this seminar examines how the city has served as a site of contestation and politics throughout the region. Topics discussed in the seminar will include top-down efforts to impose order and discipline on the city and the response of urban dwellers; planned and unplanned urban spaces; the rise of slums; marginality; informality; and the formation of urban identities. We will also analyze the role of cities in the construction of social and political rights and explore the city as a site of creativity. The course will focus primarily on 20th century cities but will also explore urban life in the 19th Century and the colonial period, to a lesser extent. Special attention will be paid to the following cities: Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Mexico City, Oaxaca, Buenos Aires, Santiago, Caracas, and Brasilia. Note: This course is part of the following field(s of study: Latin America. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: LAS 3142)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

HIST 2295  (c, IP)   Toward the Arab Spring in North Africa: Colonialism, Nation-Building and Popular Uprisings  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

The 2011 uprisings that began in Tunisia sparked a wave of revolutions in the Arab region. Protesters demanded dignity, social justice, and the fall of authoritarian regimes. The Arab Spring was the latest instance in a long tradition of popular contestation in in Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia, and Libya. This course will explore the historical relationship between rulers and ruled populations and their contentious history from colonialism to the present by focusing on conflicts of a political, social, economic, and cultural nature. The course explores how popular protests evolved along the way and the different roles they have applied during these countries’ transformations in the past century. Examples will include anti-colonial protests, anti-imperial solidarity movements, trade unions and workers marches, armed regional insurrections, student mobilization on university campuses, cultural dissidence, Berber contestation, anti-austerity riots, Islamist politics, and civil society activism. . Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Africa. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for History majors and minors. (Same as: AFRS 2820)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

HIST 2320  (c, IP)   The Emergence of Chinese Civilization  

Ya Zuo.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Introduction to ancient Chinese history (2000 B.C.E. to 800 C.E.). Explores the origins and foundations of Chinese civilization. Prominent themes include the inception of the imperial system, the intellectual fluorescence in classical China, the introduction and assimilation of Buddhism, the development of Chinese cosmology, and the interactions between early China and neighboring regions. Class discussion of historical writings complemented with literary works and selected pieces of the visual arts. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors. (Same as: ASNS 2010)

HIST 2321  (c, ESD, IP)   Late Imperial China  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Introduction to late imperial China (800 to 1800) as the historical background to the modern age. Begins with the conditions shortly before the Golden Age (Tang Dynasty) collapses, and ends with the heyday of the last imperial dynasty (Qing Dynasty). Major topics include the burgeoning of modernity in economic and political patterns, the relation between state and society, the voice and presence of new social elites, ethnic identities, and the cultural, economic, and political encounters between China and the West. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the pre-modern and non Euro/US requirements for history majors and minors. (Same as: ASNS 2011)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017.

HIST 2322  (c, IP)   China's Path to Modernity: 1800 to Present  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Introduction to modern and contemporary Chinese history. Covers the period from the nineteenth century, when imperial China encountered the greatest national crisis in its contact with the industrial West, to the present People's Republic of China. Provides historical depth to an understanding of the multiple meanings of Chinese modernity. Major topics include: democratic and socialist revolutions, assimilation of Western knowledge and thought, war, imperialism, the origin, development, and unraveling of the Communist rule. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors.. (Same as: ,ASNS 2012)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

HIST 2342  (c, ESD, IP)   The Making of Modern India and Pakistan  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Traces the history of India and Pakistan from the rise of British imperial power in the mid-eighteenth century to the present. Topics include the formation of a colonial economy and society; religious and social reform; the emergence of anti-colonial nationalism; the road to independence and partition; and issues of secularism, democracy, and inequality that have shaped post-colonial Indian and Pakistani society. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: South Asia and Colonial Worlds. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement of history majors and minors. (Same as: ASNS 2581)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

HIST 2343  (c, ESD, IP)   Media and Politics in Modern India  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the new forms of politics and of popular culture that have shaped modernity in India. Topics include the emergence of mass politics, urbanization, modern visual culture, new media technologies, and contemporary media and democracy. Course includes a film component. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: South Asia and Colonial Worlds. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: ASNS 2582)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2017.

HIST 2344  (c, ESD, IP)   A History of Human Rights  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Traces the emergence of ideas of universal humanity and human rights, as these took shape in the context of European imperial expansion from the sixteenth through the twentieth centuries. Uses case studies of Europeans and their interlocutors in Latin America, Asia, and Africa to explore the seeming contradiction and actual historical connections between empire and appeals to humanity, as well as the operation of transnational institutions like the United Nations since the mid-twentieth century. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Colonial Worlds. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: ASNS 2750)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2016.

HIST 2345  (c, ESD, IP)   The British Empire  

Every Other Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the history of the British Empire from its origins in the sixteenth century through its collapse in the mid-twentieth century, with a focus on the period after the American Revolutionary War. Explores the forces that drove colonial conquest, the shaping of colonial economies and societies, as well as the ideologies of race, gender, and sexuality that sustained colonial rule. Devotes considerable attention to the creative responses of colonized peoples to imperial rule, the rise of anti-colonial thought, the mobilization of popular anti-colonial movements, and histories of decolonization. Considers critical debates about the Empire's legacies, which continue to the present. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe, Colonial Worlds.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

HIST 2362  (c, ESD, IP)   Africa and the Atlantic World, 1400-1880  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

A survey of historical developments before conquest by European powers, with a focus on west and central Africa. Explores the political, social, and cultural changes that accompanied the intensification of Atlantic Ocean trade and revolves around a controversy in the study of Africa and the Atlantic World: What influence did Africans have on the making of the Atlantic World, and in what ways did Africans participate in the slave trade? How were African identities shaped by the Atlantic World and by the slave plantations of the Americas? Ends by considering the contradictory effects of Abolition on Africa. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Africa and Atlantic Worlds. It also fulfills the pre-modern and non Euro/US requirements for history majors and minors. (Same as: AFRS 2362)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2016.

HIST 2364  (c, ESD, IP)   Conquest, Colonialism, and Independence: Africa since 1880  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Focuses on conquest, colonialism, and its legacies in sub-Saharan Africa; the violent process of colonial pacification, examined from European and African perspectives; the different ways of consolidating colonial rule and African resistance to colonial rule, from Maji Maji to Mau Mau; and African nationalism and independence, as experienced by Africa’s nationalist leaders, from Kwame Nkrumah to Jomo Kenyatta, and their critics. Concludes with the limits of independence, mass disenchantment, the rise of the predatory post-colonial state, genocide in the Great Lakes, and the wars of Central Africa. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Africa and Colonial Worlds. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: AFRS 2364,AFRS 2364)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2016.

HIST 2365  (c, IP)   The Rise of Swahili Civilization  

David Gordon.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Considers the millennium-old interactions between peoples of Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia that created Swahili civilizations stretching from Mogadishu to Madagascar. Themes include the rise of dhow-based maritime trade; the spread of Islam; the slave trade and slavery; Omani, Portuguese, British, Italian, and German colonialisms; late colonial conflicts including the Mau Mau rebellion in Kenya and the revolution in Zanzibari. Ends with the rise of the post-colonial states of Tanzania, Kenya, Mozambique, Madagascar, and Somalia, and rebel insurgencies such as Somali pirates and Islamic fundamentalism. Note:This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Africa. This course meets the non-European/ US and pre-modern requirements for the History Major. (Same as: AFRS 2365)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

HIST 2380  (c, IP)   Christianity and Islam in West Africa  

Every Fall. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Explores how Christianity, Islam, and indigenous African religious beliefs shaped the formation of West African states from the nineteenth-century Islamic reformist movements and mission Christianity, to the formation of modern nation-states in the twentieth century. While the course provides a broad regional West African overview, careful attention is paid to how religious themes shaped the communities of the Nigerian region--a critical West African region where Christianity and Islam converged to transform a modern state and society. Drawing on primary and secondary historical texts as well as Africanist works in sociology and comparative politics, this Nigerian experience illuminates broader West African, African, and global perspectives that underscore the historical significance of religion in politics and society, especially in non-Western contexts. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Africa. (Same as: AFRS 2380)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

HIST 2381  (b, IP)   History of African and African Diaspora Thought  

Every Other Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Lecture course on seminal works in African and African diasporic thought since the decline of Atlantic slavery in the nineteenth century to the period of decolonization after the Second World War. Topics include anti-slavery movement, mission Christianity, Islamic reformism, Pan-Africanism, Negritude, colonialism, nationalism, neocolonialism, and black feminist thought. Lectures presented in the context of global and regional historical currents in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (Same as: AFRS 2841)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2016.

HIST 2401  (c, ESD, IP)   Colonial Latin America  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Introduces students to the history of Latin America from pre-Columbian times to 1825. Follows three interrelated stories: the establishment of colonial rule, including institutions of social control; the development of extractive economies dependent on unfree labor; and the evolution of a hybrid mestizo culture bringing together indigenous, European, and African traditions. Specific topics addressed include the nature of indigenous and Iberian society before contact; the creation of mestizo culture and the ambiguous role of the church in sustaining it; the evolving colonial economies and their reliance on exploitation of human and natural resources; and the evolving place of women, family, and kinship in colonial society. Considers the wars of independence in Spanish and Portuguese America, placing them in the context of broader Atlantic upheaval while highlighting the continuities between colonial and national periods. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America. It also meets the pre-modern and on euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: LAS 2401)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2016.

HIST 2402  (c, ESD, IP)   Modern Latin America: From Subjects to Citizens  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Introduces students to the history of Latin America from independence to the present. This course follows three interrelated stories: the struggle for citizenship by indigenous, formerly enslaved, and immigrant subjects; the development of export-oriented economies that concentrated land in the hand of a few elites; and the evolution of national (often popular) culture that brought together indigenous, European, and African traditions. Specific topics treated in this course include the wars of independence and their consequences; the creation of national identities built in opposition to the colonial heritage; the development of capitalist economies integrated with world markets; the evolving place of women and family in society; the rise and fall of populist movements, the role of institutions of social control in disciplining society; the preponderance of military regimes throughout the region; and the ambivalent role of international players in domestic affairs; as well as the emergence of discourses around human rights. (Same as: LAS 2402)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

HIST 2403  (c, ESD, IP)   Revolutions in Latin America: The People Take the Stage  

Javier Cikota.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Examines revolutionary change in Latin America from a historical perspective, concentrating on four successful social revolutions-- Haiti, Mexico, Cuba, and Bolivia-- as well as several revolutionary movements that did not result in social change-- including Argentina, Guatemala, Chile, Nicaragua, and Venezuela. Popular images and orthodox interpretations are challenged and new propositions about these processes are tested. External and internal dimensions of each of these social movements are analyzed and each revolution is discussed in the full context of the country’s historical development. This course fulfills the non-Euro/US requirement This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America. (Same as: LAS 2403)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

HIST 2404  (c, IP)   History of Mexico  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

A survey of Mexican history from pre-Columbian times to the present. Topics include the evolving character of indigenous societies, the nature of the Encounter, the colonial legacy, the chaotic nineteenth century, the Mexican Revolution, and United States-Mexican relations. Contemporary problems are also addressed. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America. (Same as: LAS 2104)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016.

HIST 2420  (c, ESD, IP)   Culture and Conquest in Japan: An Introductory History to 1800  

Every Year. Enrollment limit: 35.  

How did Japan become Japan? This course introduces the origins of Japan from the archeological record until industrial modernity. Lectures survey the unification of Japan under a court-centered state, the rise and demise of the samurai as its ruling order, and the archipelago's shifting relationship to the larger world. We will not only focus on the culture of conquest by the warrior class, but also conquest via culture as inhabitants of the archipelago transferred and transformed material commodities, knowledge systems, and sacred beliefs from beyond its horizons. Readings emphasize voices that comment on gender, status, religion, science, and nature. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It also meets the pre-modern and non euro/us requirements for history majors and minors. (Same as: ASNS 2252)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Fall 2015.

HIST 2421  (c, ESD, IP)   Modernity and Identity in Japan  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

In 1853, Commodore Matthew Perry sailed to Japan with four naval warships and issued an ultimatum: open up to trade or face foreign invasion. Charts Japan’s swift emergence from its feudal origins to become the world’s first non-Western, modern imperial power out of its feudal origins. Lectures introduce the origins, course, and consequences of building a modern state from the perspective of various actors that shaped its past: rebellious samurai, anarchist activists, the modern girl, imperial fascists, and office salarymen. Readings complicate dichotomies of East and West, modern and feudal, nation and empire through the lens of ethnicity, class, and gender. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the non euro/us requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: ASNS 2311)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016.

HIST 2503  (c, ESD)   Radically Conservative?: Unraveling the Politics of the American Revolution  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Different scholars have presented the American Revolution as either a radically egalitarian movement for universal human rights or as a fundamentally conservative rebellion led by elite men striving to protect their wealth and power from both the British Parliament and those occupying the lower rungs of American society. Unraveling the often-competing motives of Americans during the Revolution requires an understanding of the words and actions of Revolutionaries in light of their contemporary cultures and societies. Frequently this necessitates putting aside modern claims about what the Revolution means to better understand the interests and ideologies that underlay this foundational era of US history. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2016.

HIST 2504  (c)   Animals in American History  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Although modern humans tend to think of themselves as above nature, they are in fact part of it: partners in a myriad of relationships that have tied them to other members of the animal kingdom throughout their history. Examines a number of these relationships, focusing on North America from the sixteenth through the twentieth century. Topics considered include the role of animals in the development of the American economy, how domestic and wild animals have shaped the American environment, how Americans have conceived of the boundary between humanity and animality, and how pets have come to be viewed as part of the modern family. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: ENVS 2504)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2016.

HIST 2506  (c, ESD, IP)   The Vietnam Wars  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. The Vietnam War is among the most important events in postwar world history. Yet despite the enormous attention paid to the war in American popular culture, the history of the Vietnam War, which was in fact one of three interconnected wars, remains poorly understood. Explores the history of the Vietnam Wars by situating them in their broader historical context. Begins with French colonialism in the late nineteenth century and ends with the Third Indochina War in the very late 1970s. Along the way, investigates such themes as decolonization, nationalism, internationalism, the Cold War, nation building, counterinsurgency, antiwar activism, and human rights. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe; United States; Colonial Worlds.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

HIST 2520  (c)   The History of History  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

What is history and how do we come to know it? Does history follow a plan and, if so, what sort of plan? Examines theories of history from the ancient world until the present, including such figures as Augustine, Vico, Nietzsche, and Heidegger. Topics include theories of providence, secularization, and post-modernism. Some background in intellectual history, philosophy, or theory recommended. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe. It also meets the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

HIST 2523  (c)   The Renaissance  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Examines the culture, politics, religion, and art of both the Italian and Northern Renaissance, with an emphasis on close reading of original sources and recent scholarly work. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe. This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

HIST 2524  (c)   Everything is Wrong! The History of Doubt  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Examines the history of doubt, suspicion, and skepticism from the ancient world to the present as both a philosophical and cultural problem. Particular attention paid to moments of radical doubt among historians, scientists, politicians, and public groups. Readings include works by Rene Descartes, Sextus Empiricus, Charles Fort, Jean Hardouin, and Erich von Daniken. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe. It also fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016.

HIST 2527  (c)   Medieval and Reformation Intellectual History  

Dallas Denery.
Every Other Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Seminar. Examines important works in their intellectual and cultural context from the Middle Ages to Reformation, a period beginning with Augustine (354-430) and ending with the Council of Trent (1563). Potential topics include the relation between religion and philosophy, God and nature, and conceptions of the self. Potential readings include works by Augustine, Hildegard of Bingen, Thomas Aquinas, William Ockham, Christine de Pizan, Martin Luther, and John Calvin. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors.

HIST 2540  (c, ESD, IP)   Sex, Scandal, and Celebrity in Early Modern Europe  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Uses major scandals and cults of celebrity to illuminate the cultural history of early modern Europe. Questions include: What behaviors were acceptable in private but inexcusable in public? Why are people fascinated by scandals and celebrities, and how have those categories evolved over time? How have the politics of personal reputation changed with the rise of new media and new political cultures? Topics include gossip, urban spaces, gender, sex, crime, and religion. Uses a variety of materials, such as cartoons, newspaper articles, trial transcripts, memoirs, and novels, to explore the many meanings of scandal in early modern Europe, especially France and England. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe. It also fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: GSWS 2450)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

HIST 2541  (c, IP)   Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Europe  

Every Other Spring. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Crime provides a useful lens through which historians can understand the past because defining and punishing transgressions forced people to articulate their values and ideals. Considers criminal figures such as miscreant nuns, unfaithful wives, impostors, and murderers by examining celebrated court cases in Europe from 1500 to 1800. Students conduct independent research projects. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe. It fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016.

HIST 2543  (c)   History of the Body  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Examines changing conceptions of the body from the Middle Ages through the twentieth century, with a particular focus on the early modern period. Pays special attention to sex, gender, reproduction, and the body as an object of scientific study. Students will use print and visual sources to think about the body as socially and historically constructed, which will sharpen their historical thinking abilities and provide a solid foundation for other course offerings. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe. It also fulfills the premodern requirement for history majors.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

HIST 2580  (c, ESD, IP)   The German Experience, 1918-1945  

Page Herrlinger.
Every Other Year. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Seminar. An in-depth inquiry into the troubled course of German history during the Weimar and Nazi periods. Among the topics explored are the impact of the Great War on culture and society in the 1920s; the rise of National Socialism; the role of race, class, and gender in the transformation of everyday life under Hitler; forms of persecution, collaboration, and resistance during the third Reich; Nazi war aims and the experience of war on the front and at “home,” including the Holocaust. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015.

HIST 2586  (c)   A History of the Holocaust: Context, Experience, and Memory  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Explores the ideas and events that led to the Holocaust, the diverse experiences of the victims, European and Soviet responses to the Nazi persecution of the Jewish people, and issues related to the Holocaust and historical memory. In addition to secondary scholarship, discussions and papers will draw on a range of primary materials, including literature, memoirs, photography, art and film. Students will have the opportunity to do a short research project. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

HIST 2607  (c)   Maine: A Community and Environmental History  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Examines the evolution of various Maine social and ecological communities -- inland, hill country, and coastal. Begins with the contact of European and Native American cultures, examines the transfer of English and European agricultural traditions in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and explores the development of diverse geographic, economic, ethnic, and cultural communities during the nineteenth and into the early twentieth centuries. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: ENVS 2447)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2016.

HIST 2609  (c)   History of Women's Voices in America  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Examines women’s voices in America from 1650 to the twentieth century, as these emerged in private letters, journals, and autobiographies; poetry, short stories, and novels; essays, addresses, and prescriptive literature. Readings from the secondary literature provide a historical framework for examining women’s writings. Research projects focus on the form and content of women’s literature and the ways that it illuminates women’s understandings, reactions, and responses to their historical situation. Note:This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: GSWS 2601)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

HIST 2621  (b)   Reconstruction  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Close examination of the decade following the Civil War. Explores the events and scholarship of the Union attempt to create a biracial democracy in the South following the war, and the sources of its failure. Topics include wartime Reconstruction, the Ku Klux Klan, Republican politics, and Democratic Redemption. Special attention paid to the deeply conflicted ways historians have approached this period over the years. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: AFRS 2621)

Prerequisites: HIST 1000 - 2969 or HIST 3000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

HIST 2624  (c)   Historical Simulations  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Can board games teach history? Is it possible to analyze them as historical interpretations? What would such analyses reveal about both history and the way it is represented in popular culture? Which game mechanics or approaches to design seem to be better able to promote historical arguments? What factors may impede the representation of the past in games? Explores the past while addressing these questions. Examines six topics in history and plays one game related to them. Topics may include: the age of exploration and discovery, the American Revolution, the French Revolution, frontier exploration, slavery, and the American Civil War. Assignments consist of three structured game analyses, a final project, and participation in weekly evening game labs. Prospective students should be familiar with modern board games. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States.

Prerequisites: Two of: HIST 1000 or higher and HIST 1000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017.

HIST 2640  (c, ESD)   California Dreamin': A History of the Golden State  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Sunshine, beaches, shopping malls, and movie stars are the popular stereotypes of California, but social conflicts and environmental degradation have long tarnished the state’s golden image. Unravels the myth of the California dream by examining the state’s social and environmental history from the end of Mexican rule and the discovery of gold in 1848 to the early twenty-first century. Major topics include immigration and racial violence; radical and conservative politics; extractive and high-tech industries; environmental disasters; urban, suburban, and rural divides; and California in American popular culture. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: ENVS 2416)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

HIST 2641  (c, ESD)   Japanese American Incarceration: Removal, Redress, Remembrance  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Examines the mass imprisonment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Focuses on how historians have interpreted this episode and how Japanese Americans have remembered and reclaimed it. Topics include government justifications for incarceration, the operation of the camps, the diverse experiences of Japanese Americans, the postwar redress movement, and historical memory and commemorations. Also analyzes the political application of this history in discussions of contemporary immigration policy and social justice more broadly. Readings include secondary and primary sources, such as court cases, government documents, films, photography, art, oral histories, memoirs, and fiction. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: ASNS 2881)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

HIST 2660  (c, ESD)   The City as American History  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. America is an urban nation today, yet Americans have had deeply ambivalent feelings toward the city over time. Explores the historical origins of that ambivalence by tracing several overarching themes in American urban history from the seventeenth century to the present. Topics include race and class relations, labor, design and planning, gender and sexual identity, immigration, politics and policy, scientific and technological systems, violence and crime, religion and sectarian disputes, and environmental protection. Discussions revolve around these broad themes, as well as regional distinctions between American cities. Students are required to write several short papers and one longer paper based upon primary and secondary sources. Note:This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: GSWS 2266)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2016.

HIST 2680  (c)   Image, Myth, and Memory  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Which matters more: what happened, or what people think happened? Starts with the assumption that cultural reaction to an event is as consequential -- perhaps more so -- than what actually happened. Examines the cultural reception and changing historical memory of people, events, and ideas that have been central to modern American history and history of science. Seeks to answer questions about the nature and construction of public opinion, popular images, and historical memory -- and what the consequences of such processes and understandings have been. Introduces the themes and methods of studying popular and cultural history, drawing principally from examples in the history of science and post-World War II American culture. (Possible examples include nuclear weapons, evolution, genetics, climate change, student activism, feminism, abortion, education, and presidential politics.) Then follows a workshop format, in which classes revolve around the reading and writing that students do as part of self-designed research projects -- projects that may be on any subject in modern United States history. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States.

Prerequisites: HIST 1000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2016.

HIST 2690  (c, ESD, IP)   Fascism  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Although the term “fascism" appears everywhere today, it seems to have lost its specific meaning. In this course, we examine the history of fascism in Europe from the late 19th century to the present, exploring such questions as: Why did fascist movements first emerge? Is fascism a coherent ideology? How did fascists take power? How does fascism vary from country to country? Is fascist internationalism possible? And how have anti-fascists organized against fascism? While we focus on the years between two World Wars, the period of fascism’s height, we will pay special attention to how fascism not only survived, but successfully reinvented itself after 1945. The course ends by investigating the new wave of right-wing movements across Europe and the United States to determine whether they really constitute fascism. Note: this course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

HIST 2700  (c, ESD)   Martin, Malcolm and America  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Examines the lives and thoughts of Martin L. King Jr. and Malcolm X. Traces the development in their thinking and examines the similarities and differences between them. Evaluates their contribution to the African American freedom struggle, American society, and the world. Emphasizes very close reading of primary and secondary material, use of audio and videocassettes, lecture presentations, and class discussions. In addition to being an academic study of these two men’s political and religious commitment, also concerns how they inform our own political and social lives. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: AFRS 2700)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2017.

HIST 2780  (c, ESD, IP)   The Foundations of Chinese Thought  

Ya Zuo.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Seminar. Addresses Chinese thought from the time of Confucius, ca. sixth century B.C.E., up to the beginning of the Common Era. The first half of the time period nurtured many renowned thinkers who devoted themselves to the task of defining and disseminating ideas. The latter half witnessed the canonization of a number of significant traditions, including Confucianism. Major problems that preoccupied the thinkers include order and chaos, human nature, the relationship between man and nature, among others. Students instructed to treat philosophical ideas as historically conditioned constructs and to interrogate them in contexts. Note: This course is part of the following filed(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the pre-modern and non Euro/US requirements for history majors and minors. (Same as: ASNS 2002)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2017.

HIST 2781  (c, IP)   Science, Technology, and Society in China  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Examines Chinese science, technology, and medicine in the cultural, intellectual, and social circumstances. The first part surveys a selection of main fields of study in traditional Chinese science and technology, nodal points of invention and discovery, and important conceptual themes. The second part tackles the clash between traditional Chinese natural studies and modern science from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries. Prominent themes include astronomy and court politics, printing technology and books, and the dissemination of Western natural science, among others. Reading materials reflect an interdisciplinary approach and include secondary literature on cultural, intellectual history, ethnography, and the sociology of scientific knowledge. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: ASNS 2005)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

HIST 2801  (c, ESD, IP)   Sexual Politics in Modern India  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Explores the politics of sexuality in India from the colonial era to the present day. Topics include sexual violence; arranged marriage; courtesanship and sex work; sexuality and colonialism; sexuality and nationalism, and the emergence of a contemporary lesbian/gay/queer movement. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: South Asia and Colonial Worlds. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: ASNS 2573, GSWS 2259)

Prerequisites: HIST 1000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2016.

HIST 2802  (c, ESD, IP)   Global Cities, Global Slums of India  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. How have cities in the so-called "developing world" come to take their contemporary forms? How is life in these cities and slums lived? Explores these and other questions through a focus on modern India. Drawing on film, fiction, memoirs, urban planning, and other materials, examines the processes through which cities and slums have taken shape, ongoing efforts to transform them, as well as some of the diverse ways of representing and inhabiting modern urban life. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Colonial Worlds and South Asia. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: ASNS 2585)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2017.

HIST 2803  (c, ESD, IP)   A History of Human Rights  

Rachel Sturman.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Seminar. Traces the emergence of ideas of universal humanity and human rights, as these took shape in the context of European imperial expansion from the sixteenth through the twentieth centuries. Uses case studies of Europeans and their interlocutors in Latin America, Asia, and Africa to explore the seeming contradiction and actual historical connections between empire and appeals to humanity, as well as to consider the operation of transnational institutions like the United Nations since the mid-twentieth century. Students will engage in original research on a topic of their choice. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Colonial Worlds. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for History majors and minors. This course emphasizes the skills and approaches to writing in History

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

HIST 2821  (c, ESD, IP)   After Mandela: History, Memory, and Identity in Contemporary South Africa  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

How do South Africans remember their past? Begins with the difficulties in developing a conciliatory version of the past during Nelson Mandela’s presidency immediately after apartheid. Then explores the changing historiography and popular memory of diverse historical episodes, including European settlement, the Khoisan “Hottentot Venus” Sara Baartman, Shaka Zulu, the Great Trek, the Anglo-Boer War, the onset of apartheid, and resistance to it. Aims to understand the present-day social, economic, and cultural forces that shape the memories of South Africans and the academic historiography of South Africa. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Africa. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: AFRS 2821)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2016.

HIST 2822  (c, IP)   Warlords and Child Soldiers in African History  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Examines how gender, age, religion, and race have informed ideologies of violence by considering various historical incarnations of the African warrior across modern history, including the military slave, the mercenary, the revolutionary, the warlord, the religious warrior, and the child soldier. Analyzes the nature of warfare in modern African history and how fighters, followers, African civilians, and the international community have imagined the “work of war” in Africa. Readings include scholarly analyses of warfare, warriors, and warrior ideals alongside memoirs and fictional representations. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Africa. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: AFRS 2822)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2016.

HIST 2823  (c, IP)   Sacred Icons and Museum Pieces: The Powers of Central African Art  

David Gordon.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Seminar. The art of Central Africa inspired European avant-garde artists from Pablo Picasso to Paul Klee. This course explores art as a historical source. What does the production, use, commerce, and display of art reveal about politics, ideology, religion, and aesthetics? Prior to European colonialism, what was the relationship between art and politics in Central Africa? How did art represent power? What does it reveal about gender relations, social divisions, and cultural ideals? The course then turns to the Euro-American scramble for Central African art at the onset of European colonialism. How did the collection of art, its celebration by European artists, and display in European and American museums transform patterns of production, cultural functions and aesthetic styles of Central African art? The course ends with current debates over the repatriation of African art. Note:This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Africa. This course meets the non-European/ US History requirements. (Same as: AFRS 2823, ARTH 2390)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

HIST 2840  (c, IP)   African Migration and Globalization  

Every Fall. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Drawing on key readings on the historical sociology of transnationalism since World War II, examines how postcolonial African migrations transformed African states and their new transnational populations in Western countries. Discusses what concepts such as the nation state, communal identity, global relations, and security mean in the African context to critically explore complex African transnational experiences and globalization. These dynamic African transnational encounters encourage discussions on homeland and diaspora, tradition and modernity, gender and generation. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Africa, and Atlantic Worlds. (Same as: AFRS 2840)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015.

HIST 2860  (c, IP)   The United States and Latin America: Tempestuous Neighbors  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Examines scholarship on the evolution of United States-Latin American relations since Independence. Topics include the Monroe Doctrine, commercial relations, interventionism, Pan Americanism, immigration, and revolutionary movements during the Cold War. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: non-European/United States and United States. (Same as: LAS 2160)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016.

HIST 2861  (c, IP)   Contemporary Argentina  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Texts, novels, and films help unravel Argentine history and culture. Topics examined include the image of the gaucho and national identity; the impact of immigration; Peronism; the tango; the Dirty War; and the elusive struggle for democracy, development, and social justice. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America. (Same as: LAS 2161)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

HIST 2862  (c, IP)   The Haitian Revolution and its Legacy  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Examines one of the most neglected revolutions in history, and arguably, one of its most significant. The first half of the course treats the Revolution’s causes and tracks its evolution between 1791-1804. The second part studies its aftermath and its impact on Haiti, the Caribbean, Latin America, Europe, Africa, and the United States. Course requirements include four short papers on the readings and one substantive paper that assesses the scholarly literature on a topic of the student’s choosing. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America, Atlantic Worlds, and Colonial Worlds. (Same as: AFRS 2862, LAS 2162)

Prerequisites: HIST 1000 - 2969 or LAS 1000 - 2969.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

HIST 2870  (c, IP)   The Rise and Fall of New World Slavery  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. The form of slavery pioneered by Europeans who brought Africans to the New World occupies a unique place in the institution's long story. Examines the rise and demise of New World slavery: its founding, central practices, and long-term consequences. Just as New World slavery deserves to be considered a unique historical practice, so too do the impulses and transformations that led to its ending. Explores slavery as it rose and fell throughout the Atlantic basin, focusing particularly on Brazil, the Caribbean, and mainland North America. Investigates a range of issues: the emergence of market economies, definitions of race attendant to European commercial expansion, the cultures of Africans in the diaspora, slave control and resistance, free black people and the social structure of New World slave societies, and emancipation and its aftermath. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States; Atlantic Worlds, Colonial Worlds, and Latin America. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for History majors and minors. (Same as: AFRS 2870)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2015.

HIST 2883  (c, IP)   Violence, Memory, and Reconciliation in the Middle East  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Interrogates the social uses of the past in the Middle East. Focuses on instances of violence in the past (political, ethnic, and social) and how they have been covered by official narratives and by collective memory in society and through cultural forms. Then interrogates how these painful pasts have informed current debates over political transition in the Middle East. Relies on several cases studies that highlight the challenges of re-activating difficult pasts and the opportunities of addressing trauma with several opportunities for comparisons with other regions of the world. Note: This course fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for History majors and minors.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

HIST 2884  (c, ESD, IP)   Competing Israeli and Palestinian Nationalisms  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. The Arab-Israeli conflict has been a constant source of tension and war during the Middle East’s history. At the heart of the conflict lie the two competing nationalist claims of the Israelis and the Palestinians. The course explores how Israelis and Palestinians have constructed an image of their selves and the other throughout the different periods of their modern history, and their impact on political conflict and peace negotiations. The course will read these narratives from the late nineteenth century to the present. It will address significant episodes such as the British mandate in Palestine, the creation of Israel and the Palestinian nakba, Israel’s place in the region during pan-Arabism, the question of terrorism and resistance, the rise of religious nationalism, the intifada, and the attempted peace processes since Oslo. The course invites student to think “outside the box” about the role of memory and how conflicts affect individuals rather than states and political leaders. Note: This course fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for History majors and minors.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

HIST 2885  (c, IP)   Arab Thought: Ideas, Intellectuals, and Ideologies  

Idriss Jebari.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Seminar Introduces students to the ideas and intellectual projects of significant Arab thinkers, from the 19th century to the Arab Spring in 2011. This course will identify and discuss how they have addressed the Arabs’ concern for modernity and identity in the context of social, political and cultural transformation in the region. The course will cover several stages of Arab intellectual history starting with the liberal age, socialist and nationalist ideologies, pan-Arabism, third-world revolutionary ideologies, Islamic revival, and calls for democratization and human rights. It will also continuously ask about the conditions of thinkers, writers and dissidents in the Arab region, especially the impact of authoritarian regimes and the dangers posed by the rise of militant Islamism. This seminar will rely on a direct interaction with the primary texts. No prior knowledge Arab history is required, and all sources will be provided in translation. Note: This course fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors.

HIST 2890  (c, ESD, IP)   The Japanese Empire and World War II  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Charts the sudden rise and demise of the Japanese empire in the making of modern East Asia. Once stretching from the Mongolian steppe to the South Seas mandate, the Japanese empire continues to evoke controversy to this day. Discussions call attention to competing imperial visions, which challenged the coherence of the project as a whole. Primary sources introduce the lived experience of various individuals—emperors and coolies alike—who both conquered and capitulated to the imperial regime. Topics covered include settler colonialism, independence movements, transnational labor, fascist ideology, environmental warfare, the conundrum of collaboration, and war trials. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the non euro/us requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: ASNS 2310)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

HIST 2891  (c, IP)   East Asian Environmental History, 1600-2000  

Every Other Spring. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. The Anthropocene defines an epoch in which humans have become the dominant force in shaping their environment. Examines the role of East Asia in the emergence of this new era, from the seventeenth century to the present. In debating the narrative of ecological change in China, Japan, and Korea, readings and discussions focus on how successive regimes transformed their environments, and conversely, how those environments also structured modern human society. Questions what specific political, social, and economic changes triggered the Anthropocene in East Asia; how cultural, religious, and intellectual constructs have conditioned its arrival and acceleration. Weekly topics include: commodity frontiers, environmental sustainability, public health, industrial pollution, and nuclear technology. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the non euro/us requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: ASNS 2890, ENVS 2491)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016.

HIST 2892  (c, IP)   Maps, Territory, and Power  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Maps shape nearly every facet of our modern lives, from guiding us through unfamiliar streets on smart phones to legitimizing immigration restrictions in national policy. Explores the production, meanings, and implications of maps in charting the human relationship to the environment. Examines how modern cartography, from the Mercator projection to GPS, structures nature and society as much as it reflects “objective” representations of our surroundings. Readings emphasize how this technology has also sought to exert scientific hegemony over alternate conceptions of space in non-Western contexts. Sessions include analyzing original specimens in museum collections. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the non euro/us requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: ASNS 2892)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

HIST 2900  (c, ESD, IP)   Borderlands in the Americas: Power and Identity Between Empire and Nation  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 16.  

The study of borderlands examines areas of contested sovereignty where no single social group has political, cultural, or economic control. Explores interactions between native peoples, white settlers, and the representatives of the states in the Americas between the seventeenth and the nineteenth centuries. An examination of power and identity in borderlands considers a variety of regions in the hemisphere, from the Pacific Northwest to the Yucatan, from Texas to the Amazon. Pays special attention to how structures of race, class, and gender were established, maintained, and negotiated at times of uncertain change and in the absence of hegemonic state practice. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America. It fulfills the non euro/US requirements for history majors and minors. (Same as: LAS 2100)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

HIST 2910  (c, ESD, IP)   Race and Belonging in Latin America  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. This course is a study of race and ethnicity in Latin America, focusing on how Latin Americans themselves have understood and articulated these categories, as well as how scholars have interpreted their articulations. We will cover topics from African slavery to indigenous activism and mass immigration. Our focus will be on peoples of indigenous and African descent—the majority of Latin Americans—which will allow us to address questions of national identity, racial mixture, and cultural exchanges. We will trace themes familiar to students of the broader Atlantic world (themes such as race and nation, freedom and slavery, citizenship, and inequality) across the less-familiar setting of modern Brazil, Cuba, Guatemala, Mexico, Bolivia, Peru, and even Argentina. This course will tackle fundamental questions about the intersection of race, identity, and power in Latin America. Besides reading some of the classic analyses, we will look at some of the cutting-edge scholarship to assess how ideas of race and national belonging have changed through the centuries and across national contexts. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America. It fulfills the non-Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: LAS 2110)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

HIST 3060  (c)   Remembering the French Revolution  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Advanced research seminar. Explores the relationship between memory and social, cultural, and political history through a focus on the French Revolution. Considers how memories of the past and dreams for the future shaped the course of the French Revolution and the turbulent history of France in the nineteenth century. Students conduct independent research in this area, teach their research to the class, and write a substantial paper based on analysis of primary and secondary sources. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

HIST 3082  (c)   Only a Game? Sports and Leisure in Europe and America  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

This advanced seminar uses the lens of sport and leisure to analyze cultural and historical trends in modern Europe and the United States. Students read a range of primary and secondary texts exploring race, class, and gender and complete a significant research paper using primary sources and lead a class session. Offered concurrently with History 2560. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States and Europe.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

HIST 3100  (c)   Experiments in Totalitarianism: Nazi Germany and Stalinist Russia  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Compares and contrasts the nature of society and culture under two of the twentieth century’s most “totalitarian” regimes—fascism under the Nazis in Germany, and socialism under the Bolsheviks in the Soviet Union. Prior course work in either modern Germany or Russia is strongly recommended, and students may focus their research project on either country, or a comparison of both. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

HIST 3102  (c)   Stalinism  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Explores questions of power, identity, and belief in Soviet society under Joseph Stalin’s totalitarian system of rule from 1928 to 1953. Readings, drawn from recent scholarship and primary documents, engage topics such as Stalin’s dictatorship and cult of personality; the project to build socialism; mechanisms of state violence and political terror; popular conformity/resistance; gender, family, and everyday life; mass culture and socialist realism in the arts; Stalinism at war (1941-1945), in post-war Eastern Europe, and in historical memory. Students expected to write an original research paper. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2016.

HIST 3103  (c)   A History of the Holocaust: Context, Experience, and Memory  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Explores the ideas and events that led to the Holocaust, the diverse experiences of the victims, European and Soviet responses to the Nazi persecution of the Jewish people, and issues related to the Holocaust and historical memory. In addition to secondary scholarship, discussions and papers draw on a range of primary materials, including literature, memoirs, photography, art, and film. Students have the opportunity to conduct a short research project. Taught concurrently with History 2586. Students registering at the 3000 level expected to complete a more substantial primary research paper. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

HIST 3122  (c)   Community in America, Maine, and at Bowdoin  

Sarah McMahon.
Every Other Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

A research seminar that explores ideals and social, economic, political, and cultural realities of community in American history, and examines continuity, change, and socio-economic, racial, and ethnic diversity in community experience. Begins with studies of communities in seventeenth-century Massachusetts and early national upstate New York; then focuses on Maine and on Bowdoin College and its midcoast neighborhood, with readings in both the secondary literature and a wealth of primary sources. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

HIST 3141  (c)   History in the Archives  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

This upper level seminar challenges students to conduct original historical research relying on Bowdoin College’s extensive holdings in the George J. Mitchell Department of Special Collections & Archives. Working closely with the archives staff as well as the instructor, students learn the basics of archival research and embark on research projects founded on selected collections, which culminate in a paper of approximately twenty-five to thirty pages in length. Topics may include a range of subjects related to nineteenth-century American history, the Civil War era broadly construed, slavery and race, and Bowdoin College itself. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States.

Prerequisites: HIST 1000 - 2959 or HIST 3000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

HIST 3160  (c)   The United States Home Front in World War II  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines social and cultural changes on the United States home front during World War II. While some Americans remember World War II as the good war, an examination of this period reveals a more complicated history. By analyzing a variety of historical sources -- scholarly writings, government documents and propaganda, films, memoirs, fiction, and advertising -- investigates how the war shaped and reshaped sexuality, family dynamics, and gender roles; race and ethnic relations; labor conflicts; social reform, civil rights, and citizenship; and popular culture. Also considers the war’s impact on the immediate postwar years and how Americans have remembered the war. Students write a major paper based on primary source research. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

HIST 3180  (c)   The Nature of Health in the United States and the World  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Explores relationships between humans, environment, and health in the United States and North America in their global context from the sixteenth century to the present day. Overall focus is on how the history of health and the environment in the US connects to global and transnational history. Topics may include the evolution of public health interventions, biomedical research, and clinical practice; folk remedies and popular understandings of health; infectious and chronic diseases; links between landscape, health, and inequality; gender and reproductive health; occupational health and safety; the effects of agriculture, industrialization, and urbanization on human and ecological health; state and federal policies in the United States; and the colonial and transnational dimensions of public health and medicine. Students write a major research paper based on primary sources. Environmental Studies 1101, 2403, and at least one history course numbered 2000-2969 recommended. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: ENVS 3980)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2017.

HIST 3200  (c)   Imagining Disaster  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines how modern societies have confronted disaster. Drawing examples principally from the US context, we will study both natural disasters (such as the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake or Hurricane Katrina in 2005) and technological ones (the Chernobyl accident or the Challenger explosion.) How a society responds to disaster tells us much about its values, politics, and culture; such crises can also act as catalysts for social and historical change. During the first half of the course, we will study particular disasters and the scholarship surrounding them; other possible case studies involve extreme weather (the 1930s dust bowl), disease (1918 influenza pandemic), or environmental catastrophe (the Exxon Valdez spill). The second half of the course will ask students to design and write a significant research paper on a disaster of their choosing. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

HIST 3230  (c)   Research in Modern United States Metropolitan History  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Complete a semester-long research project in United States metropolitan history. During the first weeks, students learn about some major research methodologies historians use when researching and writing history of US metropolises. Addresses how historians use demography, spatial theory, and histories of LGBT communities; financial, political, and cultural institutions; electoral politics; public policies; popular culture; African Americans; immigrants; women; workers; and capitalists to uncover the ways cities and suburbs change over time. Students design a topic, research primary historical sources, locate a historical problem relating to the topic from secondary historical sources, and develop a hypothesis addressing the question. The result is a paper of at least twenty-five pages. Choose any feasible topic on the history of modern US cities and suburbs that takes place during the twentieth century. The coursework involved is advanced, but the greatest challenge is the need for self-direction. 3000-level research course fulfills the capstone requirement for Africana studies and history majors. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: AFRS 3230)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2016.

HIST 3321  (c, IP)   Neo-Confucianism  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines the so-called Neo-Confucian philosophy in historical contexts. The principle themes include ethics, cosmology, and epistemology. When most people think of Chinese philosophy, they think of philosophers from the classical period, e.g., Confucius. But these thinkers marked only the beginning of a rich and prolific philosophical tradition that continued for over two millennia. This class presents the central texts and themes of Neo-Confucianism and guides students to investigate them in the history of East Asia from 900 through early 1900s. The primary geographical focus is China, but we will also read works of important thinkers in Japan and Korea. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the pre-modern and non Euro/US requirements for history majors and minors. (Same as: ASNS 3010)

Prerequisites: ASNS 1000 - 2969 or ASNS 3000 or higher or HIST 1000 - 2969 or HIST 3000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

HIST 3385  (c)   Research in African and African Diaspora History  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

A research seminar focusing on major issues in African and African diaspora history, including: Africa and Atlantic slavery, colonialism in Africa, modern state formation in Africa, and Africa and globalization. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Africa and Colonial Worlds. (Same as: AFRS 3365)

Prerequisites: AFRS 1000 or higher or HIST 1000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

HIST 3403  (c)   The Cuban Revolution  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

The Cuban Revolution recently celebrated its fiftieth anniversary. Offers a retrospective of a Revolution entering “middle age” and its prospects for the future. Topics include United States-Cuban relations, economic and social justice versus political liberty, gender and race relations, and literature and film in a socialist society. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America. (Same as: LAS 3103)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015.

HIST 3420  (c)   Law and Justice in East Asia  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines how law and justice in East Asia became markers of modernity and sovereignty from the eighteenth to twentieth centuries.The kinds of punishment used in a society often act as a measure in judging whether that society is civilized or barbaric, advanced or backward. Major themes include: stereotypes of “oriental barbarism,” torture and capital punishment, village law and gender, extraterritoriality and imperialism, sentiment and mass media, war tribunals, and thought reform. Students analyze legal documents in translation alongside recent scholarship in the field and write a major paper based on primary source research. No prior knowledge of an Asian language necessary Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: East Asia. It fulfills the non euro/us requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: ASNS 3820)

Prerequisites: ASNS 2000 - 2969 or HIST 2000 - 2969.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.