Bowdoin College Catalogue and Academic Handbook

Latin American Studies (LAS)

LAS 1045  (c, FYS)   Social Justice Warriors of the Americas  

Irina Popescu.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

What are human rights? How do literature, art, history, and other methods of cultural production engage with human rights? These are some of the questions explored as the concept of ‘human rights’—with the hemispheric context by developing a critical dialogue with novels, poems, short stories, scholarly articles, music, performance poetry, photography, and film—is investigated. This exploration helps to inform an understanding of how struggles of culture, gender, and race work to shape these discourses in the Americas, from colonialism to present-day immigration issues. Students’ skills in close reading, critical thinking, and analytical writing are refined, while the relationships between these skills are closely considered. In addition to discussing the texts in class, students write responses to them in a variety of forms, from literary analysis essays to creative projects to a final research paper.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

LAS 1046  (c, FYS)   'Deviant' Lives in Latin America  

Javier Cikota.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Explores the lives of particular Latin American people who found themselves being "boxed in," and the ways in which they have sought to remain outside, or even in-between, categories. We will consider issues of personal identity, social belonging, and state power through the lives and stories—some well-known, and some surprisingly obscure—of Latin Americans, from the 1500s to the present. Course writing gives students the opportunity to engage with primary sources, perform independent research, and explore how personal identities have been created, maintained, and challenged over the centuries. This course aims to improve students’ skills in close reading, critical thinking, and analytical writing, while the relationships between these skills are closely considered. In addition to discussing the texts in class, students will write responses to them in a variety of forms, from close analysis, to creative projects, to a final research paper. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for History majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 1046)

LAS 1271  (c, IP, VPA)   Experiencing Latin American Music  

Ireri Chavez-Barcenas.
Every Other Fall. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 50.
  

An opportunity to experience Latin American history, heritage, and culture through its music. Students will explore general issues of race, identity, religion, and politics from a broad chronological span—from the sixteenth to the twenty-first century—and will relate these to Latin American music. The course will cover a wide variety of music genres and contexts (e.g., opera, film music, bachata, son jarocho, sacred polyphony, salsa, chamber music, and more) and will introduce general elements of music, such as pitch, melody, rhythm, texture, musical time, and form. (Same as: MUS 1271)

LAS 1300  (c, IP, VPA)   Introduction to the Arts of Ancient Mexico and Peru  

Susan Wegner.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 50.
  

A chronological survey of the arts created by major cultures of ancient Mexico and Peru. Mesoamerican cultures studied include the Olmec, Teotihuacan, the Maya, and the Aztec up through the arrival of the Europeans. South American cultures such as Chavín, Nasca, and Inca are examined. Painting, sculpture, and architecture are considered in the context of religion and society. Readings in translation include Mayan myth and chronicles of the conquest. (Same as: ARTH 1300)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016.

LAS 2005  (c, ESD)   The Making of a Race: Latinx Fictions  

Nadia Celis.
Non-Standard Rotation. Spring 2020. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Explores the creation, representation, and marketing of US Latinx identities in American literature and popular culture from the 1960s. Focuses on the experience of authors of Caribbean origin (Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican), their negotiations with notions of race, class, gender, and sexuality in Latin America and the US, and their role in cultural translation, the struggle for migrants’ rights, and the definition of “American” citizenship. Course materials include literature, film, tv shows, and articles in the humanities and social sciences. In addition to the themes addressed by individual authors (ranging from border crossing to coming of age in dystopian worlds), discussions engage changing notions of “Latinidad” in the last half century; their historical context; the role of language and the media in their production and contestation; and how artists adapt to and resist the branding of ethnic and racial identities. Authors include Thomas, Stevans, Obejas, Rivera, and Engels. Taught in English. (Same as: HISP 2505)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

LAS 2100  (c, ESD, IP)   Borderlands in the Americas: Power and Identity Between Empire and Nation  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 16.  

The study of borderlands examines areas of contested sovereignty where no single social group has political, cultural, or economic control. Explores interactions between native peoples, white settlers, and the representatives of the states in the Americas between the seventeenth and the nineteenth centuries. An examination of power and identity in borderlands considers a variety of regions in the hemisphere, from the Pacific Northwest to the Yucatan, from Texas to the Amazon. Pays special attention to how structures of race, class, and gender were established, maintained, and negotiated at times of uncertain change and in the absence of hegemonic state practice. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America. It fulfills the non euro/US requirements for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 2900)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

LAS 2104  (c, IP)   History of Mexico  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

A survey of Mexican history from pre-Columbian times to the present. Topics include the evolving character of indigenous societies, the nature of the Encounter, the colonial legacy, the chaotic nineteenth century, the Mexican Revolution, and United States-Mexican relations. Contemporary problems are also addressed. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America. (Same as: HIST 2404)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016.

LAS 2110  (c, ESD, IP)   Race and Belonging in Latin America  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. This course is a study of race and ethnicity in Latin America, focusing on how Latin Americans themselves have understood and articulated these categories, as well as how scholars have interpreted their articulations. We will cover topics from African slavery to indigenous activism and mass immigration. Our focus will be on peoples of indigenous and African descent—the majority of Latin Americans—which will allow us to address questions of national identity, racial mixture, and cultural exchanges. We will trace themes familiar to students of the broader Atlantic world (themes such as race and nation, freedom and slavery, citizenship, and inequality) across the less-familiar setting of modern Brazil, Cuba, Guatemala, Mexico, Bolivia, Peru, and even Argentina. This course will tackle fundamental questions about the intersection of race, identity, and power in Latin America. Besides reading some of the classic analyses, we will look at some of the cutting-edge scholarship to assess how ideas of race and national belonging have changed through the centuries and across national contexts. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America. It fulfills the non-Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 2910)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

LAS 2160  (c, IP)   The United States and Latin America: Tempestuous Neighbors  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Examines scholarship on the evolution of United States-Latin American relations since Independence. Topics include the Monroe Doctrine, commercial relations, interventionism, Pan Americanism, immigration, and revolutionary movements during the Cold War. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: non-European/United States and United States. (Same as: HIST 2860)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016.

LAS 2161  (c, IP)   Contemporary Argentina  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Texts, novels, and films help unravel Argentine history and culture. Topics examined include the image of the gaucho and national identity; the impact of immigration; Peronism; the tango; the Dirty War; and the elusive struggle for democracy, development, and social justice. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America. (Same as: HIST 2861)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

LAS 2162  (c, IP)   The Haitian Revolution and its Legacy  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Seminar. Examines one of the most neglected revolutions in history, and arguably, one of its most significant. The first half of the course treats the Revolution’s causes and tracks its evolution between 1791-1804. The second part studies its aftermath and its impact on Haiti, the Caribbean, Latin America, Europe, Africa, and the United States. Course requirements include four short papers on the readings and one substantive paper that assesses the scholarly literature on a topic of the student’s choosing. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America, Atlantic Worlds, and Colonial Worlds. (Same as: HIST 2862, AFRS 2862)

Prerequisites: HIST 1000 - 2969 or LAS 1000 - 2969.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

LAS 2171  (c, ESD, IP)   Race and Culture in Brazil: The Paradox of Progress  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Brazil is a country of paradoxes. Often hailed as an example of egalitarian race relations and a model for accepting difference, Brazil is also frequently cited for its economic inequality, incidence of violence, and uneven development—all of which cut along the lines of race and class. Explores the unique contradictions shaping Brazilian society, from the colonial period until the present. Discusses the visual representations of conquest, slavery, the creation of republican symbols, authoritarianism, race and racism, and social movements, as well as the construction of a national identity though music and other artistic expressions. Pays close attention to the ways in which Brazilian culture and society have been shaped by race, class, and other relations of power and exclusion. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 2287)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

LAS 2180  (c, ESD, IP)   Natives, Borderlands, and Empires in Early North America  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Survey of the making of North America from initial contact between Europeans and Africans and Native Americans to the creation of the continent’s three largest nations by the mid-nineteenth century: Canada, Mexico, and the United States. Topics include the history of native populations before and after contact; geopolitical and imperial rivalries that propelled European conquests of the Americas; evolution of free and coerced labor systems; environmental transformations of the continent’s diverse landscapes and peoples; formation of colonial settler societies; and the emergence of distinct national identities and cultures in former European colonies. Students write several papers and engage in weekly discussion based upon primary and secondary documents, art, literature, and material culture. Note: This course is part of the following field(s) of study: United States, Atlantic Worlds, Colonial Worlds, and Latin America. (Same as: HIST 2180, ENVS 2425)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2016.

LAS 2205  (c)   Advanced Spanish  

Carolyn Wolfenzon Niego; Holly Sims; Sebastian Urli.
Every Semester. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant. (Same as: HISP 2305)

Prerequisites: HISP 2204 or Placement in HISP 2305.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016.

LAS 2209  (c, ESD, IP)   Spoken Word and Written Text  

Hanetha Vete-Congolo; Charlotte Daniels.
Every Semester. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

Examines oral and written traditions of areas where French is spoken in Africa, the Caribbean, Europe, and North America from the Middle Ages to 1848. Through interdisciplinary units, students examine key moments in the history of the francophone world, drawing on folktales, epics, poetry, plays, short stories, essays, and novels. Explores questions of identity, race, colonization, and language in historical and ideological context. Taught in French. (Same as: FRS 2409, AFRS 2409)

Prerequisites: FRS 2305 or higher or Placement in FRS 2400 level.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016.

LAS 2210  (c, ESD, IP)   Literature, Power, and Resistance  

Ian MacDonald; Meryem Belkaid.
Every Semester. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

Examines questions of power and resistance as addressed in the literary production of the French-speaking world from the nineteenth through the twenty-first centuries. Examines how language and literature serve as tools for both oppression and liberation during periods of turmoil: political and social revolutions, colonization and decolonization, the first and second world wars. Authors may include Hugo, Sand, Sartre, Fanon, Senghor, Yacine, Beauvoir, Condé, Césaire, Djebar, Camus, Modiano, Perec, and Piketty. Students gain familiarity with a range of genres and artistic movements and explore the myriad ways that literature and language reinforce boundaries and register dissent. Taught in French. (Same as: FRS 2410, AFRS 2412)

Prerequisites: FRS 2305 or higher or Placement in FRS 2400 level.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016.

LAS 2220  (c, IP)   Health and Healing in Early Modern Spain and Spanish America  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 08.  

Explores a range of literary and cultural texts related to the theory, practice, and experience of health and healing in the early modern Hispanic world. Topics include gender and medicine; health and spiritual practices; herbalists and apothecaries; botanists and natural historians; gardens and gardeners; diet and food; healer and patients. Taught in English. Students wishing to take the course for Spanish credit should register for Hispanic Studies 3220 and complete all written work in Spanish. (Same as: HISP 2220)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

LAS 2306  (c, ESD, IP)   Spanish Non-Fiction Writing Workshop  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 12.  

Designed for heritage speakers (who grew up speaking Spanish in the home), bilinguals, and other Spanish-speaking students. The class will examine nonfictional accounts of current events and issues in the Hispanic world written by leading Spanish and Latin American authors and journalists. Throughout the semester, students will conduct research on a given topic or a particular environment of their choosing, writing their own nonfictional accounts of their research. Students will gain valuable real world experience researching, reporting, and working with speakers of Spanish in Brunswick or the surrounding communities. Through work specifically tailored to individual needs, students will hone their writing skills and build confidence in the language. (Same as: HISP 2306)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

LAS 2345  (b, IP)   Carnival and Control: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Brazil  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Every year, Brazilians pour onto the street to celebrate carnival, with its festive traditions of gender ambiguity, sexual libertinism, and inversion of social hierarchies. Questions how this image of diversity and freedom is squared with Brazil's practices of social control: high rates of economic inequality and police violence, as well as limited reproductive rights. Using carnival and control as frameworks, examines how contemporary Brazilian society articulates gender roles and sexual identities, as well as racial and class hierarchies. While course content focuses on Brazil, topics addressed are relevant to students seeking to understand how institutions of intimacy, propriety, and power are worked out through interpersonal relations. (Same as: GSWS 2345, ANTH 2345)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

LAS 2401  (c, ESD, IP)   Colonial Latin America  

Every Other Fall. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Introduces students to the history of Latin America from pre-Columbian times to 1825. Follows three interrelated stories: the establishment of colonial rule, including institutions of social control; the development of extractive economies dependent on unfree labor; and the evolution of a hybrid mestizo culture bringing together indigenous, European, and African traditions. Specific topics addressed include the nature of indigenous and Iberian society before contact; the creation of mestizo culture and the ambiguous role of the church in sustaining it; the evolving colonial economies and their reliance on exploitation of human and natural resources; and the evolving place of women, family, and kinship in colonial society. Considers the wars of independence in Spanish and Portuguese America, placing them in the context of broader Atlantic upheaval while highlighting the continuities between colonial and national periods. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America. It also meets the pre-modern and on euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 2401)

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2016.

LAS 2402  (c, ESD, IP)   Modern Latin America: From Subjects to Citizens  

Every Spring. Enrollment limit: 35.  

Introduces students to the history of Latin America from independence to the present. This course follows three interrelated stories: the struggle for citizenship by indigenous, formerly enslaved, and immigrant subjects; the development of export-oriented economies that concentrated land in the hand of a few elites; and the evolution of national (often popular) culture that brought together indigenous, European, and African traditions. Specific topics treated in this course include the wars of independence and their consequences; the creation of national identities built in opposition to the colonial heritage; the development of capitalist economies integrated with world markets; the evolving place of women and family in society; the rise and fall of populist movements, the role of institutions of social control in disciplining society; the preponderance of military regimes throughout the region; and the ambivalent role of international players in domestic affairs; as well as the emergence of discourses around human rights. (Same as: HIST 2402)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2017, Fall 2015.

LAS 2403  (c, ESD, IP)   Revolutions in Latin America: The People Take the Stage  

Javier Cikota.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Examines revolutionary change in Latin America from a historical perspective, concentrating on four successful social revolutions-- Haiti, Mexico, Cuba, and Bolivia-- as well as several revolutionary movements that did not result in social change-- including Argentina, Guatemala, Chile, Nicaragua, and Venezuela. Popular images and orthodox interpretations are challenged and new propositions about these processes are tested. External and internal dimensions of each of these social movements are analyzed and each revolution is discussed in the full context of the country’s historical development. This course fulfills the non-Euro/US requirement This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America. (Same as: HIST 2403)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

LAS 2407  (c, ESD, IP)   Francophone Cultures  

Jacques Gerard Keubeung Fokou.
Every Spring. Spring 2020. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

An introduction to the cultures of various French-speaking regions outside of France. Examines the history, politics, customs, cinema, and the arts of the Francophone world, principally Africa and the Caribbean. Increases cultural understanding prior to study abroad in French-speaking regions. (Same as: FRS 2407, AFRS 2407)

Prerequisites: FRS 2305 or higher or Placement in FRS 2400 level.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017.

LAS 2409  (c, IP)   Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater  

Sebastian Urli; Gustavo Faveron Patriau.
Every Semester. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. Conducted in Spanish. (Same as: HISP 2409)

Prerequisites: HISP 2305 (same as LAS 2205) or LAS 2205 or Placement in HISP 2409 or 2410.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016.

LAS 2410  (c, IP)   Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative  

Elena Cueto Asin; Holly Sims.
Every Semester. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. (Same as: HISP 2410)

Prerequisites: HISP 2305 (same as LAS 2205) or LAS 2205 or Placement in HISP 2409 or 2410.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016.

LAS 2513  (b, IP)   Food, Environment, and Development  

Shana Starobin.
Non-Standard Rotation. Spring 2020. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Explores the nexus of food, environment, and development in global environmental politics. Examines the interconnected challenges of governing across trans-boundary socio-ecological systems amidst competing demands on scarce natural resources—to sustain a global food system, foster economic development, and promote equity and justice. Prepares students to engage with interdisciplinary scholarship from political science, international development, public policy, and food studies. Draws on comparative cases from local to global scales, with an emphasis on Maine, the U.S., and Latin America. (Same as: ENVS 2313, GOV 2482)

Prerequisites: ENVS 1101 or ENVS 2330 (same as GOV 2910).

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

LAS 2720  (c, ESD, VPA)   Between the Alamo and the Wall: Latinx Activism in the United States  

Irina Popescu.
Non-Standard Rotation. Spring 2020. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

This course explores the range of issues inspiring Latinx activism and its diverse expressions across the United States from the turn of the 20th century to the present. It introduces students to the intellectual traditions and analytical approaches that inform both Latinx and Afro-Latinx activism in the US During the course of the semester students will ‘travel’ to U.S. cities (and regions) such as San Antonio and the Texas Borderlands, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Chicago, and the Central Valley in California. As we ‘travel’ to these locations, we will explore diverse expressions of Latinx activism, including labor activism, cultural activism, political activism surrounding citizenship rights, and the struggles for gender and sexuality rights. Students will also learn about the many similarities and differences among Latinx communities in the United States, including Afo-Latinx communities, specifically Afro-Cuban in Miami, and Afro-Puerto Ricans and Afro-Domincans in New York. We will explore how these communities have used and continue to use activist practices ranging from labor strikes to literary texts, to gain visibility and negotiate their rights within the country. This course will also draw connections between Latinx and Afro-Latinx and other activist movements in the US, from civil rights to labor rights and the formation of worker’s unions. Drawing from various disciplines including history, law, literature, sociology, and cultural studies, students will explore how Latinx activism has shaped understandings of race and inclusion, gender, sexuality, and citizenship in the United States.

LAS 2737  (b, ESD, IP)   Family, Gender,and Sexuality in Latin America  

Krista Van Vleet.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 35.
  

Focuses on family, gender, and sexuality as windows onto political, economic, social, and cultural issues in Latin America. Topics include indigenous and natural gender ideologies, marriage, race, and class; machismo and masculinity; state and domestic violence; religion and reproductive control; compulsory heterosexuality; AIDS; and cross-cultural conceptions of homosexuality. Takes a comparative perspective and draws on a wide array of sources including ethnography, film, fiction, and historical narrative. (Same as: ANTH 2737, GSWS 2237)

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101 or SOC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

LAS 3005  (c, ESD)   The Making of a Race: Latino Fictions  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 18.  

Explores the creation, representation, and marketing of US Latino/a identities in American literature and popular culture from the 1960s to the present. Focuses on the experiences of artists and writers of Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican origin, their negotiations with notions of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the United States, their role in the struggle for social rights, in cultural translation, and in the marketing of ethnic identities, as portrayed in a variety of works ranging from movies and songs to poetry and narrative. Authors include Álvarez, Blades, Braschi, Díaz, Hijuelos, Ovejas, Pietri, and Quiñones. Readings in English, discussions and writing in Spanish. (Same as: HISP 3005)

Prerequisites: HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410).

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

LAS 3103  (c)   The Cuban Revolution  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

The Cuban Revolution recently celebrated its fiftieth anniversary. Offers a retrospective of a Revolution entering “middle age” and its prospects for the future. Topics include United States-Cuban relations, economic and social justice versus political liberty, gender and race relations, and literature and film in a socialist society. This course is part of the following field(s) of study: Latin America. (Same as: HIST 3403)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015.

LAS 3142  (c, IP)    Cities and the Urban Experience in Latin America  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

By looking at the history of key cities and the challenges of urban life in Latin America, this seminar examines how the city has served as a site of contestation and politics throughout the region. Topics discussed in the seminar will include top-down efforts to impose order and discipline on the city and the response of urban dwellers; planned and unplanned urban spaces; the rise of slums; marginality; informality; and the formation of urban identities. We will also analyze the role of cities in the construction of social and political rights and explore the city as a site of creativity. The course will focus primarily on 20th century cities but will also explore urban life in the 19th Century and the colonial period, to a lesser extent. Special attention will be paid to the following cities: Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Mexico City, Oaxaca, Buenos Aires, Santiago, Caracas, and Brasilia. Note: This course is part of the following field(s of study: Latin America. It fulfills the non Euro/US requirement for history majors and minors. (Same as: HIST 2294)

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

LAS 3210  (c, IP, VPA)   Hispanic Theater and Performance  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 18.  

Explores the professionalization of Spanish theater, starting in Spain with the development of the three-act comedia and moving across the Atlantic within public theaters, courtyards, convent theaters, and the streets. Examines the topic of performance, considering staging, costuming, set design, the lives of actors, and adaptation in both historical and contemporary contexts. Playwrights of special focus include: Calderón de la Barca, Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, María de Zayas, Ana Caro, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, and Juan Ruiz de Alarcón. Taught in Spanish. (Same as: HISP 3110, THTR 3503)

Prerequisites: HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410).

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

LAS 3211  (c)   Bringing the Female Maroon to Memory: Female Marronage and Douboutism in French Caribbean Literature  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

History has retained the names of great male Caribbean heroes and freedom fighters during slavery such as the Haitians, Mackandal or Toussaint Louverture, the Jamaican, Cudjoe or the Cuban Coba. Enslaved Africans who rebelled against oppression and fled from the plantation system are called maroons and their act, marronage. Except for Queen Nanny of the Jamaican Blue Mountains, only male names have been consecrated as maroons. Yet, enslaved women did fight against slavery and practice marronage. Caribbean writers have made a point of bringing to memory forgotten acts of marronage by women during slavery or shortly thereafter. Proposes to examine the fictional treatment French-speaking Caribbean authors grant to African or Afro-descent women who historically rebelled against slavery and colonization. Literary works studied against the backdrop of douboutism, a conceptual framework derived from the common perception about women in the French Caribbeanwhich means strong woman. Authors studied may include Suzanne Dracius (Martinique), Fabienne Kanor (Martinique), André Schwart-Bart (Guadeloupe), Maryse Condé (Guadeloupe), Evelyn Trouillot (Haiti). Conducted in French. (Same as: FRS 3211, AFRS 3211, GSWS 3211)

Prerequisites: Two of: either FRS 2409 (same as AFRS 2409 and LAS 2209) or FRS 2410 (same as AFRS 2412 and LAS 2210) or FRS 3000 or higher and either FRS 2409 (same as AFRS 2409 and LAS 2209) or FRS 2410 (same as AFRS 2412 and LAS 2210) or FRS 3000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

LAS 3213  (c)   Aesthetics in Africa and Europe  

Hanetha Vete-Congolo.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 18.
  

Aesthetics -- the critical reflection on art, taste, and culture; as much as beauty, the set of properties of an object that arouses pleasure--are central to all aspects of society-building and human life and relationships. Examines the notions of aesthetics and beauty, from pre-Colonial to contemporary times in cultures of the African and Western civilizations as expressed in various humanities and social sciences texts, as well as the arts, iconography, and the media. Considers the ways Africans and afro-descendants in the New World responded to the Western notions of aesthetics and beauty. Authors studied may include Anténor Firmin, Jean Price Mars, Senghor, Damas, Césaire, Cheick Anta Diop, Fanon, Glissant, Chamoiseau, Gyekye Kwame, Socrates, Plato, Jean-Baptiste du Bos,Diderot, Le père André, Baumgarten, Kant, Schopenhauer, Hegel, Hugo. (Same as: FRS 3213, AFRS 3213)

Prerequisites: Two of: either FRS 2409 (same as AFRS 2409 and LAS 2209) or FRS 2410 (same as AFRS 2412 and LAS 2210) or FRS 3000 or higher and either FRS 2409 (same as AFRS 2409 and LAS 2209) or FRS 2410 (same as AFRS 2412 and LAS 2210) or FRS 3000 or higher.

LAS 3217  (c)   Hispanic Cities in Cinema: Utopia, Distopia, and Transnationality  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 15.  

Examines how cinema portrays urban spaces in Latin America, Spain and USA from an aesthetic point of view that facilitates discourses on Hispanic history and identity. It looks at the city (Barcelona, Bogotá, Buenos Aires, Habana, Los Angeles, Madrid, Mexico DF and New York) as a cinematic setting for narratives on crime, immigration, political activity and romance, and how it conveys utopic or distopic views of physical and social urban development. Also considers how cities lend themselves as transnational subjects for directors who cross national boundaries, such as Luis Buñuel, Woody Allen, Pedro Almodóvar and Alejandro González Iñárritu. Conducted in English. Writing assignments in Spanish. (Same as: HISP 3117)

Prerequisites: HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410).

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

LAS 3218  (c)   A Journey around Macondo: Garcia Marquez and His Contemporaries  

Nadia Celis.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Studies the main topics, techniques, and contributions of Colombian Nobel Prize winner Gabriel García Márquez as presented in “One Hundred Years of Solitude.” Explores the actual locations and the social, cultural, and literary trends that inspired the creation of Macondo, the so-called village of the world where the novel takes place, and the universal themes to which this imaginary town relates. Contemporary authors include Fuenmayor, Rojas Herazo, and Cepeda Samudio . (Same as: HISP 3218)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

LAS 3219  (c)   Letters from the Asylum: Madness and Representation in Latin American Fiction  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Explores the concept of madness and the varying ways in which mental illness has been represented in twentieth-century Latin American fiction. Readings include short stories and novels dealing with the issues of schizophrenia, paranoia, and psychotic behavior by authors such as Jorge Luis Borges, Carlos Fuentes, Cristina Rivera Garza, and Horacio Quiroga. . Also studies the ways in which certain authors draw from the language and symptoms of schizophrenia and paranoia in order to construct the narrative structure of their works and in order to enhance their representation of social, political, and historical conjunctures. Authors include César Aira, Roberto Bolaño, Diamela Eltit, and Ricardo Piglia, . (Same as: HISP 3219)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

LAS 3220  (c, IP)   Health and Healing in Early Modern Spain and Spanish America  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 08.  

Explores a range of literary and cultural texts related to the theory, practice and experience of health and healing in the early modern Hispanic world. Topics include gender and medicine; health and spiritual practices; herbalists and apothecaries; botanists and natural historians; gardens and gardeners; diet and food; healer and patients. Taught in English; all written work will be completed in Spanish. (Same as: HISP 3220)

Prerequisites: Two of: HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) and HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410).

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

LAS 3222  (c)   Voices of Women, Voices of the People  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Focuses on texts written by women from French-speaking West African, Central African, and Caribbean countries. Themes treated -- woman and/in colonization and slavery, memory, alienation, womanhood, individual and collective identity, gender relationships, women and tradition, women and modernism -- are approached from historical, anthropological, political, sociological, and gender perspectives. Readings by Tanella Boni (Côte dIvoire), Marie-Léontine Tsibinda (Congo-Brazzaville), Maryse Condé (Guadeloupe), Fabienne Kanor (Martinique), Marie-Célie Agnant (Haïti). (Same as: FRS 3201, AFRS 3201, GSWS 3323)

Prerequisites: Two of: either FRS 2409 (same as AFRS 2409 and LAS 2209) or FRS 2410 (same as AFRS 2412 and LAS 2210) or FRS 3000 or higher and either FRS 2409 (same as AFRS 2409 and LAS 2209) or FRS 2410 (same as AFRS 2412 and LAS 2210) or FRS 3000 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

LAS 3223  (c)   The War of the (Latin American) Worlds  

Carolyn Wolfenzon Niego.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Discusses the historical, social, and political consequences of the clash between tradition and modernity in Latin America during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as seen through novels, short stories, and film. Particular attention will be given to the ways in which the processes of modernization have caused the coexistence of divergent worlds within Latin American countries. Analyzes different social and political reactions to these conflictive realities, focusing on four cases: the Mexican Revolution, the Cuban Revolution, the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in Chile, and Andean insurgencies in Perú. Authors to be read may include Reinaldo Arenas, Roberto Bolaño, Simón Bolívar, Jorge Luis Borges, Cromwell Jara, Mario Vargas Llosa, Gabriel García Márquez, José Martí, Elena Poniatowska, and Juan Rulfo, among others. (Same as: HISP 3223)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

LAS 3225  (c)   Self-Figuration and Identity in Contemporary Southern Cone Literature  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Who speaks in a text? What relationship exists between literature and identity? How can we portray ourselves in specific political contexts? Addresses these and other questions by studying contemporary Southern Cone literary texts that deal with problems of subjectivity and self- representation in poetry and novels. Concentrates on texts that display a literary “persona” in contexts of violence and resistance (the dictatorships of the 1970s) and in more contemporary Latin American ones. Some authors include Borges, Gelman, and Peri-Rossi. Films and contextual historical readings used. Taught in Spanish. (Same as: HISP 3225)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

LAS 3226  (c)   A Body "of One's Own": Latina and Caribbean Women Writers  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

What kind of stories do bodies tell or conceal? How are those stories affected by living in a gendered body/subject? How do embodied stories relate to history and social realities? These are some of the questions addressed in this study of contemporary writing by women from the Hispanic Caribbean and the United States Latina/Chicana communities. Films and popular culture dialogue with literary works and feminist theory to enhance the examination of the relation of bodies and sexuality to social power, and the role of this relation in the shaping of both personal and national identities. Authors include Julia Álvarez, Fanny Buitrago, Judith Ortiz Cofer, Magali García Ramis, and Mayra Santos-Febres, among others. Taught in Spanish with readings in Spanish and English.. (Same as: HISP 3226, GSWS 3326)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

LAS 3227  (c, IP)   The Hispanic Avant-Garde: Poetry and Politics  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Questions what is meant by "avant-garde": how it was manifested in the Hispanic world in the first half of the twentieth century; how contemporaneous politics shaped or became shaped by it; how this relates to the world today. Focuses on poets such as Aleixandre, Garcia Lorca, Borges, Neruda, Huidobro, Storni, Lange, Novo, and Vallejo, while also considering a wide array of manifestos, literary journals, films, and other art forms from Spain, Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, Peru, Mexico, and Brazil. Taught in Spanish with some theoretical and historical readings in English. (Same as: HISP 3227)

Prerequisites: Two of: HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) and HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410).

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

LAS 3228  (c)   Beyond the Postcard: Thinking and Writing the Caribbean  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

From the first chronicles of Columbus, who believed he had arrived in "The Indies,” to the fantasies of global visitors lured by the comforts of secluded resorts, imagination has been a defining force impacting both the representation and the material lives of Caribbean people. Explores the historical trends that have shaped Caribbean societies, cultural identities, and intellectual history through a panoramic study of twentieth- and twenty-first-century fiction, essays, and films, with a focus on authors from the Hispanic Caribbean and US-Latinas of Caribbean descent. Engaging with the responses from Caribbean intellectuals to the challenges of the distorting mirror, addresses: how writers and artists have responded to the legacy of colonialism, slavery, and the plantation economy; how literature and art have depicted dominant trends in the region’s more recent history such as absolutist regimes, massive migrations, the tourist industry, and even natural disasters; how the Caribbean drawn by artists and intellectuals relates to global representations of the region. Authors include Piñera, Padura, Santos-Febres, Chaviano, and Junot Díaz. Taught in Spanish. (Same as: HISP 3228, AFRS 3228)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

LAS 3230  (c)   Colonial Seductions in Spanish America  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Studies how divergent European and indigenous conceptions of marriage, sex, and sin shaped the colonization of the Spanish Americas during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. A variety of conquest histories, epics, and plays by authors like Hernán Cortés, Titu Cusi Yupanqui, and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz are read alongside theoretical texts on the study of gender, sexuality, and colonialism. Through historical and literary analyses, considers how Europeans and indigenous subjects understood, imposed, and violated sexual norms. Conducted in Spanish. (Same as: HISP 3230, GSWS 3230)

Prerequisites: SPAN 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or SPAN 3200 or higher or SPAN 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2016.

LAS 3231  (c, IP)   Sor Juana and María de Zayas: Early Modern Feminisms  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Did feminism exist in the early modern period? Examines key women authors from the early Hispanic World, considering the representation of gender, sexuality, race, and identity in distinct political and social contexts. Focuses on Mexican author Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (1651-1695) and Spanish author María de Zayas (1590-1661), alongside other prominent women writers from the period. Students read short stories, essays, poems, and personal letters. Conducted in Spanish. (Same as: HISP 3231, GSWS 3231)

Prerequisites: HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410).

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

LAS 3235  (c, IP)   Mexican Fictions: Voices from the Border  

Every Other Year. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Explores the representation of Mexican history in literature by Mexico’s most canonical writers of the twentieth and early twenty-first century. Key moments in the history of Mexico discussed include the Mexican Revolution and its legacy, the struggles for modernization, the 1968 massacre of Tlatelolco, the concept of the border from a Mexican perspective, immigration to the United States, and the War on Drugs. Literary texts in a variety of genres (short stories, novellas, novels, theater, essays, chronicles and film) are complemented by historical readings and critical essays.. Authors include: Mariano Azuela, Sabina Berman, Rosario Castellanos, Luis Humberto Crosthwite, Carlos Fuentes, Yuri Herrera, Jorge Ibarguengoitia, Octavio Paz, Valeria Luiselli, Elmer Mendoza, Guadalupe Nettel, Octavio Paz, Juan Rulfo, Daniel Sada, Paco Ignacio Taibo II, and Helena María Viramontes (Same as: HISP 3235)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017.

LAS 3237  (c)   Hispanic Short Story  

Gustavo Faveron Patriau.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

An investigation of the short story as a literary genre, beginning in the nineteenth century, involving discussion of its aesthetics, as well as its political, social, and cultural ramifications in the Spanish-speaking world. Authors include Pardo Bazán, Borges, Cortázar, Echevarría, Ferré, García Márquez, and others. (Same as: HISP 3237)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2017.

LAS 3239  (c)   Borges and the Borgesian  

Gustavo Faveron Patriau.
Every Other Year. Spring 2020. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

An examination of the Argentinian writer Jorge Luis Borges’s work, focusing not only on his short stories, poems, essays, film scripts, interviews, and cinematic adaptations, but also on the writers who had a particular influence on his work. Also studies Latin American, European, and United States writers who were later influenced by the Argentinian master. An organizing concept is Borges’s idea that a writer creates his own precursors. (Same as: HISP 3239)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2018.

LAS 3243  (c)   Imaginary Cities/Real Cities in Latin America  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Examines the representation of urban spaces in Spanish American literature during the last six decades. While mid-twentieth-century fictional towns such as Macondo and Comala tended to emphasize exoticism, marginality, and remoteness, more recent narratives have abandoned the “magical” and tend to take place in metropolitan spaces that coincide with contemporary large cities such as Lima and Buenos Aires. The treatment of social class divisions and transgressions, territoriality, and the impact of the space on the individual experience are studied in novels, short stories, and film from the 1950s to the present. Authors include Rulfo, García Márquez, Onetti, Donoso, Vargas Llosa, Sábato, Reynoso, Ribeyro, Piñera, Gutiérrez, Bellatín, Caicedo, and Junot Díaz, among others. (Same as: HISP 3243)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

LAS 3247  (c)   Translating Cultures  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

Far beyond the linguistic exercise of converting words from one language to another, translation is an art that engages the practitioner in cultural, political, and aesthetic questions. How does translation influence national identity? What are the limits of translation? Can culture be translated? How does gender affect translation? Students explore these questions and develop strategies and techniques through translating texts from a variety of cultural contexts and literary and non-literary genres. Also explores ethics and techniques of interpreting between Spanish and English in different fields. Course taught in Spanish. (Same as: HISP 3247)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016.

LAS 3250  (c, IP)   The Southern Cone Revisited: Contemporary Challenges  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

How do artists distinguish their contemporary moment from the past? What challenges does it pose to literature and film? Building on ideas by Agamben, Benjamin, and Didi-Huberman, explores these questions in the context of contemporary Argentinean, Chilean, and Uruguayan poetry, short stories, novels, and films. Topics include post-dictatorship societies, text/image dynamics, new forms of subjectivity, human/post-human interactions, and economic and bio-political violence, as seen in works by Sergio Chejfec, Cristina Peri Rossi, Nadia Prado, Gabriela Cabezón Cámara, Pedro Lemebel, Fernanda Trías, and others. Taught in Spanish. (Same as: HISP 3249)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

LAS 3251  (c, IP)    Attesting to Violence: Aesthetics of War and Peace in Contemporary Colombia  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

The enduring armed conflict in Colombia has nurtured a culture of violence, with effects in every sector of society. Among its better-known actors are the leftist guerrillas, the right-wing paramilitary forces, and the national army, all influenced by the rise of drug trafficking in the Americas and by United States interventions. This course focuses on how contemporary Colombian writers and artists have responded to war, and how they resist the erasure of memory resulting from pervasive violence. In light of the most recent peace process, the course also examines how artists, activists, and civil society are using aesthetics, arts, and performance to face challenges such as healing the wounds of conflict and inventing peace in a society whose younger generations have no memory of life without violence. Materials include articles in the social sciences, movies, and TV series, along with literary works (Abad, García Márquez, Restrepo, and Vásquez, among others). (Same as: HISP 3251)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

LAS 3252  (c, IP)   The Battle of Chile: From Allende to Pinochet  

Non-Standard Rotation. Enrollment limit: 16.  

In 1970, the Chilean Salvador Allende became one of the first Marxists in the world to be democratically elected president of a country. His attempted reforms led to years of social unrest. In 1973, a right-wing military coup led to what would be General Augusto Pinochet’s seventeen years of brutal dictatorship. This course discusses that period of Chilean (and Latin American) history through locally produced sources, both from the social sciences and the arts, with a focus on literature (Bolaño, Meruane, Lemebel, Neruda, Lihn) and cinema (Ruiz, Larraín), with the goal of understanding the ways in which Latin American nations deal with their historical past with regard to issues of memory, collective memory, postdictatorial political negotiations, human rights, and social reconciliation. (Same as: HISP 3252)

Prerequisites: Two of: either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher and either HISP 2409 (same as LAS 2409) or HISP 2410 (same as LAS 2410) or HISP 3200 or higher.

Previous terms offered: Spring 2019.

LAS 3430  (c, ESD, IP)   Encountering Colonialisms in Latin America  

Irina Popescu.
Every Other Year. Spring 2020. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

This advanced seminar examines the intersections between constructions of race, gender, nation, and cultural production in Latin America during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The countries we will focus on in this course are Cuba, Mexico, Brazil, Guatemala, and Argentina. Readings will be drawn from a variety of disciplines, including history, critical race and gender theory, literature, and anthropology. This course will be divided into two parts. During the first half of the semester, we will critically engage with some of the history and literature on mestizaje and the endurance of slavery during the nineteenth century. This will highlight how nationalist projects adopted legal and political methods of exclusion. The second part of the course focuses on how cultural production, such as art, literature, film, and music, questions and reforms the nineteenth century’s constructions of citizenship and human rights for indigenous and black subjects.

LAS 3712  (b, ESD)   Migrant Imaginaries  

Marcos López.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Examines how immigrants view and transform the world around them in the United States. While normative approaches to the study of immigration construct migrants as objects of inquiry, this course instead will draw primarily on migrant perspectives and experiences in the diaspora that originate from Latin America, Asia, and Africa. (Same as: SOC 3410)

Prerequisites: Two of: SOC 1101 and SOC 2000 - 2969.

LAS 3720  (b)   Youth and Agency in Insecure Times  

Krista Van Vleet.
Non-Standard Rotation. Spring 2020. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Explores research on youth as a window into broader questions related to agency, identity, and social, political, and economic inequality in the contemporary world. Youth move between families, communities, and nations; claim belonging to divergent communities; create distinct identities; and navigate hierarchies. Incorporates attention to culturally specific notions of childhood, adolescence, and adulthood while highlighting youth and children as social actors. Draws on theoretical approaches to agency, subjectivity, and resistance in late-twentieth and early twenty-first-century anthropology. Considers methodological and ethical implications of research with children and youth. Topics may include adoption, citizenship, migration, labor, reproductive politics, human trafficking, tourism, and activism in Latin America, as well as Asia, Oceania, and/or Africa. Hierarchies of gender, ethnicity, race, sexuality, class, and age are considered throughout. (Same as: ANTH 3320)

Prerequisites: ANTH 1101 or SOC 1101.

Previous terms offered: Fall 2018.

LAS 3900  (c, IP, VPA)   Women, Performance, and Activism in the Americas  

Irina Popescu.
Non-Standard Rotation. Fall 2019. Enrollment limit: 16.
  

Explores when, why, and how women organize collectively to challenge political, economic, and social injustice in the late twentieth century. This course investigates how civil rights and labor movements, the rise and fall of dictatorships, and neoliberalism impacted and continues to impact female cultural production and activism in the Americas. In our investigation, we will turn to the intersection between art and activism as we look at a wide range of artistic practices, from literature and film to site-specific performance art and interventionist art. Throughout the semester, we will revisit the following questions as we consider the development of female activism in the Americas: 1) what is the relationship between feminism and activism, 2) can literature and performance be placed at the service of activism, and 3) how does looking at the Americas as a whole enable us to better understand the shared injustices across the North/South divide? (Same as: GSWS 3900)