Bowdoin College Catalogue and Academic Handbook

Gender Sexuality and Women St (GSWS)

GSWS 1005  (c)   Victorian Monstrosity  

Aviva Briefel.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2021. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Examines various monsters and creatures that emerge from the pages of Victorian narratives. What do these strange beings tell us about literary form, cultural fantasies, and anxieties; or about conceptions of selfhood and the body? How do they embody (or disembody) identities that subvert sexual, racial, and gendered norms? Authors may include Lewis Carroll, Richard Marsh, Robert Louis Stevenson, Bram Stoker, and H.G. Wells. (Same as: ENGL 1005,GOV 1005, AFRS 1005)

GSWS 1006  (b)   Queer and Trans Global Ethnography  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Draws from case studies around the world to understand the contemporary conditions under which queer and trans people live, identify themselves, make community (or not), and (sometimes) mobilize for change. We consider the distinct cultural dimensions of queer and trans life in different locations as well as global forces that make LGBTQ identity appear at times so uniform across different settings. Most readings are ethnographic reporting on queer or trans communities, and consider how gender and sexuality are conditioned by a variety of institutions (e.g. medicine, religion, activism). There are additional readings on theories of globalization and sexuality as well as occasional film viewings. Students will have weekly short writing prompts, culminating in a term paper that researches a particular queer or trans community outside of the U.S.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2020.

GSWS 1009  (c, FYS)   The Ravages of Love  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines examples of overwhelming love in eighteenth and nineteenth century novels from England, France, and Germany. Through close reading and intensive writing, considers the intersection of love with the difficulties created by class and gender difference; the power of desire to challenge social convention and the terms of ordinary reality; the confrontations between love, egotism, and seduction; and the implications of love’s attempt to dare all, even at the risk of death. Discusses the political overtones of these narratives of love and their place within the construction of gender, sexuality and subjectivity in Western culture. Authors may include Prevost, Goethe, Laclos, Hays, Austen, Bronte, and Flaubert. (Same as: ENGL 1009)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2017.

GSWS 1018  (c)   Jane Eyre, Everywhere  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Charlotte Brontë's 1847 novel, “Jane Eyre,” had a profound impact not only on subsequent nineteenth-century fiction, but also on twentieth- and twenty-first century literary representations of female experience. Begins with a close reading of Brontë's novel and then moves on to exploring modern literary rewritings of this narrative. Considers both how Brontë's themes are carried out through these various texts and why her narrative has been such a rich source of reinterpretation. In addition to Brontë, authors may include Du Maurier, James, Messud, Park, and Rhys. (Same as: ENGL 1018)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2020, Fall 2018.

GSWS 1021  (c, FYS)   Bad Girls of the 1950s  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Explores the representation and life experiences of women who did not fit the cultural norm of suburban motherhood in 1950s America. Focuses on issues of class, race, sexuality, and gender in a decade shaped by fears about nuclear war and communism, and by social and political conformity. Topics include teenage pregnancy, women’s grassroots political leadership, single womanhood, civil rights, emergent feminism, and, finally, the enduring cultural resonance of the apron-clad 1950s mom. Engages a variety of primary and secondary sources. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: AFRS 1021, HIST 1001)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2017.

GSWS 1025  (c)   Jane Austen  

Ann Kibbie.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2021. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

A study of Jane Austen’s major works, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Emma, Mansfield Park, and Persuasion. (Same as: ENGL 1012)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2019.

GSWS 1027  (c, FYS)   From Flowers of Evil to Pretty Woman: Prostitutes in Modern Western Culture  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Explores the myriad ways that prostitutes have been represented in modern Western culture from the middle of the nineteenth century to the present. By analyzing literary texts, visual artworks, and films from Europe and the United States, examines prostitution as a complex urban phenomenon and a vehicle through which artists and writers grapple with issues of labor, morality, sexuality, and gender roles. Introduces students to a variety of literary, artistic, musical, and filmic genres, as well as to different disciplinary approaches to the study of prostitution. Authors, artists, and film directors may include Baudelaire, Toulouse-Lautrec, Kirchner, Wedekind, Pabst, Marshall, Scorsese, Spielmann, and Sting. (Same as: GER 1027)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

GSWS 1032  (c)   Queering Video Games  

Angel Matos.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2021. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

How is queerness central to the creation, reception, and engagement with video games designed with different audiences in mind? How can video games push us to think more queerly about ourselves, other people, the world we live in, and the media we consume? This seminar explores the ideological tensions, issues, and concerns present in video games with LGBTQ+ themes and characters, and even more so, the value of approaching video games from a queer perspective even when they are void of overt LGBTQ+ content. Drawing from discourse in queer studies, gender studies, media studies, and game design, students will consider the value of using queer perspectives to rethink the practices of crafting, playing with, researching, and writing about video games. By crafting assignments such as close reading, theoretical application, and critical review essays, students will develop their academic writing skills while also learning how to engage in broader conversations about queerness, video game studies, and popular culture.

GSWS 1101  (b, DPI)   Introduction to Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies  

Jay Sosa.
Every Semester. Fall 2021. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Introduces key concepts, questions, and methods that have developed within the interdisciplinary fields of gender, sexuality, and women's studies. Explores how gender norms differ across cultures and change over time. Examines how gender and sexuality are inseparable from other forms of identification--race, class, ability, and nationality. And considers the role that gender, sexuality, and other identity knowledges play in resisting sexism, racism, homophobia, and transphobia.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2021, Fall 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017.

GSWS 1102  (c, VPA)   Cultural Choreographies: An Introduction to Dance  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 26.  

Dancing is a fundamental human activity, a mode of communication, and a basic force in social life. Investigates dance and movement in the studio and classroom as aesthetic and cultural phenomena. Explores how dance and movement activities reveal information about cultural norms and values and affect perspectives in our own and other societies. Using ethnographic methods, focuses on how dancing maintains and creates conceptions of one’s own body, gender relationships, and personal and community identities. Experiments with dance and movement forms from different cultures and epochs -- for example, the hula, New England contradance, classical Indian dance, Balkan kolos, ballet, contact improvisation, and African American dance forms from swing to hip-hop -- through readings, performances, workshops in the studio, and field work. (Same as: DANC 1102)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

GSWS 1104  (c)   Introduction to Black Women's Literature  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 50.  

Examines the twin themes of love and sex as they relate to poems, stories, novels, and plays written by African American women from the nineteenth century to the contemporary era. Explores such issues as Reconstruction, the Great Migration, motherhood, sexism, group loyalty, racial authenticity, intra- and interracial desire, homosexuality, the intertextual unfolding of a literary tradition of black female writing, and how these writings relate to canonical African American male-authored texts and European American literary traditions. Students are expected to read texts closely, critically, and appreciatively. Possible authors: Harriet Jacobs, Frances Harper, Nella Larsen, Jessie Faucet, Ann Petry, Ntozake Shange, Suzan-Lori Parks, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Gayle Jones, Jamaica Kincaid, Terry McMillan, Sapphire, Lizzette Carter. (Same as: ENGL 1108, AFRS 1108)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

GSWS 1205  (c)   Black Women's Lives as the History of Africana Studies: Twentieth and Twenty-first Century  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 50.  

In conjunction with the fiftieth anniversary of Africana studies at Bowdoin, this course will address debates and issues of Africana studies through the lives of black women. Students will focus on the twentieth and twenty-first centuries reading works by and about Zora Neale Hurston, Pauli Murray, Nina Simone, Josephine Baker, Angela Davis, and Condoleezza Rice. We will take up differences and continuities between these thinkers to understand the politics of respectability, work, representation, sexuality, and family across multiple historical contexts. Though this course continues the themes of AFRS 1109, students need not take Part I to take Part II. (Same as: AFRS 1111, ENGL 1302)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2020.

GSWS 1301  (c)   Black Women's Lives as the History of Africana Studies: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 50.  

In conjunction with the fiftieth anniversary of Africana studies at Bowdoin, this yearlong, two-part course will address debates and issues of Africana studies through the lives of black women. In Part I, students will focus on early Africana studies texts, reading works by and about Phillis Wheatley, Sojourner Truth, Frances Harper, Ida B. Wells, and Anna Julia Cooper. We will take up differences and continuities between these thinkers to understand the politics of respectability, work, representation, sexuality, and family across multiple historical contexts. (Same as: AFRS 1109, ENGL 1301)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2019.

GSWS 1321  (c)   Philosophical Issues of Gender and Race  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 50.  

Explores contemporary issues of gender and race. Possible topics include the social construction of race and gender, implicit bias, racial profiling, pornography, the gender wage gap, affirmative action, race and incarceration, transgender issues, and reparations for past harms. Readings drawn from philosophy, legal studies, and the social sciences. (Same as: PHIL 1321)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

GSWS 1592  (c, VPA)   Issues in Hip-Hop I  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 50.  

Traces the history of hip-hop culture (with a focus on rap music) from its beginnings in the Caribbean to its transformation into a global phenomenon by the early 1990s. Explores constructions of race, gender, class, and sexuality in hip-hop’s production, promotion, and consumption, as well as the ways in which changing media technology and corporate consolidation influenced the music. Artists/bands investigated include Grandmaster Flash, Run-D.M.C., Public Enemy, De La Soul, Queen Latifah, N.W.A., MC Lyte, Snoop Doggy Dogg, and Dr. Dre. (Same as: MUS 1292, AFRS 1592)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

GSWS 2001  (DPI)   Queer Theory  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Queer theory began as an activist intellectual movement in the 1990s that examined the lives, art, and politics of non-heterosexual and non-gender conforming persons. With promiscuous origins in psychoanalysis, literary criticism, political philosophy, feminist inquiry and urban sociology, queer theorists used multiple methodologies to imagine alternative practices of community, desire, intimacy, and gender expression. Studies the questions that arise from the experiences of people whose bodies don't fit social norms (gay, lesbian, trans, various abled, polluted, racially stigmatized bodies). Potential topics include: how we communicate our sex lives or gender identity through the use of "public secrets”; the codes of romantic melodrama that frame contemporary dilemmas of civic life; and how activists have mourned slow catastrophes (e.g., AIDS, but also ecocide and colonialism). (Same as: ENGL 2905)

Prerequisites: GSWS 1000 - 2969 or GSWS 3000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2021, Spring 2020, Spring 2019, Spring 2018.

GSWS 2021  (c)   Embodying the Renaissance  

Aaron Kitch.
Every Other Year. Fall 2021. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

The English Renaissance (c. 1500-1650) defined the human body in new ways as a source of knowledge, pleasure, and representation, even as the body remained subject to surveillance, punishment, and torture. This course explores a range of different bodies in prose, drama, and poetry through the critical lenses of race and gender as well as in relation to scientific, religious, and medical knowledge and practices. Topics include anatomical dissection, the humoral body, the cult of virginity, marking the body (i.e., tattoos), and contrasting theories of sexual reproduction. We also attend to newly racialized bodies produced by the nascent slave trade and new efforts of colonial expansion. This writing-intensive intermediate seminar culminates in a self-designed research project on a topic designed by students and informed by additional research. Primary authors include William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, Aemilia Lanyer, Katharine Philips, John Donne, and Margaret Cavendish. Note: Fulfills the pre-1800 requirement for English majors. (Same as: ENGL 2024)

GSWS 2076  (c, IP)   Fashion and Gender in China  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines how the dress women wear and the fashion consumers pursuit reflect social-cultural identities and generate gender politics. Readings and discussions span historical periods, geographical locations, social-cultural groups, and identity categories. From bound feet to the Mao suit, and from qipao to wedding gowns, fashion styles and consumer trends inform a critical understanding of the nation, gender, body, class, and transnational flows. Topics include the intersections between foot-binding and femininity, qipao and the modern woman, the Mao suit and the invisible body, beauty and sexuality, oriental chic and re-oriental spectacle. With visual materials as primary source, and fashion theory the secondary, offers an opportunity to gain knowledge of visual literacy and to enhance analytical skills. (Same as: ASNS 2076)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2020, Fall 2017.

GSWS 2109  (c)   Medieval Women Writers  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 35.  

This course introduces students to the writings of medieval women, cis and trans—queens and princesses, heretics and saints, scientists and philosophers—who lived in the four centuries between the years 1000 and 1400 CE. We will read their autobiographies, manifestos, secret letters, visions of paradise, love poems, and fairy tales. Although this course focuses on women who wrote in the English language, it also explores the wider world in which these women lived and traveled, from Paris to Timbuktu and Shiraz to Iceland. We will put the medieval texts we read into conversation with the work of contemporary women writers like Michaela Coel, Sally Rooney, and Jia Tolentino. Note: This class fulfills the pre-1800 requirement for the English major. (Same as: ENGL 2109)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2021.

GSWS 2110  (c)   “Bad” Women Make Great History: Modern Europe as Lived and Shaped by Women, 1789–1968  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

An examination of modern European history centered on women’s voices, experiences, perspectives, subjectivity, and agency. Drawing largely on primary sources (including memoirs, letters, art, literature, photography, and film), lectures and discussions will explore how women from across Europe navigated and challenged the gendered norms of their societies to shape unique and diverse identities; examine and acknowledge women’s accomplishments in different spheres of society and culture; and consider the major debates, obstacles, and achievements related to women’s political, economic, and cultural liberation. Lectures will also emphasize ways in which a gendered lens enhances our understanding of European history, including the experience of industrialization, secularization, imperialism, socialism, fascism, and the two world wars. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe. (Same as: HIST 2110)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2020.

GSWS 2111  (b)   Viral Cultures: HIV/AIDS in Science, Policy, and Culture  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

In the thirty-plus years since its emergence, HIV/AIDS has dramatically altered the world’s social, political, economic, scientific, and cultural landscape. From the early 1980s through the present, people living with HIV and AIDS, activists, artists, policymakers, and researchers have sought to understand the ways that HIV/AIDS is transforming how we live and die, how we think and create, and what we value. Brings students together to work across disciplines to address the complexities of HIV/AIDS on global, national, local, and individual scales. Students examine various aspects of the HIV/AIDS pandemic: activism, epidemiology, cultural history, medical treatment; the business, economics, and industry of disease, HIV and global health, law and public policy; and representations of HIV/AIDS in literature, archives, media, and the arts. Throughout, the intersections of HIV/AIDS with sexuality, gender, race, ability, culture, religion, nation, poverty, and other factors that crucially shape the lives and life chances of those living with HIV/AIDS are addressed. Critically engaging diverse materials and topics illuminates how contemporary societies have and continue to witness, frame, and make meaning of the ongoing HIV/AIDS pandemic.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

GSWS 2201  (b, DPI)   Feminist Theory  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

The history of women’s studies and its transformation into gender studies and feminist theory has always included a tension between creating “woman,” and political and theoretical challenges to that unity. Examines that tension in two dimensions: the development of critical perspectives on gender and power relations both within existing fields of knowledge, and within the continuous evolution of feminist discourse itself.

Prerequisites: GSWS 1000 - 2969 or GSWS 3000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2020, Fall 2019, Fall 2018, Fall 2017.

GSWS 2202  (c)   Renaissance Sexualities  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

How do Renaissance authors represent sexual desires and dilemmas? What strategies do authors use to represent, for instance, drives that have not been codified and labeled according to modern epistemologies? Topics include the inarticulacy of homoeroticism and other forms of attachment as they shape Shakespearean comedy, minor epic, and tragicomic romance, with special attention to the poetics of same-sex desire and the erotics of theatrical performance by boy actors on the London stage. Authors include Shakespeare, Thomas Middleton, John Ford, Thomas Crashaw, and Margaret Cavendish, with secondary readings by Eve Sedgwick, Jonathan Goldberg, and Laurie Shannon, among others. Note: Fulfills the pre-1800 requirement for English majors. (Same as: ENGL 2202)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2020.

GSWS 2206  (c, DPI, IP)   Latin American Feminisms  

Irina Popescu.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2021. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

What are feminisms? Is there more than one feminism? What is the relationship between feminisms and constructions of race, gender and ethnicity in Latin America? How has feminist discourse shaped human rights discourses in the region? This course explores the complex network of feminisms in 20th-21st century Latin America. It covers feminist movements, theories, and scholars/artists from a variety of Latin American countries and regions, including Guatemala, Argentina, Mexico, and Brazil. Students will learn how intersections between constructions of race and ethnicity, as well as gender, impact feminisms in the region. Students will also explore how early and more recent contributions of indigenous and women of color, continue impacting ideas, discussions, and recent debates concerning feminisms and women's social mobilizations in Latin America. Note: This course fulfills the GSWS requirement for either Queer Theory or Feminist Theory. (Same as: LACL 2374)

Prerequisites: GSWS 1000 - 2969 or GSWS 3000 or higher.

GSWS 2207  (c, VPA)   Black Women, Politics, Music, and the Divine  

Judith Casselberry.
Every Fall. Fall 2021. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Seminar. Examines the convergence of politics and spirituality in the musical work of contemporary black women singer-songwriters in the United States. Analyzes material that interrogates and articulates the intersections of gender, race, class, and sexuality generated across a range of religious and spiritual terrains with African diasporic/black Atlantic spiritual moorings, including Christianity, Islam, and Yoruba. Focuses on material that reveals a womanist (black feminist) perspective by considering the ways resistant identities shape and are shaped by artistic production. Employs an interdisciplinary approach by incorporating ethnomusicology, anthropology, literature, history, and performance and social theory. Explores the work of Shirley Caesar, the Clark Sisters, Meshell Ndegeocello, Abby Lincoln, Sweet Honey in the Rock, and Dianne Reeves, among others. (Same as: AFRS 2201, MUS 2291, REL 2201)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

GSWS 2209  (c)   Gender and Islam  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Explores categories for interpreting female symbolism in Islamic thought and practice, and women’s religious, legal, and political status in Islam. Attention is given to statements about women in the Qur’an, as well as other traditional and current Islamic texts. Emphasis on analysis of gender in public versus private spheres, individual vs. society, Islamization vs. modernization/Westernization, and the placement/displacement of women in the traditionally male-dominated Islamic power structures. Students may find it helpful to have taken Religion 2208 (Islam), but it is not a prerequisite. (Same as: REL 2209)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2020.

GSWS 2212  (b)   Sociology of Sexuality  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the theoretical and methodological approaches used in the sociological study of sex and sexuality. Explores how people construct meanings around sex, how people use and question notions of sexuality, and why sexuality is socially and politically regulated. Links sexuality to broader sociological questions pertaining to culture and morality, social interaction, social and economic stratification, social movements, urbanization and community, science, health, and public policy. Topics also include the historical and legal construction of heterosexuality, sexual fluidity, gay identity, masculinities and femininities, the queer dilemma, and the “post-gay” phenomenon. (Same as: SOC 2212)

Prerequisites: SOC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2020.

GSWS 2217  (c, IP)   Fallen Women and Superfluous Men: Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and the Great Russian Novel  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Introduces students to two giants of Russian literature, Tolstoy and Dostoevsky, and explores their significance to Russian cultural history and European thought. The course surveys the aesthetic contributions, literary styles, and artistic innovation of both authors through the close reading of their early and mature works. Themes of religion, philosophy, modernity, and art are examined through the complex lens of gender dynamics in nineteenth-century Russian literature. Special emphasis is placed on each novelist’s approach to questions of gender roles, masculinity, femininity, sexuality, prostitution, motherhood, free will, and social and familial duty. Sexual violence, suffering, spirituality, and redemption are further topics of interest. Studied texts include Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment and Notes from Underground, as well as Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina, The Cossacks, and “The Kreutzer Sonata,” among others. Class is conducted in English. . (Same as: RUS 2117)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2021.

GSWS 2219  (b, DPI)   Deconstructing Masculinities  

Theo Greene.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2021. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

An introduction to the sociological study of men and masculinities. Investigates debates about the historical, structural, cultural, and personal meanings constructed around masculinity. Explores how masculinity varies historically and across the life span; how it intersects with race, class, gender, sexuality, age, and ability; and how these constructions map onto male and female bodies. Examines how masculinities construct and reproduce power and inequality among men and between men and women. Topics also include, but are not limited to, the production and maintenance of masculinity, the male body, masculine cultures of sports, technology, violence and incarceration, female and queer masculinities. (Same as: SOC 2219)

Prerequisites: SOC 1101 or GSWS 1101 or GWS 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2021, Fall 2017.

GSWS 2224  (b)   Introduction to Human Population  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Focuses on the processes of population change—fertility/reproduction, mortality/death, and migration—with attention to the causes of and consequences of those changes. Also examines the politics around population change, discourse, and policies, and the ways those have been connected to global inequality, gender inequalities, and race and ethnicity. (Same as: SOC 2222, ENVS 2332)

Prerequisites: SOC 1101 or GSWS 1000 - 2969 or GSWS 3000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2020.

GSWS 2230  (c, DPI)   Queer Youth Cultures: Texts and Contexts  

Angel Matos.
Every Other Year. Fall 2021. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

How can queer frameworks push us to develop more complex understandings of young people and their roles in culture and society? How do children’s picture books, young adult novels, youth television, and video games reinforce or disrupt normative understandings of youth, sexuality, queerness, and growth? Explores the connections between queer and critical youth studies and applies them toward the examination of youth literature and media with LGBTQ+ characters and themes. Examines how queer youths are imagined and constructed in different texts and media, and how are these texts can reconfigure—and potentially challenge—simplistic understandings of children, teens, and their cultures. Through critical, intersectional engagement with fictional works crafted for younger audiences and scholarship in queer youth studies, students will challenge ideas used to conceptualize Western understandings of childhood and adolescence, such as innocence, knowledge, growth, and experience.

GSWS 2231  (c)   Gender and Sexuality in Early Christianity  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Investigates the ways in which gender and sexuality can serve as interpretive lenses for the study of early Christian history, ideas, and practices. Can the history of early Christianity--from the apostle Paul to Augustine of Hippo--be rewritten as a history of gender and sexuality? In answer to that question, addresses a range of topics, including prophecy, sainthood, militarism, mysticism, asceticism, and martyrdom. In addition, by oscillating between close readings and contemporary scholarship about gender, feminism, masculinity, sexuality, and the body, looks beyond the world of antiquity. Aims to show how theories of and about sexuality and gender can fundamentally reorient understandings of Christian history. (Same as: REL 2235)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2020.

GSWS 2236  (c, IP)   Gods, Goblins, and Godzilla: The Fantastic and Demonic in Japanese Literature and Film  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

From possessing spirits and serpentine creatures to hungry ghosts and spectral visions, Japanese literary history is alive with supernatural beings. Our study will range from the earliest times to modernity, examining these motifs in both historical and theoretical contexts. The readings will pose the following broad questions: How do representations of the supernatural function differently in myths of the ancient past and narratives of the modern nation? Are monstrous figures cast as miscreants, or do these transgressive figures challenge societal orthodoxy? How do Buddhist ideas influence the construction of demonic female sexuality in medieval Japan, and how is this motif redrawn in modern Japan? How are sociopolitical anxieties articulated in horror films like Godzilla? This course will draw on various genres of representation, from legends and novels to art and cinema. Students will gain an understanding of the cultural history of the monstrous in Japan and develop a broad appreciation of the hold that these creatures from the “other” side maintain over our cultural and social imagination. (Same as: ASNS 2270)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2020.

GSWS 2237  (b, IP)   Family, Gender,and Sexuality in Latin America  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Focuses on family, gender, and sexuality as windows onto political, economic, social, and cultural issues in Latin America. Topics include indigenous and natural gender ideologies, marriage, race, and class; machismo and masculinity; state and domestic violence; religion and reproductive control; compulsory heterosexuality; AIDS; and cross-cultural conceptions of homosexuality. Takes a comparative perspective and draws on a wide array of sources including ethnography, film, fiction, and historical narrative. (Same as: ANTH 2737, LACL 2737)

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101 or SOC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2017.

GSWS 2242  (c)   Radicals, Feminists, Poets, Monsters, circa 1800  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the rise of and reactions to radical literature in the wake of the French Revolution. Focuses on such topics as extravagant lyricism, anarchism, non-violent revolution, and the critique of marriage, family, male privilege, and patriarchal religious belief, as well as the defense of tradition and the depiction of revolution as monstrosity. Discusses radical rewritings of classical myth, the uses of fiction for political critique, and the intersections between sharp historical change and the emergence of the Gothic. Authors may include Burke, Blake, Wollstonecraft, Godwin, Percy Shelley, and Mary Shelley. (Same as: ENGL 2350)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2020, Fall 2018.

GSWS 2246  (b, IP)   Hierarchies of Care: From Kinship to Global Citizenship  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Care shapes the relationships of children, adults, and elders within families, but care also extends far beyond the boundaries of households, incorporating domestic workers, volunteers, medical professionals, missionaries, humanitarian organizations, and governments. This course explores recent scholarship on care as a form of intimate labor and an array of social practices that are embedded in local cultural contexts and shaped by global political economic relationships. Gender, race and ethnicity, class, nationality, and age shape the configurations of caring by and caring for others. Incorporates attention to feminist, decolonial, and poststructuralist theories of power as operating on bodies and intimate relationships. Course texts include ethnographies, scholarly articles, and other materials. Draws on a wide array of contemporary contexts around the world for ethnographic case studies. (Same as: ANTH 2246)

Prerequisites: ANTH 1000 - 2969 or ANTH 3000 or higher or SOC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2020, Spring 2019.

GSWS 2247  (c)   Modernism/Modernity  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the cruxes of the “modern,” and the term’s shift into a conceptual category rather than a temporal designation. Although not confined to a particular national or generic rubric, takes British and transatlantic works as a focus and includes fiction, poetry and visual art. Organized by movements or critical formations of the modern, i.e., modernisms, psychoanalysis, postmodernism, cultural critique, transnationalism. Readings of critical literature in conjunction with primary texts. Authors/directors/artists may include T. S. Eliot, James Joyce, Langston Hughes, Virginia Woolf, Katherine Mansfield, Zadie Smith, J. M. Coetzee, Roberto Bolaño, Man Ray, Stanley Kubrick. (Same as: ENGL 2451)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2020, Fall 2018.

GSWS 2248  (c)   Family and Community in American History, 1600–1900  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the social, economic, and cultural history of American families —across socio-economic classes, and among multiple racial, ethnic, and cultural groups—from 1600 to 1900, and the continuities, changes, and variations in the relationships between families and their kinship networks, communities, and the larger society. Topics include gender relationships; racial, ethnic, cultural, and class variations in family and community ideals, structures, and functions; the purpose and expectations of marriage; philosophies of child-rearing; organization of work and leisure time; and the effects of slavery and racial discrimination, industrialization, urbanization, immigration, and social and geographic mobility on patterns of family life and community organization. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: HIST 2128)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2020.

GSWS 2249  (c, IP)   Rebels, Workers, Mothers, Dreamers: Women in Russian Art and Literature since the Age of Revolution  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Although the Russian cultural tradition has long been male-dominated, this paradigm began to shift with the advent of brilliant women writers and artists prior to the Russian Revolution. Since the collapse of the USSR, women have again emerged as leaders in the tumultuous post-Soviet cultural scene, even overshadowing their male counterparts. Explores the work of female Russian writers, artists, and filmmakers against a backdrop of revolutionary change, from the turn of the twentieth century to the present. Themes include representations of masculinity and femininity in extremis; artistic responses to social, political, and moral questions; and women’s artistry as cultural subversion. (Same as: RUS 2245)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

GSWS 2251  (c)   Women in American History, 1600-1900  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 35.  

A social history of American women from the colonial period through the nineteenth century. Examines women’s changing roles in both public and private spheres; the circumstances of women’s lives as these were shaped by class, ethnic, and racial differences; the recurring conflict between the ideals of womanhood and the realities of women’s experience; and focuses on family responsibilities, paid and unpaid work, religion, education, reform, women’s rights, and feminism. Note:This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: HIST 2126)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2021, Spring 2019.

GSWS 2252  (c)   Christian Sexual Ethics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

An examination of the historical development, denominational variety (e.g. Catholic, Evangelical, Mormon), and contemporary relevance of Christian teachings and practices regarding sex and sexuality. The course is designed to acquaint students with the centrality of sex to Christian notions of sin and virtue as well as with the broader cultural impact of Christian sexual ethics on the understanding and regulation of gender, the rise of secularization and “family values,” and public policy regarding marriage, contraception, reproductive technologies, sex work, and welfare. In addition, students will have opportunities to construct and test moral frameworks that address sexual intimacy and assault, the stigmatization of bodies (with regard to race, class, size, sexuality and disability), and the commoditization of sex and persons. Materials are drawn from the Bible, Church dogmatics, legal cases, contemporary ethicists and documentary film. (Same as: REL 2257)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

GSWS 2256  (c)   Gender, Body, and Religion  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

A significant portion of religious texts and practices is devoted to the disciplining and gendering of bodies. Examines these disciplines including ascetic practices, dietary restrictions, sexual and purity regulations, and boundary maintenance between human and divine, public and private, and clergy and lay. Topics include desire and hunger, abortion, women-led religious movements, the power of submission, and the related intersections of race and class. Materials are drawn from Christianity, Judaism, Neopaganism, Voudou, and Buddhism. (Same as: REL 2253)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

GSWS 2257  (c)   White Negroes  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Intermediate seminar. Close readings of literary and filmic texts that interrogate widespread beliefs in the fixity of racial categories and the broad assumptions these beliefs often engender. Investigates “whiteness” and “blackness” as unstable and fractured ideological constructs. These are constructs that, while socially and historically produced, are no less “real” in their tangible effects, whether internal or external. Includes works by Charles Chesnutt, Nella Larsen, Norman Mailer, Jack Kerouac, John Howard Griffin, Andrea Lee, Sandra Bernhard, and Warren Beatty. (Same as: ENGL 2004, AFRS 2654)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

GSWS 2258  (c, VPA)   Women, Gender, And Sexuality in Western European and American Art, 1500 to Present  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

This course will provide an introduction to the history of women as creators, subjects, and audiences of art in Western Europe and the United States from the Renaissance to the present. How do we (can we?) tell the stories of the forgotten people and identities of the past? What archives and artifacts are available, and how do we account for the gaps? How do we think historically about the variable categories of gender and sexuality? As we grapple with these questions, we will explore a wide range of methods and approaches to visual art that focus on questions of gender and sexuality in an intersectional context, and identify key concepts such as “bodies,” “ideologies,” and “identities.” No previous work in art history required. (Same as: ARTH 2560,GER 2251)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2020, Fall 2018.

GSWS 2260  (c)   African American Fiction: (Re) Writing Black Masculinities  

Guy Mark Foster.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2021. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

In 1845, Frederick Douglass told his white readers: “You have seen how a man was made a slave; you shall see how a slave was made a man.” This simple statement effectively describes the enduring paradox of African American male identity: although black and white males share a genital sameness, until the nation elected its first African American president the former has inhabited a culturally subjugated gender identity in a society premised on both white supremacy and patriarchy. But Douglass’s statement also suggests that black maleness is a discursive construction, i.e. that it changes over time. If this is so, how does it change? What are the modes of its production and how have black men over time operated as agents in reshaping their own masculinities? Reading a range of literary and cultural texts, both past and present, students examine the myriad ramifications of, and creative responses to, this ongoing challenge. Beginning with the Class of 2025, this class will fulfill the African American, Asian American, Indigenous, Latinx, multiethnic American, or global literature requirement for English majors. (Same as: ENGL 2650, AFRS 2650)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

GSWS 2261  (c)   Gender, Film, and Consumer Culture  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

How do we spend money, and why? Examines the relationship between gender and consumer culture over the course of the twentieth century. Explores women’s and men’s relationships to consumer culture in a variety of contexts: the heterosexual household, the bachelor pad, the gay-friendly urban cafeteria, the advertising agency, and the department store. Also explores the ways in which Hollywood films, from the 1930s to the present, have both furthered and complicated gendered notions about the consumption of goods. (Same as: CINE 2261)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2020.

GSWS 2266  (c)   The City as American History  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. America is an urban nation today, yet Americans have had deeply ambivalent feelings toward the city over time. Explores the historical origins of that ambivalence by tracing several overarching themes in American urban history from the seventeenth century to the present. Topics include race and class relations, labor, design and planning, gender and sexual identity, immigration, politics and policy, scientific and technological systems, violence and crime, religion and sectarian disputes, and environmental protection. Discussions revolve around these broad themes, as well as regional distinctions between American cities. Students are required to write several short papers and one longer paper based upon primary and secondary sources. Note:This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: HIST 2660, URBS 2660)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

GSWS 2268  (b, IP)   Saved By the Girl? Politics of Girlhood in International Development  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 35.  

In recent decades, girls’ education and empowerment has emerged as a key site for investment and advocacy. Girls are often represented as having the potential to solve wide-ranging societal issues, from poverty to terrorism. Interrogates the current focus on girls in international development by examining its cultural politics. What kinds of knowledges about people in the global south are produced in/through girl-focused campaigns? What is highlighted and what is erased? What are the consequences of such representations? Examinations lead to an exploration of the different theories of ‘girl,’ ‘culture,’ ‘empowerment,’ ‘rights,’ and ‘citizenship’ that are operative in this discourse. Situates girl-focused campaigns within the broader politics of humanitarianism and asks critical questions about conceptualizations of ‘freedom’ and the constitution of the ‘human’. To provide a more nuanced understanding of the lives of girls in the global south, brings to bear ethnographic studies from Pakistan, Egypt, India, and Nepal. (Same as: ASNS 2610)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

GSWS 2270  (c)   Spirit Come Down: Religion, Race, and Gender in America  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines the ways religion, race, and gender shape people’s lives from the nineteenth century into contemporary times in America, with particular focus on black communities. Explores issues of self-representation, memory, material culture, embodiment, and civic and political engagement through autobiographical, historical, literary, anthropological, cinematic, and musical texts. (Same as: AFRS 2271, REL 2271)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2021.

GSWS 2271  (b, IP)   The World’s Most Dangerous Place?: Gender, Islam, and Politics in Contemporary Pakistan  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 35.  

The January 2008 cover image of The Economist calls Pakistan “The world’s most dangerous place.” Indeed, Pakistan has been variously called a “terrorist state,” a “failed state,” and a “lawless frontier.” This course engages in an academic study of the gender, religion, and politics in Pakistan to deepen students’ understanding of the world’s sixth-most populous country. We begin with accounts of the British colonization of South Asia and the nationalist movements that led to the creation of Pakistan. We then consider the myriad issues the nation has faced since 1947, focusing in particular on the debates surrounding gender and Islam, and Pakistan’s entanglements with the US through the Cold War and the War on Terror. In addition to historical and ethnographic accounts, the course will center a number of primary texts (with English translations) including political autobiographies, novels, and terrorist propaganda materials. Students will write a research paper as the final product. (Same as: ASNS 2611)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2019.

GSWS 2273  (c)   The Woman's Film  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Concentrating in large part on the classical Hollywood period, we will explore films that center on women's experiences and that are (or seem to be) intended for a female audience. We will examine the genres of melodrama, film noir, gothic, and comedy in relation to the performance of female identity; representations of gender, class, race, and sexuality; and theories of spectatorial identification. The last part of the class will consider ways in which contemporary women’s films draw on and reconfigure the themes brought up by earlier narratives. Directors might include Arzner, Cukor, Haynes, Hitchcock, Mankiewicz, Varda, and Vidor. (Same as: CINE 2270)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2021, Spring 2019.

GSWS 2282  (c)   Gender, Sexuality, and Schooling  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Schools are sites where young people learn to do gender and sexuality through direct instruction, the hidden curriculum, and peer-to-peer learning. In schools, gender and sexuality are challenged, constrained, constructed, normalized, and performed. Explores instructional and curricular reforms that have attempted to address students and teachers sexual identities and behavior. Examines the effects of gender and sexual identity on students’ experience of school, their academic achievement, and the work of teaching. Topics may include compulsory heterosexuality in the curriculum, the gender of the good student and good teacher, sex ed in an age of abstinence. (Same as: EDUC 2212)

Prerequisites: EDUC 1101 or GLS 2001 or GWS 1101 or GSWS 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

GSWS 2283  (c)   Interracial Narratives  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Violence and interracial sex have long been conjoined in U.S. literary, televisual, and filmic work. The enduring nature of this conjoining suggests there is some symbolic logic at work in these narratives, such that black/white intimacy functions as a figural stand-in for negative (and sometimes positive) commentary on black/white social conflict. When this happens, what becomes of “sex” as a historically changing phenomenon when it is yoked to the historically unchanging phenomenon of the “interracial”? Although counter-narratives have recently emerged to compete with such symbolic portrayals, i.e. romance novels, popular films and television shows, not all of these works have displaced this earlier figural logic; in some cases, this logic has merely been updated. Explores the broader cultural implications of both types of narratives. Possible authors/texts: Richard Wright, Chester Himes, Ann Petry, Lillian Smith, Jack Kerouac, Frantz Fanon, Kara Walker, Amiri Baraka, Alice Walker, Octavia Butler, John R. Gordon, Kim McLarin, Monster’s Ball, Far From Heaven, and Sex and the City. (Same as: ENGL 2653, AFRS 2653)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2019.

GSWS 2292  (c, IP)   Goddesses, Gurus, and Rulers: Gender and Power in Indian Religions  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Provides a historical perspective on how gender and power have intertwined in the diverse religious traditions of India. Explores ideas about femininities, masculinities, and genderqueer identities in religious texts and premodern religious communities, analyzing the influence of monastic ideals, economic patronage, and gendered notions of divine authority. Readings examine mythology, rituals, and ideas about gender and social power in Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, and Muslim traditions; including gender roles in family and culture; transgender identity and religion; and, in the latter part of the course, the impacts of colonialism, nationalist politics, and migration on gender and religion. (Same as: REL 2280, ASNS 2740)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2020, Spring 2019.

GSWS 2294  (c)   Issues in Hip-Hop II  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Traces the history of hip-hop culture (with a focus on rap music) from the 1990s to the present day. Explores how ideas of race, gender, class, and sexuality are constructed and maintained in hip-hop’s production, promotion, and consumption, and how these constructions have changed and/or coalesced over time. Investigates hip-hop as a global phenomenon and the strategies and practices of hip-hop artists outside of the United States. Artists investigated range from Iggy Azalea to Jay-Z, Miz Korona to Ibn Thabit. (Same as: MUS 2294, AFRS 2294)

Prerequisites: MUS 1292 (same as AFRS 1592 and GWS 1592).

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

GSWS 2315  (c, IP)   Love, Sex, and Desire in Russian Literature and Culture  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Russian culture is rich with depictions of the fundamental human experiences of love, sex, and desire. And while these depictions have often been subject to various forms of censorship, they have just as often served as expressions of dissent against rigid social, political, and artistic norms. This course explores the ideological and aesthetic significance of such themes as romance, lust, yearning, sexual violence, adultery, prostitution, religious passion, poetic inspiration, unrequited love, celibacy, gender identity, sexuality, masturbation, pornography, body image, sexual frustration, castration, and witchcraft in Russian literature and the arts from medieval times to the present day. Not only do the works studied inscribe “difference” on the bodies of their subjects, but Russia also functions as a social “other” against which students examine their own cultural assumptions. Authors may include Avvakum, Bulgakov, Chekhov, Dostoevsky, Gogol, Nabokov, Pushkin, Tolstoy, Tsvetaeva, Turgenev, and Zamyatin. Taught in English. (Same as: RUS 2315)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2019.

GSWS 2320  (c, VPA)   Gender and Sexuality in Teen Cinema  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

How does the figure of the teen mobilize different ideologies of gender, sexuality, and queerness in various genres of film? How do contemporary sociocultural circumstances affect the creation, reception, and interpretation of teen films produced throughout the decades? In this course, students will examine how different films frame, approach, and at times misrepresent adolescent experience. Students will explore how understandings of adolescence, gender, and sexuality have shifted over the decades, how teen sexuality is visually aestheticized, and how representations of gender and teen sexuality are inflected by other domains of identity such as race and class. In addition to learning how to “close read” these films, taking notions such as editing, sound, form, and style into consideration, students will explore and apply queer and feminist frameworks to unlock innovative and politically viable ways of critiquing these so-called “vapid” and “uncritical” cultural productions. (Same as: CINE 2141)

Prerequisites: GSWS 1000 - 2969 or GSWS 3000 or higher or CINE 1000 - 2969 or CINE 3000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2020.

GSWS 2345  (b, IP)   Race, Gender, and Intimacy in Brazil  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

This course examines how hierarchies of race, class, gender, and sexuality structure everyday life in Latin America's largest nation, Brazil. Twentieth century elites described Brazil as a racial democracy and a sexual paradise, but this vision is increasingly contested in the twenty-first century by Black, feminist, and LGBT social movements. Reading ethnographic accounts and watching film portrayals of daily life in Brazil across a number of case studies, we will examine how Brazilians encounter social inequality in a variety of intimate settings. Potential topics include: domestic labor, sex work, queer activism, plastic surgery and reproductive rights. Students will complete short response papers during the semester and complete a final research project on a self-selected topic that includes primary or secondary sources on Brazil. (Same as: ANTH 2345, LACL 2345)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2017.

GSWS 2380  (b, IP)   Gender in the Middle East  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Explores the contemporary debates on the construction and organization of gender and sexuality in the Middle East. Provides a critical lens on the colonial and orientalist legacies that mediate the dominant representations and discourses on the region. Questions the normative assumptions behind “modernity,” “religion,” and “tradition” by covering a variety of issues including veiling, honor killings, female circumcision, and military masculinities. Examines the emergence of new femininities, masculinities, sexual identifications, and feminist and queer struggles in the Middle East. (Same as: SOC 2380)

Prerequisites: SOC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

GSWS 2410  (c, VPA)   Post-Soviet Russian Cinema  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Newly freed from censorship, Russian filmmakers in the quarter-century between 1990 and 2015 created compelling portraits of a society in transition. Their films reassess traumatic periods in Soviet history; grapple with formerly taboo social problems such as alcoholism, anti-Semitism, and sexual violence; explore the breakdown of the Soviet system; and critique the darker aspects of today’s Russia, often through the lens of gender or sexuality—specifically addressing subjects such as machismo, absent fathers, rape, cross-dressing, and birthing. Central are the rapid evolution of post-Soviet Russian society, the emergence of new types of social differences and disparities and the reinvention of old ones, and the changing nature of social roles within the post-Soviet social fabric. Taught in English. (Same as: RUS 2410, CINE 2602)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

GSWS 2426  (c)   The Horror Film in Context  

Aviva Briefel.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2021. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Examines the genre of the horror film in a range of cultural, theoretical, and literary contexts. Considers the ways in which horror films represent violence, fear, and paranoia; their creation of identity categories; their intersection with contemporary politics; and their participation in such major literary and cinematic genres as the gothic, comedy, and family drama. Texts may include works by Craven, Cronenberg, De Palma, Freud, Hitchcock, Kristeva, Kubrick, Poe, Romero, and Shelley. Note: Fulfills the film theory requirement for Cinema Studies minors. (Same as: ENGL 2426, CINE 2426)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2017.

GSWS 2430  (c, IP)   Gendering Latin American History  

Every Other Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

An introduction to Latin American history between 1400 and the present, using the lens of gender to reinterpret the region's history. Some key events include the arrival of Europeans, mestizaje, honor and race, independence, civil wars, liberalism, populism, dictatorship, and issues of memory and redemocratization. This course works on two registers. The first is that of “women’s history.” Here, we will survey the experiences and impact of women in Latin America from the pre-conquest period to the present, through the lenses of cultural, social, and political history. In other words, we will tell the stories of Latin American women and investigate how changes small and large affected their everyday lives. The second register is “gender history.” In other words, we will not just discuss women’s experiences, but also the ways that gender ideologies have influenced Latin American history. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America. It fulfills the non euro/us requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 2430, LACL 2420)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2020.

GSWS 2450  (c, IP)   Sex, Scandal, and Celebrity in Early Modern Europe  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Uses major scandals and cults of celebrity to illuminate the cultural history of early modern Europe. Questions include: What behaviors were acceptable in private but inexcusable in public? Why are people fascinated by scandals and celebrities, and how have those categories evolved over time? How have the politics of personal reputation changed with the rise of new media and new political cultures? Topics include gossip, urban spaces, gender, sex, crime, and religion. Uses a variety of materials, such as cartoons, newspaper articles, trial transcripts, memoirs, and novels, to explore the many meanings of scandal in early modern Europe, especially France and England. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Europe. It also fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 2540)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2021, Fall 2020.

GSWS 2453  (c)   "A Kind of Scar": The Irish Story in Poetry and Prose  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Eavan Boland, one of Ireland’s great modern poets, died very suddenly on April 27, 2020. She taught at Bowdoin in the spring of 1988, and she received an honorary degree from Bowdoin in 2004. The course she taught was The Poetry of W. B. Yeats. She had a transformative impact on Irish writing, as feminist, as critic, as poet. In this iteration of the course, we will consider the storied ideas about Ireland through the lens of Boland’s vision of Irish history and writing. The course will focus on poetry, though not exclusively, and on Boland’s poetics, her influences, her icons, her re-creations of Irish history and outside history (“the Troubles,” the Celtic Tiger, immigration). Boland’s reach is global, and we will look at her Irish ancestors and contemporaries, such W. B. Yeats, Seamus Heaney, and Paula Meehan; her idols, including Emily Dickinson, Adrienne Rich, Sylvia Plath, Robert Hayden, Louise Glück (Nobel Prize for literature, 2020), Carol Ann Duffy (Poet Laureate of UK 2009–2019), Russian poet Anna Akhmatova, German-Jewish poet Nelly Sachs, and Iranian poet and film director Forough Farrokhzad (Same as: ENGL 2453)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2021.

GSWS 2505  (c, VPA)   Geographies of the Sexiness: Dance and Politics of (Dis)Respectability Across the Americas  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Dance—an art form whose medium is the body—and ethnography—the study of people and their cultures—are great tools for addressing some of the ways different dancing bodies have been historically policed for “dancing sex(y).” Other tools, such as critical dance and black theories, in addition to queer and feminist approaches, will also be utilized to comprehend the uneven ways these bodies are further racialized, sexualized, and gendered within the Americas. In particular, students will learn about various dances (such as the Brazilian samba to the Cuban rumba, Jamaican Dancehall, and the Trinidadian wine) through readings, lectures, and actual in-studio dancing. Ultimately, the intention here is to understand dancing as both a meaning-making activity and a way of understanding the world. In turn, it is an important lens for critically thinking, talking, researching, and writing about politics of identity (especially regarding nationality, gender, race, and sexuality). (Same as: DANC 2505, AFRS 2292, LACL 2392)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2021, Spring 2019.

GSWS 2548  (c)   American Wilderness  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Examines changing American attitudes towards the environment through the specific lens of wilderness literature from first encounters with the American wilderness by European colonialists to the current period, which some scientists call the sixth mass extinction. Topics include the mastery of nature; myths of natural plenitude and natural scarcity; the relationship of wilderness to nature and civilization; race, gender, and wilderness; and the end of nature. Devotes attention to queer, feminist, and of color interventions, from the outright rejection of wilderness to the cultivation of alternative wilderness traditions such as feminist/queer pastoral and African American georgic. Texts may include literary works by Mary Rowlandson, Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Frederick Douglass, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Jean Toomer, Gary Snyder, and Octavia Butler, as well as visual/multimedia works by Jacob Riis, Ang Lee, Werner Herzog, and Maya Lin. (Same as: ENGL 2548, ENVS 2548)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2020.

GSWS 2554  (c)   Classic Twentieth-Century LGBT Cultural Texts  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Analyzes some of the most enduring, and in some cases infamous, lesbigay and transgendered cultural texts of the twentieth century. Whether authored by avowed LGBT authors of by non-LGBT cultural producers, such works reflect some of the specific challenges that U.S. and European writers and others have continued to face in depicting portrayals of same-sex identities and desires that seek to reject totalizing narratives of pathology and criminalization. Possible texts include: The Well of Loneliness, Death in Venice, Giovanni's Room, The Boys in the Band, The Front Runner, Stone Butch Blues, Hitchcock's Rope, The Children's Hour, Will and Grace, and Six Feet Under. (Same as: ENGL 2554)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2020.

GSWS 2601  (c)   History of Women's Voices in America and at Bowdoin  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Examines women’s voices in America from 1650 to the early twenty-first century, as these were written and saved in private letters, journals, and autobiographies; poetry, short stories, and novels; essays, addresses, prescriptive literature, and journalism. In celebration of 50 years of Women at Bowdoin, the course will culminate with an examination of women’s voices at Bowdoin, using the "Forty Years: The History of Women at Bowdoin" website as both a source and a guide to further readings. Articles and monographs from the secondary literature provide a historical framework for examining women’s writings. Research projects focus on the form and content of women’s writing and the ways that these accounts illuminate women’s understandings, reactions, and responses to their historical situation. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States. (Same as: HIST 2609)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2020.

GSWS 2602  (c)   Science and Art of the Sex Photograph  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Intermediate seminar. Explores the way in which late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century scientific uses of the photograph (e.g., by scientism, eugenics) to configure sexuality and gender were adjusted by modern visual arts and literary photographs. We will consider a variety of early scientific studies, contemporary theories of sexuality and biopolitics (Foucault), and of photography (Benjamin, Barthes, Sontag ); photographs by Man Ray, Claude Cahun, Gordon Parks (with Ralph Ellison), Catherine Opie; film by Michelangelo Antonioni (“Blow-up”); prose works by Virginia Woolf, W.G. Sebald, Claudia Rankine. (Same as: ENGL 2011)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2020.

GSWS 2610  (b)   Sex and State Power  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Examines sexual politics of the law, policing, public health, and state surveillance and explores feminist and queer responses to the relationship between sex and power from a variety of disciplines and traditions. Focuses on two major trends in the regulation of sex in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries: (1) how policy making has shifted from defining sexual morality to managing populations, and (2) the reinvigorated politics of the family as governments scale back their social welfare programs. Additional topics may include reproductive rights, sex work, marriage, hate crimes, surveillance, militarism, and prisons. Students learn main trends in the politics of sexuality and conduct a research project on the topic of their choice. (Same as: ANTH 2610)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

GSWS 2651  (c)   Queer Race  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

How does the concept of queerness signify in cultural texts that are ostensibly about the struggle for racial equality? And vice versa, how does the concept of racialization signify in cultural texts that are ostensibly about the struggle for LGBT recognition and justice? While some of this work tends to reduce queer to traditional sexual minorities like lesbigay and trans folk while downplaying racial considerations, others tend to limit the category race to people of color like blacks while downplaying questions about sexuality. Such critical and creative gestures often place queer and race in opposition rather than as intersecting phenomena. Students examine the theoretical and cultural assumptions of such gestures, and their implications, through close readings of selected works in both the LGBT and African American literary traditions. (Same as: ENGL 2651, AFRS 2651)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

GSWS 2660  (c)   Romantic Sexualities  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Intermediate seminar. Investigates constructions of sexuality in English romantic writing, especially tales of seduction by supernatural or demonic figures; the sexualized world of the Gothic; the Byronic hero; lyrical depictions of incest; the yearning for an eroticized muse or goddess; and same-sex desire in travel writing, diaries, and realist fiction. Discusses the place of such writing in the history of normative and non-normative sexual identities, repression, the unconscious, and the sublime. Authors may include Burke, Lewis, Mary Shelley, Byron, Wollstonecraft, Lister, Austen, Coleridge, and Keats, with further readings in queer theory and the history of sexuality. (Same as: ENGL 2014)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2021, Spring 2019.

GSWS 2701  (b, DPI)   Muslim Women: Contemporary Challenges and Activism  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Explores contemporary debates on gender and sexuality in Islam. Begins with an examination of gender and sexuality in the Quran to understand how these ideas have been taken up in the past and present to produce and maintain gender hierarchies. At the same time, it also centers contemporary challenges posed to these hierarchies. To do so, we pay particular attention to Muslim women’s activism by centering ethnographic studies from Muslim-majority as well as diasporic contexts. A major thrust of the course is studying the lifeworlds of Shia Muslim women (a minority interpretive community within Islam). Seminar-style course.

Prerequisites: GSWS 1000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2020, Spring 2020.

GSWS 2705  (c, DPI, IP)   Activism and Human Rights in Latin America  

Irina Popescu.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2021. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

What is the relationship between activism and human rights in Latin America? How have the battling constructions of race, gender, and ethnicity sparked social justice movements in the region? This course offers a general introduction to the development of contemporary discourses and activism on human rights in Latin America. It covers activist and justice movements in a variety of Latin American countries and regions including Brazil, Guatemala, the Southern Cone, and Mexico. Students will analyze how cultural production, in the form of film, literature, testimony, and art, by Afro-Latinx and indigenous subjects, women, and members of the LQBTQI+ community led to the “making,” of human rights in the region. As an IRBW course, students in this course will also develop and practice their critical writing and research skills throughout the semester with plenty of research development writing workshops, one-on-one writing mentoring, and feedback. (Same as: LACL 2375)

GSWS 2710  (b, IP)   The World’s Most Dangerous Place?: Gender, Islam, and Politics in Contemporary Pakistan  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

This course engages in an academic study of the gender, religion, and politics in Pakistan to deepen students’ understanding of the world’s sixth-most populous country. We begin with accounts of the British colonization of South Asia and the nationalist movements that led to the creation of Pakistan. We then consider the myriad issues the nation has faced since 1947, focusing in particular on the debates surrounding sovereignty, gender and Islam. In addition to historical and ethnographic accounts, the course will center a number of primary texts (with English translations) including political autobiographies, novels, and terrorist propaganda materials. (Same as: ASNS 2611)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2021.

GSWS 2715  (b, DPI, IP)   Sex Wars in the Americas  

Jay Sosa.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2021. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

What motivates political battles over sexuality and gender? Often described as disputes over culture, morality, family, or lifestyle, these struggles more often have to do with concerns over national belonging, distributions of care labor, and enforcement of race, class, and gender norms. In this course, we first learn about feminist and queer frameworks for studying gender and sexuality politics: culture wars, backlashes, and moral panics. We draw on case studies that outline the histories of anti-reproductive and anti-LGBT movements in Brazil and in the United States. And we will consider the social dynamics of recent “anti-gender” movements in Latin America. Over the semester, students will research a particular case study of a culture war, backlash, or moral panic, where they use journalist and NGO reporting, and write a term paper that applies the frameworks learned in class. (Same as: LACL 2347)

Prerequisites: GSWS 1101 or ANTH 1101 or SOC 1101.

GSWS 2720  (c, VPA)   Between the Alamo and the Wall: Latinx Activism in the United States  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

This course explores the range of issues inspiring Latinx activism and its diverse expressions across the United States from the turn of the 20th century to the present. It introduces students to the intellectual traditions and analytical approaches that inform both Latinx and Afro-Latinx activism in the US During the course of the semester students will ‘travel’ to U.S. cities (and regions) such as San Antonio and the Texas Borderlands, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Chicago, and the Central Valley in California. As we ‘travel’ to these locations, we will explore diverse expressions of Latinx activism, including labor activism, cultural activism, political activism surrounding citizenship rights, and the struggles for gender and sexuality rights. Students will also learn about the many similarities and differences among Latinx communities in the United States, including Afo-Latinx communities, specifically Afro-Cuban in Miami, and Afro-Puerto Ricans and Afro-Domincans in New York. We will explore how these communities have used and continue to use activist practices ranging from labor strikes to literary texts, to gain visibility and negotiate their rights within the country. This course will also draw connections between Latinx and Afro-Latinx and other activist movements in the US, from civil rights to labor rights and the formation of worker’s unions. Drawing from various disciplines including history, law, literature, sociology, and cultural studies, students will explore how Latinx activism has shaped understandings of race and inclusion, gender, sexuality, and citizenship in the United States. (Same as: LAS 2421, AFRS 2721)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2020.

GSWS 2745  (c, IP)   The Tigress' Snare: Gender, Yoga, and Monasticism in South and Southeast Asia  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

There is no dearth of stories regarding the dangers of women and sexuality for Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, and Nath yogis and ascetics. Texts after texts written on ancient, classical, and early modern Asian monasticism point to the evil of women and the dangers they pose to those attempting to live monastic lives. Women, however, have historically been and continue to be involved in these religious traditions. This class will examine the highly gendered worldview found within South and Southeast Asian yogic and monastic texts. Primarily reading Hindu, Nath yogi, Jain, and Buddhist canonical teachings, the class will discuss the manner in which women have historically been viewed within these religious traditions. It will then shift to look at the manner in which women have been and continue to take part in these communities in their everyday life. Through the use of both academic readings and multimedia texts, the class will examine how women navigate their roles within these male-dominated communities, their reasons for joining these communities, and the differences that exist for women within the different monastic and yogic communities. (Same as: ASNS 2745, REL 2745)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2020, Spring 2019.

GSWS 3020  (c)   African Women as Peacemakers  

Donato Fhunsu.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2021. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Advanced seminar on African women’s studies and peace studies. Given their various stakes, women in African societies have always been peacemakers. In exploring these stakes, this seminar focuses on the lives and writings of six African women intellectuals (Yvonne Vera, Bessie Head, Mariama Bâ, Wangari Maathai, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, and Leymah Gbowee), three of whom have won the Nobel Peace Prize. Students will investigate how these women and the stories they tell reconceptualize feminism and peaceful interactions among themselves and others (women, men, and the environment) in order to bring about individual transformation. By perceptively reading challenging texts, engaging in probing class discussions, keeping a weekly written “Peace Journal,” and working collaboratively on a final group research with oral presentation, students will gain experiential insight into ideals and realities of the African women to reimagine feminism, peace, and relationships amid violence. (Same as: AFRS 3210)

GSWS 3103  (c)   Gender, Sexuality, and Popular Music  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 15.  

Employs gender as a theoretical tool to investigate the production, consumption, and representation of popular music in the United States and around the world. Examines how gender and racial codes have been used historically, for example to describe music as “authentic” (rap, rock) or “commercial” (pop, new wave), and at how these codes may have traveled, changed, or re-appeared in new guises over the decades. Considers how gender and sexuality are inscribed at every level of popular music as well as how music-makers and consumers have manipulated these representations to transgress normative codes and open up new spaces in popular culture for a range of sexual and gender expressions. Juniors and seniors only; sophomores admitted with consent of the instructor during the add/drop period. (Same as: MUS 3103)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

GSWS 3211  (c)   Bringing the Female Maroon to Memory: Female Marronage and Douboutism in French Caribbean Literature  

Hanétha Vété-Congolo.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2021. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

History has retained the names of great male Caribbean heroes and freedom fighters during slavery such as the Haitians, Mackandal or Toussaint Louverture, the Jamaican, Cudjoe or the Cuban Coba. Enslaved Africans who rebelled against oppression and fled from the plantation system are called maroons and their act, marronage. Except for Queen Nanny of the Jamaican Blue Mountains, only male names have been consecrated as maroons. Yet, enslaved women did fight against slavery and practice marronage. Caribbean writers have made a point of bringing to memory forgotten acts of marronage by women during slavery or shortly thereafter. Proposes to examine the fictional treatment French-speaking Caribbean authors grant to African or Afro-descent women who historically rebelled against slavery and colonization. Literary works studied against the backdrop of douboutism, a conceptual framework derived from the common perception about women in the French Caribbeanwhich means strong woman. Authors studied may include Suzanne Dracius (Martinique), Fabienne Kanor (Martinique), André Schwart-Bart (Guadeloupe), Maryse Condé (Guadeloupe), Evelyn Trouillot (Haiti). Conducted in French. (Same as: FRS 3211, AFRS 3211, LACL 3211)

Prerequisites: Two of: either FRS 2409 (same as AFRS 2409 and LAS 2209) or FRS 2410 (same as AFRS 2412 and LAS 2210) or FRS 3000 or higher and either FRS 2409 (same as AFRS 2409 and LAS 2209) or FRS 2410 (same as AFRS 2412 and LAS 2210) or FRS 3000 or higher.

GSWS 3226  (c)    A Body “Of One’s Own”: Caribbean and Latinx Women Writers  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

What kind of stories do bodies tell or conceal? How does living in a gendered and racialized body effects the stories told by women? How do bodies and their stories converge with History or complicate historical “truths”? These are some of the questions addressed in this study of contemporary writing by women from the Hispanic Caribbean and the United States Latinx/Chicana communities. Feminists of color frame the analysis of literature, popular culture and film to guide an examination of the relation of bodies and sexuality to social power, and the role of this relation in the shaping of both personal and national identities. Theorists include Alexander, Barriteau, Curiel, Mendez and Segato. Novelists include Álvarez, Buitrago, García, Indiana Hernández, and Santos-Febres. Taught in Spanish with readings in Spanish and English. (Same as: HISP 3226, AFRS 3226, LACL 3226)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2020, Fall 2017.

GSWS 3231  (c, IP)   Sor Juana and María de Zayas: Early Modern Feminisms  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Did feminism exist in the early modern period? Examines key women authors from the early Hispanic World, considering the representation of gender, sexuality, race, and identity in distinct political and social contexts. Focuses on Mexican author Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (1651-1695) and Spanish author María de Zayas (1590-1661), alongside other prominent women writers from the period. Students read short stories, essays, poems, and personal letters. Conducted in Spanish. (Same as: HISP 3231, LACL 3231)

Prerequisites: HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410).

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

GSWS 3301  (b)   Doing Gender Studies: Intimacy and Consumer Objects  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 12.  

Capstone Seminar. This course examines how consumer objects shape our senses of self, gender norms, bodily practices and erotic desires. We consider how gender and sexuality are shaped by material culture in an age of mass production. We consider pharmaceuticals, beauty products, sex toys, homemaking, and dating apps. Students take turns leading class discussions around readings, and organize an end-of-year conference on intimacy and consumer objects.

Prerequisites: Two of: GSWS 1101 and either GSWS 2001 (same as ENGL 2021) or GSWS 2201.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2021, Spring 2020, Spring 2019, Spring 2018.

GSWS 3302  (b)   The Economics of the Family  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 18.  

Seminar. Microeconomic analysis of the family, gender roles, and related institutions. Topics include marriage, fertility, married women’s labor supply, divorce, and the family as an economic organization. (Same as: ECON 3531)

Prerequisites: Two of: ECON 2555 and ECON 2557.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2019.

GSWS 3310  (c)   Gay and Lesbian Cinema  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Considers both mainstream and independent films made by or about gay men and lesbians. Four intensive special topics each semester, which may include classic Hollywood stereotypes and euphemisms; the power of the box office; coming of age and coming out; the social problem film; key figures; writing history through film; queer theory and queer aesthetics; revelation and revaluations of film over time; autobiography and documentary; the AIDS imperative. Writing intensive; attendance at evening film screenings is required. Note: Fulfills the film theory requirement for cinema studies minors. (Same as: CINE 3310)

Prerequisites: CINE 1000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2019.

GSWS 3320  (c)   Victorian Epics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Advanced seminar. Examines one of the foremost literary forms of the Victorian period: the long novel. By focusing on a few central texts, investigates the ways in which narrative length shapes stories about wide-ranging issues related to nationalism, science, technology, and empire, as well as allegedly local issues regarding domesticity, familial relations, personal adornment, and romance. Authors may include Charles Dickens, George Eliot, William Thackeray, and Anthony Trollope. (Same as: ENGL 3024)

Prerequisites: ENGL 1000 - 1049 or ENGL 1100 - 2969 or ENGL 3000 (same as GSWS 3000) or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

GSWS 3323  (c)   Voices of Women, Voices of the People  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Focuses on texts written by women from French-speaking West African, Central African, and Caribbean countries. Themes treated -- woman and/in colonization and slavery, memory, alienation, womanhood, individual and collective identity, gender relationships, women and tradition, women and modernism -- are approached from historical, anthropological, political, sociological, and gender perspectives. Readings by Tanella Boni (Côte dIvoire), Marie-Léontine Tsibinda (Congo-Brazzaville), Maryse Condé (Guadeloupe), Fabienne Kanor (Martinique), Marie-Célie Agnant (Haïti). (Same as: FRS 3201, AFRS 3201, LACL 3222)

Prerequisites: Two of: either FRS 2409 (same as AFRS 2409 and LAS 2209) or FRS 2410 (same as AFRS 2412 and LAS 2210) or FRS 3000 or higher and either FRS 2409 (same as AFRS 2409 and LAS 2209) or FRS 2410 (same as AFRS 2412 and LAS 2210) or FRS 3000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

GSWS 3350  (c, DPI, VPA)   Desire and Difference: Exploring Gender, Sexuality, and Race in Medieval Art  

Kate Gerry.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2021. Enrollment limit: 12.
  

Gender, sexuality, race, and other aspects of identity have come to play a huge role in our public and private lives, and these same issues can be key to understanding how people lived and understood their lives in the past. Through in-class discussion and individual research projects, students in this seminar examine intersections of these concerns with the visual arts produced in medieval Europe and the Mediterranean region (c. 500 --c. 1500), gaining a deeper and richer understanding of how people in the past imagined and depicted themselves and their lives, and negotiated their senses of identity. Specific topics covered will include representations of women and minoritized groups, the roles played by women as makers and patrons of art, and the relevance of modern categories of sexuality, gender, and race in the context of medieval studies. (Same as: ARTH 3350)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

GSWS 3430  (c, IP)   Encountering Colonialisms in Latin America  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

This advanced seminar examines the intersections between constructions of race, gender, nation, and cultural production in Latin America during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The countries we will focus on in this course are Cuba, Mexico, Brazil, Guatemala, and Argentina. Readings will be drawn from a variety of disciplines, including history, critical race and gender theory, literature, and anthropology. This course will be divided into two parts. During the first half of the semester, we will critically engage with some of the history and literature on mestizaje and the endurance of slavery during the nineteenth century. This will highlight how nationalist projects adopted legal and political methods of exclusion. The second part of the course focuses on how cultural production, such as art, literature, film, and music, questions and reforms the nineteenth century’s constructions of citizenship and human rights for indigenous and black subjects. (Same as: LAS 3430)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2020.

GSWS 3900  (c, IP, VPA)   Women, Performance, and Activism in the Americas  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Explores when, why, and how women organize collectively to challenge political, economic, and social injustice in the late twentieth century. This course investigates how civil rights and labor movements, the rise and fall of dictatorships, and neoliberalism impacted and continues to impact female cultural production and activism in the Americas. In our investigation, we will turn to the intersection between art and activism as we look at a wide range of artistic practices, from literature and film to site-specific performance art and interventionist art. Throughout the semester, we will revisit the following questions as we consider the development of female activism in the Americas: 1) what is the relationship between feminism and activism, 2) can literature and performance be placed at the service of activism, and 3) how does looking at the Americas as a whole enable us to better understand the shared injustices across the North/South divide? (Same as: LAS 3900)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2021, Fall 2019.