Bowdoin College Catalogue and Academic Handbook

Hispanic Studies (HISP)

HISP 1101  (c)   Elementary Spanish I  

Barbara Sawhill.
Every Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

An introduction to the grammar of Spanish, aimed at comprehension, reading, writing, and simple conversation. Emphasis is on grammar structure, with frequent oral drills. Hispanic Studies 1101 is primarily open to first- and second-year students, with a limited number of spaces available for juniors and seniors who have had less than one year of high school Spanish.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016.

HISP 1102  (c)   Elementary Spanish II  

Julia Venegas.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

Three class hours per week and weekly conversation sessions with assistant, plus laboratory assignments. An introduction to the grammar of Spanish, aimed at comprehension, reading, writing, and simple conversation. More attention is paid to reading and writing.

Prerequisites: HISP 1101 or Placement in HISP 1102.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017.

HISP 1103  (c)   Accelerated Elementary Spanish  

Every Semester. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Three class hours per week, plus one hour of weekly drill and conversation sessions with a teaching fellow. Covers in one semester what is covered in two semesters in the Spanish 1101-1102 sequence. Study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary. Emphasis on listening comprehension and spoken Spanish. By placement or permission of instructor, for students with an advanced knowledge of a Romance language or who would benefit from a review in the beginner’s stages. Not open to students who have credit in Hispanic Studies 1101 or 1102 (formerly Spanish 1101 or 1102).

Prerequisites: Placement in HISP 1103.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017.

HISP 2116  (c)   Spanish Cinema: Taboo and Tradition  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Introduces students to film produced in Spain, from the silent era to the present, focusing on the ways in which cinema can be a vehicle for promoting social and cultural values, as well as for exposing religious, sexual, or historical taboos in the form of counterculture, protest, or as a means for society to process change or cope with issues from the past. Looks at the role of film genre, authorship, and narrative in creating languages for perpetuating or contesting tradition, and how these apply to the specific Spanish context. Taught in English. Note: Fulfills the non-US cinema requirement for cinema studies minors. (Same as: CINE 2116)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

HISP 2203  (c)   Intermediate Spanish I  

Holly Sims; Barbara Sawhill; Elena Cueto Asin.
Every Semester. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with teaching assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.

Prerequisites: HISP 1102 or HISP 1103 or Placement in HISP 2203.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016.

HISP 2204  (c)   Intermediate Spanish II  

Carolyn Wolfenzon Niego; Nadia Celis.
Every Semester. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.

Prerequisites: HISP 2203 or Placement in HISP 2204.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016.

HISP 2220  (c, IP)   Health and Healing in Early Modern Spain and Spanish America  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 08.  

Explores a range of literary and cultural texts related to the theory, practice, and experience of health and healing in the early modern Hispanic world. Topics include gender and medicine; health and spiritual practices; herbalists and apothecaries; botanists and natural historians; gardens and gardeners; diet and food; healer and patients. Taught in English. Students wishing to take the course for Spanish credit should register for Hispanic Studies 3220 and complete all written work in Spanish. (Same as: LAS 2220)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

HISP 2305  (c)   Advanced Spanish  

Sebastian Urli.
Every Semester. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant. (Same as: LAS 2205)

Prerequisites: HISP 2204 or Placement in HISP 2305.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016.

HISP 2306  (c, ESD, IP)   Spanish Non-Fiction Writing Workshop  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 12.  

Designed for heritage speakers (who grew up speaking Spanish in the home), bilinguals, and other Spanish-speaking students. The class will examine nonfictional accounts of current events and issues in the Hispanic world written by leading Spanish and Latin American authors and journalists. Throughout the semester, students will conduct research on a given topic or a particular environment of their choosing, writing their own nonfictional accounts of their research. Students will gain valuable real world experience researching, reporting, and working with speakers of Spanish in Brunswick or the surrounding communities. Through work specifically tailored to individual needs, students will hone their writing skills and build confidence in the language. (Same as: LAS 2306)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

HISP 2409  (c, IP)   Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater  

Gustavo Faveron Patriau.
Every Semester. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. Conducted in Spanish. (Same as: LAS 2409)

Prerequisites: HISP 2305 (same as LAS 2205) or LAS 2205 or Placement in HISP 2409 or 2410.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016.

HISP 2410  (c, IP)   Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative  

Elena Cueto Asin; Holly Sims.
Every Semester. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. (Same as: LAS 2410)

Prerequisites: HISP 2305 (same as LAS 2205) or LAS 2205 or Placement in HISP 2409 or 2410.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016.

HISP 2505  (c, ESD)   The Making of a Race: Latino Fictions  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 18.  

Explores the creation, representation, and marketing of U.S. Latino/a identities in American literature and popular culture from the 1960s to the present. Focuses on the experiences of artists and writers of Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican origin; their negotiations with notions of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the United States; and their role in the struggle for social rights, in cultural translation, and in the marketing of ethnic identities, as portrayed in a variety of works ranging from movies and songs to poetry and narrative. Authors include Álvarez, Blades, Braschi, Díaz, Hijuelos, Ovejas, Pietri, and Quiñones. Readings and writing in English, discussions in Spanish. Spanish speaking skills required. (Same as: LAS 2005)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

HISP 2515  (c, IP)   Reading "Don Quixote"  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 08.  

Provides a semester immersion in the reading, words, and libraries of “Don Quixote” and its author, Miguel de Cervantes. Alongside close reading of the novel, students explore the material culture of early modern Spain as well as its afterlife and emergence into the digital world. The course also provides an introduction to manuscript and book culture through intensive collaboration with Bowdoin College special collections. Course discussion, reading, and writing in English. Students wishing to take the course for credit in Spanish should enroll in Hispanic Studies 3115.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

HISP 3005  (c, ESD)   The Making of a Race: Latino Fictions  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 18.  

Explores the creation, representation, and marketing of US Latino/a identities in American literature and popular culture from the 1960s to the present. Focuses on the experiences of artists and writers of Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican origin, their negotiations with notions of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the United States, their role in the struggle for social rights, in cultural translation, and in the marketing of ethnic identities, as portrayed in a variety of works ranging from movies and songs to poetry and narrative. Authors include Álvarez, Blades, Braschi, Díaz, Hijuelos, Ovejas, Pietri, and Quiñones. Readings in English, discussions and writing in Spanish. (Same as: LAS 3005)

Prerequisites: HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410).

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

HISP 3110  (c, IP, VPA)   Hispanic Theater and Performance  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 18.  

Explores the professionalization of Spanish theater, starting in Spain with the development of the three-act comedia and moving across the Atlantic within public theaters, courtyards, convent theaters, and the streets. Examines the topic of performance, considering staging, costuming, set design, the lives of actors, and adaptation in both historical and contemporary contexts. Playwrights of special focus include: Calderón de la Barca, Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, María de Zayas, Ana Caro, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, and Juan Ruiz de Alarcón. Taught in Spanish. (Same as: LAS 3210, THTR 3503)

Prerequisites: HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410).

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

HISP 3115  (c)   Reading "Don Quixote"  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 08.  

Provides a semester immersion in the reading, words, and libraries of “Don Quixote” and its author, Miguel de Cervantes. Alongside close reading of the novel, students explore the material culture of early modern Spain as well as its afterlife and emergence into the digital world. The course also provides an introduction to manuscript and book culture through intensive collaboration with Bowdoin College special collections. Course readings, discussion, and writing in Spanish.

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2017.

HISP 3116  (c)   Spanish Cinema: Taboo and Tradition  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Introduces students to film produced in Spain, from the silent era to the present, focusing on the ways in which cinema can be a vehicle for promoting social and cultural values, as well as for exposing religious, sexual, or historical taboos, in the form of counterculture, protest, or as a means for society to process change or cope with issues from the past. It looks at the role of film genre, authorship, and narrative in creating languages for perpetuating or contesting tradition, and how these apply to the specific Spanish context. Taught in English. Written assignments in Spanish.

Prerequisites: HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410).

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

HISP 3117  (c)   Hispanic Cities in Cinema: Utopia, Distopia, and Transnationality  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 15.  

Examines how cinema portrays urban spaces in Latin America, Spain and USA from an aesthetic point of view that facilitates discourses on Hispanic history and identity. It looks at the city (Barcelona, Bogotá, Buenos Aires, Habana, Los Angeles, Madrid, Mexico DF and New York) as a cinematic setting for narratives on crime, immigration, political activity and romance, and how it conveys utopic or distopic views of physical and social urban development. Also considers how cities lend themselves as transnational subjects for directors who cross national boundaries, such as Luis Buñuel, Woody Allen, Pedro Almodóvar and Alejandro González Iñárritu. Conducted in English. Writing assignments in Spanish. (Same as: LAS 3217)

Prerequisites: HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410).

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

HISP 3218  (c)   A Journey around Macondo: Garcia Marquez and His Contemporaries  

Nadia Celis.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Studies the main topics, techniques, and contributions of Colombian Nobel Prize winner Gabriel García Márquez as presented in “One Hundred Years of Solitude.” Explores the actual locations and the social, cultural, and literary trends that inspired the creation of Macondo, the so-called village of the world where the novel takes place, and the universal themes to which this imaginary town relates. Contemporary authors include Fuenmayor, Rojas Herazo, and Cepeda Samudio . (Same as: LAS 3218)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

HISP 3219  (c)   Letters from the Asylum: Madness and Representation in Latin American Fiction  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Explores the concept of madness and the varying ways in which mental illness has been represented in twentieth-century Latin American fiction. Readings include short stories and novels dealing with the issues of schizophrenia, paranoia, and psychotic behavior by authors such as Jorge Luis Borges, Carlos Fuentes, Cristina Rivera Garza, and Horacio Quiroga. . Also studies the ways in which certain authors draw from the language and symptoms of schizophrenia and paranoia in order to construct the narrative structure of their works and in order to enhance their representation of social, political, and historical conjunctures. Authors include César Aira, Roberto Bolaño, Diamela Eltit, and Ricardo Piglia, . (Same as: LAS 3219)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

HISP 3220  (c, IP)   Health and Healing in Early Modern Spain and Spanish America  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 08.  

Explores a range of literary and cultural texts related to the theory, practice and experience of health and healing in the early modern Hispanic world. Topics include gender and medicine; health and spiritual practices; herbalists and apothecaries; botanists and natural historians; gardens and gardeners; diet and food; healer and patients. Taught in English; all written work will be completed in Spanish. (Same as: LAS 3220)

Prerequisites: Two of: HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) and HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410).

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

HISP 3223  (c)   The War of the (Latin American) Worlds  

Carolyn Wolfenzon Niego.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Discusses the historical, social, and political consequences of the clash between tradition and modernity in Latin America during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as seen through novels, short stories, and film. Particular attention will be given to the ways in which the processes of modernization have caused the coexistence of divergent worlds within Latin American countries. Analyzes different social and political reactions to these conflictive realities, focusing on four cases: the Mexican Revolution, the Cuban Revolution, the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in Chile, and Andean insurgencies in Perú. Authors to be read may include Reinaldo Arenas, Roberto Bolaño, Simón Bolívar, Jorge Luis Borges, Cromwell Jara, Mario Vargas Llosa, Gabriel García Márquez, José Martí, Elena Poniatowska, and Juan Rulfo, among others. (Same as: LAS 3223)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

HISP 3224  (c)   Modern Spanish Theater in Context  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Studies plays by Spanish authors from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries in light of the broader cultural, social, and political context in which they are produced, read, and performed. Theatrical texts are analyzed as a product of historical as well as aesthetic changes, and in relation to other literary and cultural productions (film, journalism, narrative, poetry and the visual arts). Conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

HISP 3225  (c)   Self-Figuration and Identity in Contemporary Southern Cone Literature  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Who speaks in a text? What relationship exists between literature and identity? How can we portray ourselves in specific political contexts? Addresses these and other questions by studying contemporary Southern Cone literary texts that deal with problems of subjectivity and self- representation in poetry and novels. Concentrates on texts that display a literary “persona” in contexts of violence and resistance (the dictatorships of the 1970s) and in more contemporary Latin American ones. Some authors include Borges, Gelman, and Peri-Rossi. Films and contextual historical readings used. Taught in Spanish. (Same as: LAS 3225)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

HISP 3226  (c)   A Body "of One's Own": Latina and Caribbean Women Writers  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

What kind of stories do bodies tell or conceal? How are those stories affected by living in a gendered body/subject? How do embodied stories relate to history and social realities? These are some of the questions addressed in this study of contemporary writing by women from the Hispanic Caribbean and the United States Latina/Chicana communities. Films and popular culture dialogue with literary works and feminist theory to enhance the examination of the relation of bodies and sexuality to social power, and the role of this relation in the shaping of both personal and national identities. Authors include Julia Álvarez, Fanny Buitrago, Judith Ortiz Cofer, Magali García Ramis, and Mayra Santos-Febres, among others. Taught in Spanish with readings in Spanish and English.. (Same as: GSWS 3326, LAS 3226)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

HISP 3227  (c, IP)   The Hispanic Avant-Garde: Poetry and Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Questions what is meant by "avant-garde": how it was manifested in the Hispanic world in the first half of the twentieth century; how contemporaneous politics shaped or became shaped by it; how this relates to the world today. Focuses on poets such as Aleixandre, Garcia Lorca, Borges, Neruda, Huidobro, Storni, Lange, Novo, and Vallejo, while also considering a wide array of manifestos, literary journals, films, and other art forms from Spain, Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, Peru, Mexico, and Brazil. Taught in Spanish with some theoretical and historical readings in English. (Same as: LAS 3227)

Prerequisites: Two of: HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) and HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410).

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

HISP 3228  (c)   Beyond the Postcard: Thinking and Writing the Caribbean  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

From the first chronicles of Columbus, who believed he had arrived in "The Indies,” to the fantasies of global visitors lured by the comforts of secluded resorts, imagination has been a defining force impacting both the representation and the material lives of Caribbean people. Explores the historical trends that have shaped Caribbean societies, cultural identities, and intellectual history through a panoramic study of twentieth- and twenty-first-century fiction, essays, and films, with a focus on authors from the Hispanic Caribbean and US-Latinas of Caribbean descent. Engaging with the responses from Caribbean intellectuals to the challenges of the distorting mirror, addresses: how writers and artists have responded to the legacy of colonialism, slavery, and the plantation economy; how literature and art have depicted dominant trends in the region’s more recent history such as absolutist regimes, massive migrations, the tourist industry, and even natural disasters; how the Caribbean drawn by artists and intellectuals relates to global representations of the region. Authors include Piñera, Padura, Santos-Febres, Chaviano, and Junot Díaz. Taught in Spanish. (Same as: AFRS 3228, LAS 3228)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

HISP 3230  (c)   Colonial Seductions in Spanish America  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Studies how divergent European and indigenous conceptions of marriage, sex, and sin shaped the colonization of the Spanish Americas during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. A variety of conquest histories, epics, and plays by authors like Hernán Cortés, Titu Cusi Yupanqui, and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz are read alongside theoretical texts on the study of gender, sexuality, and colonialism. Through historical and literary analyses, considers how Europeans and indigenous subjects understood, imposed, and violated sexual norms. Conducted in Spanish. (Same as: GSWS 3230, LAS 3230)

Prerequisites: SPAN 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or SPAN 3200 or higher or SPAN 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

HISP 3231  (c, IP)   Sor Juana and María de Zayas: Early Modern Feminisms  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Did feminism exist in the early modern period? Examines key women authors from the early Hispanic World, considering the representation of gender, sexuality, race, and identity in distinct political and social contexts. Focuses on Mexican author Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (1651-1695) and Spanish author María de Zayas (1590-1661), alongside other prominent women writers from the period. Students read short stories, essays, poems, and personal letters. Conducted in Spanish. (Same as: GSWS 3231, LAS 3231)

Prerequisites: HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410).

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

HISP 3235  (c, IP)   Mexican Fictions: Voices from the Border  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Explores the representation of Mexican history in literature by Mexico’s most canonical writers of the twentieth and early twenty-first century. Key moments in the history of Mexico discussed include the Mexican Revolution and its legacy, the struggles for modernization, the 1968 massacre of Tlatelolco, the concept of the border from a Mexican perspective, immigration to the United States, and the War on Drugs. Literary texts in a variety of genres (short stories, novellas, novels, theater, essays, chronicles and film) are complemented by historical readings and critical essays.. Authors include: Mariano Azuela, Sabina Berman, Rosario Castellanos, Luis Humberto Crosthwite, Carlos Fuentes, Yuri Herrera, Jorge Ibarguengoitia, Octavio Paz, Valeria Luiselli, Elmer Mendoza, Guadalupe Nettel, Octavio Paz, Juan Rulfo, Daniel Sada, Paco Ignacio Taibo II, and Helena María Viramontes (Same as: LAS 3235)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

HISP 3237  (c)   Hispanic Short Story  

Gustavo Faveron Patriau.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

An investigation of the short story as a literary genre, beginning in the nineteenth century, involving discussion of its aesthetics, as well as its political, social, and cultural ramifications in the Spanish-speaking world. Authors include Pardo Bazán, Borges, Cortázar, Echevarría, Ferré, García Márquez, and others. (Same as: LAS 3237)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

HISP 3239  (c)   Borges and the Borgesian  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

An examination of the Argentinian writer Jorge Luis Borges’s work, focusing not only on his short stories, poems, essays, film scripts, interviews, and cinematic adaptations, but also on the writers who had a particular influence on his work. Also studies Latin American, European, and United States writers who were later influenced by the Argentinian master. An organizing concept is Borges’s idea that a writer creates his own precursors. (Same as: LAS 3239)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

HISP 3243  (c)   Imaginary Cities/Real Cities in Latin America  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines the representation of urban spaces in Spanish American literature during the last six decades. While mid-twentieth-century fictional towns such as Macondo and Comala tended to emphasize exoticism, marginality, and remoteness, more recent narratives have abandoned the “magical” and tend to take place in metropolitan spaces that coincide with contemporary large cities such as Lima and Buenos Aires. The treatment of social class divisions and transgressions, territoriality, and the impact of the space on the individual experience are studied in novels, short stories, and film from the 1950s to the present. Authors include Rulfo, García Márquez, Onetti, Donoso, Vargas Llosa, Sábato, Reynoso, Ribeyro, Piñera, Gutiérrez, Bellatín, Caicedo, and Junot Díaz, among others. (Same as: LAS 3243)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

HISP 3247  (c)   Translating Cultures  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Far beyond the linguistic exercise of converting words from one language to another, translation is an art that engages the practitioner in cultural, political, and aesthetic questions. How does translation influence national identity? What are the limits of translation? Can culture be translated? How does gender affect translation? Students explore these questions and develop strategies and techniques through translating texts from a variety of cultural contexts and literary and non-literary genres. Also explores ethics and techniques of interpreting between Spanish and English in different fields. Course taught in Spanish. (Same as: LAS 3247)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016.

HISP 3249  (c, IP)   The Southern Cone Revisited: Contemporary Challenges  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

How do artists distinguish their contemporary moment from the past? What challenges does it pose to literature and film? Building on ideas by Agamben, Benjamin, and Didi-Huberman, explores these questions in the context of contemporary Argentinean, Chilean, and Uruguayan poetry, short stories, novels, and films. Topics include post-dictatorship societies, text/image dynamics, new forms of subjectivity, human/post-human interactions, and economic and bio-political violence, as seen in works by Sergio Chejfec, Cristina Peri Rossi, Nadia Prado, Gabriela Cabezón Cámara, Pedro Lemebel, Fernanda Trías, and others. Taught in Spanish. (Same as: LAS 3250)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

HISP 3251  (c, IP)    Attesting to Violence: Aesthetics of War and Peace in Contemporary Colombia  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

The enduring armed conflict in Colombia has nurtured a culture of violence, with effects in every sector of society. Among its better-known actors are the leftist guerrillas, the right-wing paramilitary forces, and the national army, all influenced by the rise of drug trafficking in the Americas and by United States interventions. This course focuses on how contemporary Colombian writers and artists have responded to war, and how they resist the erasure of memory resulting from pervasive violence. In light of the most recent peace process, the course also examines how artists, activists, and civil society are using aesthetics, arts, and performance to face challenges such as healing the wounds of conflict and inventing peace in a society whose younger generations have no memory of life without violence. Materials include articles in the social sciences, movies, and TV series, along with literary works (Abad, García Márquez, Restrepo, and Vásquez, among others). (Same as: LAS 3251)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

HISP 3252  (c, IP)   The Battle of Chile: From Allende to Pinochet  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

In 1970, the Chilean Salvador Allende became one of the first Marxists in the world to be democratically elected president of a country. His attempted reforms led to years of social unrest. In 1973, a right-wing military coup led to what would be General Augusto Pinochet’s seventeen years of brutal dictatorship. This course discusses that period of Chilean (and Latin American) history through locally produced sources, both from the social sciences and the arts, with a focus on literature (Bolaño, Meruane, Lemebel, Neruda, Lihn) and cinema (Ruiz, Larraín), with the goal of understanding the ways in which Latin American nations deal with their historical past with regard to issues of memory, collective memory, postdictatorial political negotiations, human rights, and social reconciliation. (Same as: LAS 3252)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.